Bahrain police attack anti-government woman protesters with stun grenades and tear gas
April 1, 2013

Tensions are once again high in Bahrain after police dispersed anti-government protesters with stun grenades and tear gas. The police intervention came after a demonstration by women was banned.

They were on the streets of the west coast town of Malkiya in support of jailed political prisoners and against the upcoming Formula One race in April.

It is the latest in a series of protests on the Gulf island, led mainly by Shi’ite Muslim groups demanding equality with the Sunnis, as well as political reforms.

There were major turnouts two weeks ago on the second anniversary of the intervention by a Saudi-led force which helped crush a pro-democracy uprising.

Bahrain’s opposition and government negotiators resumed reconciliation talks last month for the first time since July 2011, but little progress has been reported.

Source

Three Bahraini Shia protesters have died as the government continues to weaponize tear gas to extra-judicially kill opposition protesters.

Since February 14, which marked the 2nd anniversary of Bahrain’s pro-democracy movement, protesters have filled the streets of Bahraini cities. Police have tried to disperse rallies with teargas & firing guns into large crows. 

Mahmood Al-Jazeeri, 20, was the third protester to be fatally injured when he was shot directly in the face by a teargas canister as close range. He was unarmed & died in the hospital on February 22. Sixteen-year-old Hussain Ali Ahmed Abrahim was also shot & killed by shotgun wounds on February 14. Another unnamed protester died the same day as a result of being hit with a teargas canister. 

Pro-democracy protests around Bahrain have continued today. 

Teenager dies during opposition protests in Bahrain on second anniversary of uprisingFebruary 14, 2013
Bahraini security forces have fired teargas, rubber bullets and birdshot at demonstrators hurling rocks and Molotov cocktails in street battles that left one teenager dead and dozens more people injured on the second anniversary of the country’s failed pro-democracy uprising.
The main opposition group, al-Wefaq, said 16-year-old Ali Ahmed Ibrahim Aljazeeri died from his injuries about an hour after being shot early in the morning in the village of Diya, near the capital Manama. “He was shot with three rounds from a birdshot gun and died of critical injuries to the upper body and lungs,” the group said. “Witnesses confirm he was posing no threat to any police officers at the time.”
Dozens of other people were also hurt in the violence, al-Wefaq said, some by teargas and others more seriously. It posted pictures online of some of the wounded, including a photograph of the dead youth with bandages on his stomach.
It accused the Bahraini authorities of deploying “large numbers of armoured vehicles, police cars and buses, convoys of military vehicles and troops … to face peaceful protests demanding freedom and democracy”.
Dozens of videos posted by activists showed groups of youths setting up roadblocks and barricades and hurling stones and firebombs at security forces, who responded with teargas.
Bahrain's chief of public security, Major General Tariq Hassan al-Hassan, said in a statement that the death came after a group of some 300 rioters attacked police “with rocks, steel rods and Molotov cocktails. Warning shots were fired but failed to disperse the advancing crowd who continued their attack. Officers discharged birdshot to defend themselves.”
Hassan confirmed “at least one protester was injured” and “a short time later, a young man was pronounced dead at [the country’s main hospital] Salmaniya Medical Complex”. He warned the public not to try to “exploit the death for political purposes, or as an excuse to engage in criminal or riotous behaviour” and insisted most areas of the country were calm and traffic was flowing freely in Manama.
Bahrain has seen almost daily protests since the mass protests of 14 February 2011. Demonstrators want greater rights for the country’s Shia majority and an end to the absolute power of the ruling Sunni al-Khalifa dynasty, which picks all key government and military posts. Opposition demands for far-reaching reform include a constitutional monarchy and an elected prime minister to replace Prince Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa, who has held the job since independence in 1971 and is an uncle of King Hamad. The government denies discrimination against Shias.
The violence could derail reconciliation talks that resumed last weekend between al-Wefaq and other, mostly Shia Muslim, opposition groups and Sunni envoys. Alistair Burt, the UK foreign office minister, said on Twitter it was “important everyone remains committed to the national consensus dialogue – it’s the only way to promote peace and stability in Bahrain”.
But one prominent activist, Ala’a Shehabi, said the protests showed the irrelevance of the government’s dialogue initiative. "The majority of Bahrainis really just want to live in basic dignity and freedom," Shehabi, founder of the campaign group Bahrain Watch, told the Guardian. "They don’t believe the current royal family is willing to deliver that."
Shehabi said the opposition was sceptical about the national consensus dialogue because no senior members of the government or royal family are involved. “To the youth on the street, the dialogue initiative is irrelevant. Even opposition members who have taken part stress the importance of the street protest movement. There is so much scepticism about the sincerity by the government over these talks that no one is really taking them seriously.”
An international inquiry said 35 people died during Bahrain’s uprising; the opposition puts the toll at more than 80.
Amnesty International has called for the Bahraini authorities to release political prisoners, lift restrictions on freedom of expression and prosecute security force members responsible for human rights abuses.
Its Middle East and North Africa deputy director, Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, said the government “cannot carry on imprisoning people simply because it can’t take criticism. It’s time that people detained simply for exercising their right to freedom of expression be released and for the harassment of other activists to desist.”
Source

Teenager dies during opposition protests in Bahrain on second anniversary of uprising
February 14, 2013

Bahraini security forces have fired teargas, rubber bullets and birdshot at demonstrators hurling rocks and Molotov cocktails in street battles that left one teenager dead and dozens more people injured on the second anniversary of the country’s failed pro-democracy uprising.

The main opposition group, al-Wefaq, said 16-year-old Ali Ahmed Ibrahim Aljazeeri died from his injuries about an hour after being shot early in the morning in the village of Diya, near the capital Manama. “He was shot with three rounds from a birdshot gun and died of critical injuries to the upper body and lungs,” the group said. “Witnesses confirm he was posing no threat to any police officers at the time.”

Dozens of other people were also hurt in the violence, al-Wefaq said, some by teargas and others more seriously. It posted pictures online of some of the wounded, including a photograph of the dead youth with bandages on his stomach.

It accused the Bahraini authorities of deploying “large numbers of armoured vehicles, police cars and buses, convoys of military vehicles and troops … to face peaceful protests demanding freedom and democracy”.

Dozens of videos posted by activists showed groups of youths setting up roadblocks and barricades and hurling stones and firebombs at security forces, who responded with teargas.

Bahrain's chief of public security, Major General Tariq Hassan al-Hassan, said in a statement that the death came after a group of some 300 rioters attacked police “with rocks, steel rods and Molotov cocktails. Warning shots were fired but failed to disperse the advancing crowd who continued their attack. Officers discharged birdshot to defend themselves.”

Hassan confirmed “at least one protester was injured” and “a short time later, a young man was pronounced dead at [the country’s main hospital] Salmaniya Medical Complex”. He warned the public not to try to “exploit the death for political purposes, or as an excuse to engage in criminal or riotous behaviour” and insisted most areas of the country were calm and traffic was flowing freely in Manama.

Bahrain has seen almost daily protests since the mass protests of 14 February 2011. Demonstrators want greater rights for the country’s Shia majority and an end to the absolute power of the ruling Sunni al-Khalifa dynasty, which picks all key government and military posts. Opposition demands for far-reaching reform include a constitutional monarchy and an elected prime minister to replace Prince Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa, who has held the job since independence in 1971 and is an uncle of King Hamad. The government denies discrimination against Shias.

The violence could derail reconciliation talks that resumed last weekend between al-Wefaq and other, mostly Shia Muslim, opposition groups and Sunni envoys. Alistair Burt, the UK foreign office minister, said on Twitter it was “important everyone remains committed to the national consensus dialogue – it’s the only way to promote peace and stability in Bahrain”.

But one prominent activist, Ala’a Shehabi, said the protests showed the irrelevance of the government’s dialogue initiative. "The majority of Bahrainis really just want to live in basic dignity and freedom," Shehabi, founder of the campaign group Bahrain Watch, told the Guardian. "They don’t believe the current royal family is willing to deliver that."

Shehabi said the opposition was sceptical about the national consensus dialogue because no senior members of the government or royal family are involved. “To the youth on the street, the dialogue initiative is irrelevant. Even opposition members who have taken part stress the importance of the street protest movement. There is so much scepticism about the sincerity by the government over these talks that no one is really taking them seriously.”

An international inquiry said 35 people died during Bahrain’s uprising; the opposition puts the toll at more than 80.

Amnesty International has called for the Bahraini authorities to release political prisoners, lift restrictions on freedom of expression and prosecute security force members responsible for human rights abuses.

Its Middle East and North Africa deputy director, Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, said the government “cannot carry on imprisoning people simply because it can’t take criticism. It’s time that people detained simply for exercising their right to freedom of expression be released and for the harassment of other activists to desist.”

Source

Bahrain revokes citizenship of opposition membersNovember 7, 2012
The government of Bahrain revoked the citizenship of 31 activists for threats to state security, the interior ministry said. The announcement coincided with the arrests of four suspects connected to Monday bombings in which two people died.
The four arrested include prominent opposition figures: Dr Saaed Shehabi, London-based Bahraini political activist and member of the Bahrain Freedom Movement, former MP Jalal Fairooz and Hasan Mushaima, the head of the Haq Movement – a high-profile Bahraini opposition group.Their citizenship was revoked for violating Article 10 of the country’s Citizenship Act, which allows for the revocation of rights if the individual damages or threatens the state’s security.
Bahrain also announced on Tuesday that it detained four suspects in connection to the five bombings that killed two people in the capital of Manama. The Bahraini chief of public security accused Shiite Hezbollah militants from Lebanon of perpetrating the attacks.
“Their terrorist practices prove that they have been trained outside the kingdom,” Bahrain News Agency quoted Information Minister Samira Ibrahim bin Rajab as saying. “The hallmarks of Hezbollah are crystal clear.”
The minister said the opposition groups are using tactics espoused by Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and blamed pro-Iran TV stations for supporting the uprising in Bahrain.
Bahrain accused Shiite Iran of instigating turmoil on a number of occasions, a charge that Tehran denies. Hezbollah also denies involvement in the country, but has criticized Bahrain’s ruling Sunni monarchy for its handling of the crisis.
Bahrain is home to the US fifth fleet. The US-allied, Sunni-dominated government has struggled to suppress the pro-democracy and largely Shiite opposition movement.
Saudi Arabia, the most powerful country in the Gulf Cooperation Council and Tehran’s main rival, strongly supported the king of Bahrain against the popular uprising, going as far as deploying Saudi security forces in the country.
Since the uprising began in February 2011, Bahraini police have responded with brutal force, and have been accused of carrying out midnight house raids in Shia neighborhoods, denying prisoners medical care and beating detainees at checkpoints.
Some 3,000 people have been arrested, and at least five people have died from torture while in custody. By April 2012, more than 80 people had died during the uprising.
Last month, a Bahraini blogger received six months in prison for allegedly insulting the ruling monarchy, and four more were arrested for insulting the king on Twitter.
In October, a Bahraini court rejected a request from human rights activist Nabeel Rajab to suspend his three-year sentence for “participation in illegal demonstrations.”
Source

Bahrain revokes citizenship of opposition members
November 7, 2012

The government of Bahrain revoked the citizenship of 31 activists for threats to state security, the interior ministry said. The announcement coincided with the arrests of four suspects connected to Monday bombings in which two people died.

The four arrested include prominent opposition figures: Dr Saaed Shehabi, London-based Bahraini political activist and member of the Bahrain Freedom Movement, former MP Jalal Fairooz and Hasan Mushaima, the head of the Haq Movement – a high-profile Bahraini opposition group.Their citizenship was revoked for violating Article 10 of the country’s Citizenship Act, which allows for the revocation of rights if the individual damages or threatens the state’s security.

Bahrain also announced on Tuesday that it detained four suspects in connection to the five bombings that killed two people in the capital of Manama. The Bahraini chief of public security accused Shiite Hezbollah militants from Lebanon of perpetrating the attacks.

“Their terrorist practices prove that they have been trained outside the kingdom,” Bahrain News Agency quoted Information Minister Samira Ibrahim bin Rajab as saying. “The hallmarks of Hezbollah are crystal clear.”

The minister said the opposition groups are using tactics espoused by Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and blamed pro-Iran TV stations for supporting the uprising in Bahrain.

Bahrain accused Shiite Iran of instigating turmoil on a number of occasions, a charge that Tehran denies. Hezbollah also denies involvement in the country, but has criticized Bahrain’s ruling Sunni monarchy for its handling of the crisis.

Bahrain is home to the US fifth fleet. The US-allied, Sunni-dominated government has struggled to suppress the pro-democracy and largely Shiite opposition movement.

Saudi Arabia, the most powerful country in the Gulf Cooperation Council and Tehran’s main rival, strongly supported the king of Bahrain against the popular uprising, going as far as deploying Saudi security forces in the country.

Since the uprising began in February 2011, Bahraini police have responded with brutal force, and have been accused of carrying out midnight house raids in Shia neighborhoods, denying prisoners medical care and beating detainees at checkpoints.

Some 3,000 people have been arrested, and at least five people have died from torture while in custody. By April 2012, more than 80 people had died during the uprising.

Last month, a Bahraini blogger received six months in prison for allegedly insulting the ruling monarchy, and four more were arrested for insulting the king on Twitter.

In October, a Bahraini court rejected a request from human rights activist Nabeel Rajab to suspend his three-year sentence for “participation in illegal demonstrations.”

Source

Bahrain government bans protests amid violenceOctober 30, 2012
Bahrain banned all protest gatherings on Tuesday and threatened legal action against groups said to be backing escalating demonstrations and clashes.
The interior ministry order is the most sweeping attempt to quash the anti-government uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom since martial law was imposed during the early months of unrest last year.
It sharply increases pressure on political groups from Bahrain’s Shia majority, which has led the protests in support of a greater political voice.
A crackdown on opposition groups could raise complications for Washington and other western allies that have stood by Bahrain’s monarchy during more than 20 months of unrest. The US has important military ties with Bahrain, which hosts the US navy’s 5th Fleet, but it also has called for increased dialogue to ease the tensions.
Shias make up around 70% of Bahrain’s 525,000 citizens, and claim they face systematic discrimination such as being denied top political and security posts. The Sunni monarchy has made a series of concessions – including giving more powers to the elected parliament – but opposition groups say the reforms do little to loosen the ruling family’s grip on power.
More than 50 people have been killed in Bahrain’s unrest since February 2011. Among them were two policemen who died this month from injuries suffered in attacks in which firebombs and explosives were used.
An interior ministry statement said Bahraini society was fed up with near nonstop demonstrations and clashes and that “there was a need to put an end to them”. Bahrain’s government has permitted limited protests and marches, but much of the violence occurs away from the authorised gatherings.
It added that any “illegal rally or gathering would be tackled through legal actions against those calling for and participating in it”.
The warning appeared aimed particularly at the largest Shia political bloc, al-Wefaq, which has organised many opposition marches. Another rally is planned for Friday.
An al-Wefaq official, Hadi al-Musawi, struck a defiant tone, saying the interior ministry order was against international human rights.
Other Gulf states have placed limits on political expression amid worries that movements inspired by last year’s Arab spring could threaten their ruling systems. Last week, Kuwait banned all public gatherings of more than 20 people following opposition protests ahead of parliamentary elections on 1 December.
Source

Bahrain government bans protests amid violence
October 30, 2012

Bahrain banned all protest gatherings on Tuesday and threatened legal action against groups said to be backing escalating demonstrations and clashes.

The interior ministry order is the most sweeping attempt to quash the anti-government uprising in the Sunni-ruled kingdom since martial law was imposed during the early months of unrest last year.

It sharply increases pressure on political groups from Bahrain’s Shia majority, which has led the protests in support of a greater political voice.

A crackdown on opposition groups could raise complications for Washington and other western allies that have stood by Bahrain’s monarchy during more than 20 months of unrest. The US has important military ties with Bahrain, which hosts the US navy’s 5th Fleet, but it also has called for increased dialogue to ease the tensions.

Shias make up around 70% of Bahrain’s 525,000 citizens, and claim they face systematic discrimination such as being denied top political and security posts. The Sunni monarchy has made a series of concessions – including giving more powers to the elected parliament – but opposition groups say the reforms do little to loosen the ruling family’s grip on power.

More than 50 people have been killed in Bahrain’s unrest since February 2011. Among them were two policemen who died this month from injuries suffered in attacks in which firebombs and explosives were used.

An interior ministry statement said Bahraini society was fed up with near nonstop demonstrations and clashes and that “there was a need to put an end to them”. Bahrain’s government has permitted limited protests and marches, but much of the violence occurs away from the authorised gatherings.

It added that any “illegal rally or gathering would be tackled through legal actions against those calling for and participating in it”.

The warning appeared aimed particularly at the largest Shia political bloc, al-Wefaq, which has organised many opposition marches. Another rally is planned for Friday.

An al-Wefaq official, Hadi al-Musawi, struck a defiant tone, saying the interior ministry order was against international human rights.

Other Gulf states have placed limits on political expression amid worries that movements inspired by last year’s Arab spring could threaten their ruling systems. Last week, Kuwait banned all public gatherings of more than 20 people following opposition protests ahead of parliamentary elections on 1 December.

Source

‘Bahrain buys favorable CNN content’

October 3, 2012

Amid a violent crackdown on a popular uprising, Bahrain paid CNN to get favorable coverage, says a former reporter who believes her documentary on the protests there was censored by the network.

Former CNN journalist Amber Lyon made the documentary more than six months ago. It was aired domestically in the US, but never made it to CNN international, raising claims that the management pulled the plug on the story. RT spoke to Lyon to get the full story of what happened.

RT: You feel your documentary should have been aired internationally. Why?

Amber Lyon:I’ve created a lot of documentaries for CNN that didn’t air internationally. Most I feel should’ve been aired internationally because seasoned, decades-long employees have approached me after it wasn’t aired and told me this should’ve been aired on CNN International and told that they felt that something strange was going on and that I should investigate it. And that’s where it was uncovered that we felt that this documentary was censored, because Bahrain was actually a paying customer for CNN. Bahrain is paying CNN to create content that shows Bahrain in a favorable light. Even though CNN says its content is editorially independent Bahrain can affect that – what we’ve seen with that documentary not airing and also with the constant struggle I had at CNN to get Bahrain coverage, accurate coverage of the human rights abuses on-air while I was there.

RT: CNN prides itself as a bastion of excellent journalism and impartiality, but in this case have they let themselves down?

AL: What CNN is doing is they are essentially creating what some people have termed “infomercials for dictators.” And that’s the sponsored content that they are airing on CNN International that is actually being paid for by regimes and governments. And this violates every principle of journalistic ethics, because we’re supposed to be watchdogs on these governments. We are not supposed to allow them to be a paying customer as journalists. And that’s the issue here – that CNN is feeding, then, this propaganda to the public and not fairly disclosing to the public that this is sponsored content.

For example CNN has been doing these programs for Georgia, Kazakhstan, also as we said Bahrain. One of the programs that they aired for Bahrain was called Bahrain i-List and had a CNN reporter Richard Quest lie from Bahrain for one full week. He was live at the racetrack at one point. There were mentions on his page about pearl diving and all the happy sides of Bahrain. But hard to find were the actual accusations from the majority of the Bahrain people that this regime needs to get out and that this regime is abusing and torturing doctors and journalists. Also difficult to find [were] accurate, simple disclosures on the CNN site and on this video telling viewers that this video you’re watching on this news channel – the most trusted name in news – is being paid for by this regime.”

RT: You witnessed first-hand some heavy-handed tactics in Bahrain while you were making this report. Can you tell us about that?

AL:We were able to kind of dodge our minders and sneak into some of the villages and actually see these atrocities – patients who had run out of hospitals that were shot with birdshot, ambulance drivers who were beaten. And as we were heading back out of these villages we were violently detained by security forces in Bahrain. About 20 masked men with machine guns, who then tried to erase all the video that they found, and luckily my female producer and I were able to hide some discs in our bras and we were able to actually get out of the country with this content. You can imagine Bahrain’s surprise when we got back to the US and this content was airing on CNN, and right after that is when the phone calls started coming into the network complaining about me and trying to get my coverage off the air.

There is constant demonization of Syria, Iran and other countries on the US mainstream media, but similar atrocities are happening in Bahrain and Saudi Arabia and I think this is an overall really harmful to journalism [sic] theme of these mainstream outlets following in the steps of US government and kind of shadowing how the US government feel about these areas.

You are very hard-pressed to find criticizing [sic] going on of Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, but you just see it all day long, demonization of Iran and Syria. This is dangerous to the American public because they are not being given the accurate story and accurate picture of our foreign policy and what’s happening in these other countries, and I fear that we are starting to see a constant demonization of Iran on US networks in what appears to be a systematic matter. For many of us, journalistically, that are noticing this, we are fearing [that] we are going to head into Iraq Number Two, except this time it’s with Iran.

Source

Bahrain activist Nabeel Rajab jailed for two yearsAugust 21, 2012
Prominent Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab has been jailed for three years for taking part in “illegal gatherings”.
He is already serving a three-month sentence he received in July over comments on social networking websites.
Mr Rajab, president of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, had previously been detained several times.
He was one of the organisers of pro-democracy protests which have rocked the Gulf kingdom since last February.
Mr Rajab’s lawyer Mohammed al-Jishi said three year-long sentences had been handed down on three separate counts.
Mr Jishi said he plans to appeal against the ruling.
Fellow activists immediately condemned the decision, with some members of the protest movement calling for demonstrations on Thursday evening.
Mr Rajab’s sentence in July came after prosecutors received complaints that he had libelled residents of the town of Muharraq on Twitter.
He wrote on Twitter, where he has more than 155,000 followers, that Prime Minister Sheikh Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa should step down, and that Muharraq residents had only welcomed him during a visit because he had offered them subsidies.
Mr Rajab’s appeal in that case has been deferred to 23 August, according to Mr Jishi.
Last week, several members of the US Congress wrote to the Bahraini King Hamad al-Khalifa expressing concern over Mr Rajab’s case and urging the release of “Bahrainis being held for crimes related to freedom of expression”.
Source

Bahrain activist Nabeel Rajab jailed for two years
August 21, 2012

Prominent Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab has been jailed for three years for taking part in “illegal gatherings”.

He is already serving a three-month sentence he received in July over comments on social networking websites.

Mr Rajab, president of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, had previously been detained several times.

He was one of the organisers of pro-democracy protests which have rocked the Gulf kingdom since last February.

Mr Rajab’s lawyer Mohammed al-Jishi said three year-long sentences had been handed down on three separate counts.

Mr Jishi said he plans to appeal against the ruling.

Fellow activists immediately condemned the decision, with some members of the protest movement calling for demonstrations on Thursday evening.

Mr Rajab’s sentence in July came after prosecutors received complaints that he had libelled residents of the town of Muharraq on Twitter.

He wrote on Twitter, where he has more than 155,000 followers, that Prime Minister Sheikh Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa should step down, and that Muharraq residents had only welcomed him during a visit because he had offered them subsidies.

Mr Rajab’s appeal in that case has been deferred to 23 August, according to Mr Jishi.

Last week, several members of the US Congress wrote to the Bahraini King Hamad al-Khalifa expressing concern over Mr Rajab’s case and urging the release of “Bahrainis being held for crimes related to freedom of expression”.

Source

Bahrain riot police fire tear gas, stun grenades at protestersAugust 3, 2012
Bahraini riot police have fired tear gas and stun grenades at hundreds of demonstrators attempting to block a highway. Frequent antigovernment protests have wracked the country since February 2011.
Protesters and police clashed in several Shiite villages late Thursday and early Friday, witnesses told AFP. The recent protests are a move by Bahrain’s opposition to spark further street demonstrations in the country.
The ongoing uprising by the country’s Shiite majority, which claims systematic discrimination on the part of Bahrain’s Sunni monarchy, has weakened after multiple mass arrests. At least 50 people have been killed and many more detained since protests began 18 months ago.
Advocacy group Physicians for Human Rights released a new report this month titled ‘Weaponizing Tear Gas,’ which accused Bahraini authorities of badly injuring and even killing protesters with tear gas by flooding enclosed spaces like cars and houses with the toxic chemicals.
The report stated that government officials misused tear gas against Shiite Muslim civilians, and that the attacks caused severe suffering amounting to torture. The report concluded that Bahraini authorities had “routinely violated every UN principle governing police use of force.”
The EU and US have made few statements and taken no direct action against the Bahraini government’s crackdown on the uprisings.
Richard Sollom, Deputy Director of Physicians for Human Rights and author of the report, noted that the report would likely not be well-received by the Obama administration, which has refrained from criticizing the Bahraini government, he said in an interview with New York Times.
Bahrain is home to the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, which patrols the Persian Gulf and is a strategic check against Iran.
The Bahraini government did not respond to the group’s request for an account of the exact types of tear gas used by the police, Sollom said. It also refused to reveal where it is obtaining the tear gas, although canisters recovered on the street by activists suggest that they were manufactured in the US, France and Brazil.
Several opposition leaders and human rights activists have been detained since protests began. Nabeel Rajab, head of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, was arrested and sentenced to three months in prison for participating in the uprisings.
The verdict related to a tweet Rajab wrote in June alleging that residents of the town of Muharraq had been bribed into making a show of support for the country’s Prime Minister. He was reportedly taken from his home by masked police. The case was one of several against Rajab, who had helped organize pro-democracy protests in the Gulf kingdom.
Bahrain’s Al-Wefaq Shiite opposition bloc claimed one of its leading female members, Ahlam al-Khuzai, had been detained by police at the airport on Friday. Khuzai was arrested before she could fly to Tunisia for a conference organized by Amnesty International.
Source

Bahrain riot police fire tear gas, stun grenades at protesters
August 3, 2012

Bahraini riot police have fired tear gas and stun grenades at hundreds of demonstrators attempting to block a highway. Frequent antigovernment protests have wracked the country since February 2011.

Protesters and police clashed in several Shiite villages late Thursday and early Friday, witnesses told AFP. The recent protests are a move by Bahrain’s opposition to spark further street demonstrations in the country.

The ongoing uprising by the country’s Shiite majority, which claims systematic discrimination on the part of Bahrain’s Sunni monarchy, has weakened after multiple mass arrests. At least 50 people have been killed and many more detained since protests began 18 months ago.

Advocacy group Physicians for Human Rights released a new report this month titled ‘Weaponizing Tear Gas,’ which accused Bahraini authorities of badly injuring and even killing protesters with tear gas by flooding enclosed spaces like cars and houses with the toxic chemicals.

The report stated that government officials misused tear gas against Shiite Muslim civilians, and that the attacks caused severe suffering amounting to torture. The report concluded that Bahraini authorities had “routinely violated every UN principle governing police use of force.”

The EU and US have made few statements and taken no direct action against the Bahraini government’s crackdown on the uprisings.

Richard Sollom, Deputy Director of Physicians for Human Rights and author of the report, noted that the report would likely not be well-received by the Obama administration, which has refrained from criticizing the Bahraini government, he said in an interview with New York Times.

Bahrain is home to the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, which patrols the Persian Gulf and is a strategic check against Iran.

The Bahraini government did not respond to the group’s request for an account of the exact types of tear gas used by the police, Sollom said. It also refused to reveal where it is obtaining the tear gas, although canisters recovered on the street by activists suggest that they were manufactured in the US, France and Brazil.

Several opposition leaders and human rights activists have been detained since protests began. Nabeel Rajab, head of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, was arrested and sentenced to three months in prison for participating in the uprisings.

The verdict related to a tweet Rajab wrote in June alleging that residents of the town of Muharraq had been bribed into making a show of support for the country’s Prime Minister. He was reportedly taken from his home by masked police. The case was one of several against Rajab, who had helped organize pro-democracy protests in the Gulf kingdom.

Bahrain’s Al-Wefaq Shiite opposition bloc claimed one of its leading female members, Ahlam al-Khuzai, had been detained by police at the airport on Friday. Khuzai was arrested before she could fly to Tunisia for a conference organized by Amnesty International.

Source

Anti-regime protests continue to flood BahrainJuly 29, 2012
Bahraini protesters have taken to the streets again across the sheikdom, calling for an end to the reign of the ruling monarchy.
The anti-regime protesters rallied in several villages on Saturday, chanting slogans against the Al Khalifa regime. The demonstrators also expressed solidarity with anti-regime protesters in neighboring Saudi Arabia and called for the immediate release of jailed Saudi cleric Sheikh Nemr al-Nemr. Anti-government demonstrations continue across the country, despite crackdown by the Manama regime. Bahrainis have been staging demonstrations since mid-February 2011, demanding political reform and the establishment of a constitutional monarchy, a plea that later changed to an outright call for the ouster of the ruling Al Khalifa family following its brutal crackdown on popular protests. Bahraini demonstrators hold King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa responsible for the death of protesters during the uprising. Meanwhile, Saudi anti-regime protesters held fresh demonstrations across Riyadh as well as the holy city of Mecca to protest against the arrest of political prisoners, including Sheikh al-Nemr. 
Source

Anti-regime protests continue to flood Bahrain
July 29, 2012

Bahraini protesters have taken to the streets again across the sheikdom, calling for an end to the reign of the ruling monarchy.

The anti-regime protesters rallied in several villages on Saturday, chanting slogans against the Al Khalifa regime. 

The demonstrators also expressed solidarity with anti-regime protesters in neighboring Saudi Arabia and called for the immediate release of jailed Saudi cleric Sheikh Nemr al-Nemr. 

Anti-government demonstrations continue across the country, despite crackdown by the Manama regime. 

Bahrainis have been staging demonstrations since mid-February 2011, demanding political reform and the establishment of a constitutional monarchy, a plea that later changed to an outright call for the ouster of the ruling Al Khalifa family following its brutal crackdown on popular protests. 

Bahraini demonstrators hold King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa responsible for the death of protesters during the uprising. 

Meanwhile, Saudi anti-regime protesters held fresh demonstrations across Riyadh as well as the holy city of Mecca to protest against the arrest of political prisoners, including Sheikh al-Nemr. 

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Bahrain imprisons protester for being critical of the prime minister on Twitter. 
July 09, 2012
A prominent Bahraini protest leader, Nabeel Rajab, was sentenced to three months in prison for a tweet criticizing the prime minister,Khalifah ibn Sulman al-Khalifah. (al-Khalifah is the uncle of King Hamad bin Isa who is depicted in the picture above. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any pictures of al-Khalifah getting punched.)
Rajab has been a central figure in organizing protests during 16 months of unrest in the Gulf Arab state. Majority Shi’ite Muslims have spearheaded calls for democratic reforms to limit the powers of the ruling Sunni Muslim Al Khalifa family.
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Bahrain imprisons protester for being critical of the prime minister on Twitter.

July 09, 2012

A prominent Bahraini protest leader, Nabeel Rajab, was sentenced to three months in prison for a tweet criticizing the prime minister,Khalifah ibn Sulman al-Khalifah. (al-Khalifah is the uncle of King Hamad bin Isa who is depicted in the picture above. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any pictures of al-Khalifah getting punched.)

Rajab has been a central figure in organizing protests during 16 months of unrest in the Gulf Arab state. Majority Shi’ite Muslims have spearheaded calls for democratic reforms to limit the powers of the ruling Sunni Muslim Al Khalifa family.

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Final ruling on 11-year-old Bahraini prisoner reachedJuly 5, 2012
An 11-year-old boy accused of taking part in anti-government protests in Bahrain may remain at home but must be monitored by authorities, a court has ruled.
Ali Hasan’s case has been closely watched because he was one of the youngest demonstrators taken into custody in the unrest in the strategic Gulf island nation, which serves as the base for the US Navy’s 5th Fleet.
Bahrain has experienced more than 16 months of near daily protests in an uprising led by the kingdom’s Shiite majority. It seeks greater political rights from the Western-backed Sunni monarchy.
The juvenile court judge ruled that Hasan must be monitored by a social worker for a year, according to Bahraini authorities and the boy’s lawyer, Shahzalan Khamis. Visits will be scheduled once every six months.
Hasan was detained in May on charges of joining an illegal gathering and other claims related to the unrest. The government alleges he was involved in blocking roads three times on May 13.
He was allowed to return home on June 11 after a month in custody. The final ruling in his case was not reached until today.
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Read The People’s Record’s initial post about Hasan here.

Final ruling on 11-year-old Bahraini prisoner reached
July 5, 2012

An 11-year-old boy accused of taking part in anti-government protests in Bahrain may remain at home but must be monitored by authorities, a court has ruled.

Ali Hasan’s case has been closely watched because he was one of the youngest demonstrators taken into custody in the unrest in the strategic Gulf island nation, which serves as the base for the US Navy’s 5th Fleet.

Bahrain has experienced more than 16 months of near daily protests in an uprising led by the kingdom’s Shiite majority. It seeks greater political rights from the Western-backed Sunni monarchy.

The juvenile court judge ruled that Hasan must be monitored by a social worker for a year, according to Bahraini authorities and the boy’s lawyer, Shahzalan Khamis. Visits will be scheduled once every six months.

Hasan was detained in May on charges of joining an illegal gathering and other claims related to the unrest. The government alleges he was involved in blocking roads three times on May 13.

He was allowed to return home on June 11 after a month in custody. The final ruling in his case was not reached until today.

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Read The People’s Record’s initial post about Hasan here.

Bahrain Opposition Leaders Targeted and Injured by Oppressive Regime

June 23, 2012

Bahraini riot police fired tear gas, stun grenades and rubber bullets Friday, injuring the head of the Shiite majority’s main political bloc while trying to break up protests in the country’s capital, the opposition said.

Al Wefaq’s secretary-general Sheik Ali Salman told The Associated Press he was hit in the shoulder and back by either a tear gas canister or stun grenade during demonstrations in Manama, which are common following Friday prayers. He had red welts on his skin but seemed otherwise in good health. Al Wefaq had earlier said that rubber bullets had caused the injury.

He said he was leading about 40 protesters on the way to a march when they encountered police who ordered them to disperse and then started firing into the crowd.

Hassan al-Marzooq, another opposition leader, was hit in the neck by a rubber bullet, an Al Wefaq statement said. He has since been taken to a private hospital in the capital for treatment.

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