The people of Nigeria voice concern over corrupt politicians, the negative influence of Shell and the vagabonds in power.
July 04, 2012
Discontent with Shell is continuing to grow in Nigeria, making room for another wave of protests against the vagabonds in power.
Corruption scandals surrounding Shell seem to dominate the media, creating anger from the public. The corruption penetrates every sphere of Nigerian electoral politics, creating conditions that demonstrate to the Nigerian people that street protest is their best vehicle for fighting back.
Farouk Lawan led a Nigerian parliamentary committee that investigated fuel importers in January over accusations they received 1.1 trillion naira ($6.7 billion) in illegal payments.
Now, Lawan is under investigation himself, facing serious questioning from the police over allegations that he took a $620,000 bribe from a fuel importer and frequent donor to Nigeria’s ruling party.
His recent reversal of roles, from accuser to accused is just a small part of a larger web of allegations and political infighting that have surrounded President Goodluck Jonathan’s administration. The extremely corrupt administration has been “unable” to meet the pledge to end fuel subsidies, reorganize the oil industry and “clean up the financial markets”.
A few months ago, Occupy Nigeria erupted against fuel subsidies, inspiring thousands of young and exhausted Nigerian citizens to take their concerns to the streets. We don’t know when a movement of this scale will erupt again, but with the influence of Shell, conditions in Nigeria continue to get worse. And as activist/singer Nneka pointed out in a recent interview, the people will be back.
-R.Cunningham

The people of Nigeria voice concern over corrupt politicians, the negative influence of Shell and the vagabonds in power.

July 04, 2012

Discontent with Shell is continuing to grow in Nigeria, making room for another wave of protests against the vagabonds in power.

Corruption scandals surrounding Shell seem to dominate the media, creating anger from the public. The corruption penetrates every sphere of Nigerian electoral politics, creating conditions that demonstrate to the Nigerian people that street protest is their best vehicle for fighting back.

Farouk Lawan led a Nigerian parliamentary committee that investigated fuel importers in January over accusations they received 1.1 trillion naira ($6.7 billion) in illegal payments.

Now, Lawan is under investigation himself, facing serious questioning from the police over allegations that he took a $620,000 bribe from a fuel importer and frequent donor to Nigeria’s ruling party.

His recent reversal of roles, from accuser to accused is just a small part of a larger web of allegations and political infighting that have surrounded President Goodluck Jonathan’s administration. The extremely corrupt administration has been “unable” to meet the pledge to end fuel subsidies, reorganize the oil industry and “clean up the financial markets”.

A few months ago, Occupy Nigeria erupted against fuel subsidies, inspiring thousands of young and exhausted Nigerian citizens to take their concerns to the streets. We don’t know when a movement of this scale will erupt again, but with the influence of Shell, conditions in Nigeria continue to get worse. And as activist/singer Nneka pointed out in a recent interview, the people will be back.

-R.Cunningham

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