Shocking details of a Mississippi School-to-Prison pipelineNovember 28, 2012
Cedrico Green can’t exactly remember how many times he went back and forth to juvenile. When asked to venture a guess he says, “Maybe 30.” He was put on probation by a youth court judge for getting into a fight when he was in eighth grade. Thereafter, any of Green’s school-based infractions, from being a few minutes late for class to breaking the school dress code by wearing the wrong color socks, counted as violations of his probation and led to his immediate suspension and incarceration in the local juvenile detention center.
But Green wasn’t alone. A bracing Department of Justice lawsuit filed last month against Meridian, Miss., where Green lives and is set to graduate from high school this coming year, argues that the city’s juvenile justice system has operated a school to prison pipeline that shoves students out of school and into the criminal justice system, and violates young people’s due process rights along the way.
In Meridian, when schools want to discipline children, they do much more than just send them to the principal’s office. They call the police, who show up to arrest children who are as young as 10 years old. Arrests, the Department of Justice says, happen automatically, regardless of whether the police officer knows exactly what kind of offense the child has committed or whether that offense is even worthy of an arrest. The police department’s policy is to arrest all children referred to the agency.
Once those children are in the juvenile justice system, they are denied basic constitutional rights. They are handcuffed and incarcerated for days without any hearing and subsequently warehoused without understanding their alleged probation violations.
“[D]efendants engage in a pattern or practice of unlawful conduct through which they routinely and systematically arrest and incarcerate children, including for minor school rule infractions, without even the most basic procedural safeguards, and in violation of these children’s constitutional rights,” the DOJ’s 37-page complaint reads. Meridian’s years of systemic abuse punish youth “so arbitrarily and severely as to shock the conscience,” the complaint reads.
Full articlePhoto
This is incredibly disturbing. Mississippi has five private prisons that will directly profit from this School-to-Prison pipeline. One of the prisons, Delta County Correctional Facility, is already at capacity at 1,000 prisoners. Definitely read the full story. 

Shocking details of a Mississippi School-to-Prison pipeline
November 28, 2012

Cedrico Green can’t exactly remember how many times he went back and forth to juvenile. When asked to venture a guess he says, “Maybe 30.” He was put on probation by a youth court judge for getting into a fight when he was in eighth grade. Thereafter, any of Green’s school-based infractions, from being a few minutes late for class to breaking the school dress code by wearing the wrong color socks, counted as violations of his probation and led to his immediate suspension and incarceration in the local juvenile detention center.

But Green wasn’t alone. A bracing Department of Justice lawsuit filed last month against Meridian, Miss., where Green lives and is set to graduate from high school this coming year, argues that the city’s juvenile justice system has operated a school to prison pipeline that shoves students out of school and into the criminal justice system, and violates young people’s due process rights along the way.

In Meridian, when schools want to discipline children, they do much more than just send them to the principal’s office. They call the police, who show up to arrest children who are as young as 10 years old. Arrests, the Department of Justice says, happen automatically, regardless of whether the police officer knows exactly what kind of offense the child has committed or whether that offense is even worthy of an arrest. The police department’s policy is to arrest all children referred to the agency.

Once those children are in the juvenile justice system, they are denied basic constitutional rights. They are handcuffed and incarcerated for days without any hearing and subsequently warehoused without understanding their alleged probation violations.

“[D]efendants engage in a pattern or practice of unlawful conduct through which they routinely and systematically arrest and incarcerate children, including for minor school rule infractions, without even the most basic procedural safeguards, and in violation of these children’s constitutional rights,” the DOJ’s 37-page complaint reads. Meridian’s years of systemic abuse punish youth “so arbitrarily and severely as to shock the conscience,” the complaint reads.

Full article
Photo

This is incredibly disturbing. Mississippi has five private prisons that will directly profit from this School-to-Prison pipeline. One of the prisons, Delta County Correctional Facility, is already at capacity at 1,000 prisoners. Definitely read the full story. 

  1. creativity-to-the-limit reblogged this from thepeoplesrecord
  2. reginaabyssi reblogged this from reagan-was-a-horrible-president
  3. roshytsunami reblogged this from ecokitty
  4. bringiton911 reblogged this from thepeoplesrecord
  5. nadja-855 reblogged this from ecokitty
  6. maaandrews17 reblogged this from finalfortuna
  7. finalfortuna reblogged this from ecokitty
  8. fridays-neophyte reblogged this from kastiakbc
  9. alexandrabarton reblogged this from ecokitty
  10. zial-shade reblogged this from kastiakbc
  11. crownca reblogged this from ecokitty
  12. koko-ghost reblogged this from ecokitty
  13. xamaltheia reblogged this from ecokitty
  14. kurowolf18 reblogged this from ecokitty
  15. jakeirako reblogged this from ecokitty
  16. littlefujoshi reblogged this from kastiakbc
  17. thescarletmacaw7 reblogged this from ecokitty
  18. solemn-vow reblogged this from ecokitty
  19. dimensionalguitarrift reblogged this from kastiakbc
  20. lyaid reblogged this from ecokitty
  21. kastiakbc reblogged this from ecokitty
  22. thesageofthyme reblogged this from ecokitty
  23. creatingmyowndreams reblogged this from ecokitty and added:
    This makes me really ashamed of my state….
  24. ecokitty reblogged this from thepeoplesrecord
  25. paisaman3k reblogged this from loveyourchaos
  26. coachk13 reblogged this from thepeoplesrecord