Parti Québécois leader: Tuition hikes, Bill 78 will be repealedSeptember 5, 2012
 Student leaders have been assured by the Parti Québécois that their promise to cancel the tuition hike and repeal Bill 78 will be honoured once the newly elected party takes power in Quebec City.
“We had a call from a PQ aide this morning,” said Martine Desjardins, president of the Fédération étudiante universitaire du Québec. “They said they will reimburse any students who have already paid.”
She said the call was a relief for students, who were concerned that a minority PQ government might be blocked from making those changes.
“Although we will really celebrate when there is a decree, this is really a victory for our cause,” said Desjardins.
As many as 200,000 students were boycotting classes this winter and spring as students vehemently protested the Liberals’ plan to proceed with tuition increases of $254 a year for seven years this fall. This showdown with Premier Jean Charest during the “Printemps Érable” was very likely what sparked the unusual call for a summer election.
Desjardins believes social peace is a good possibility with the PQ in power and said students are happily preparing for an Estates General summit on higher education that the PQ promised in its election platform.
“We’ve been asking for that for years,” she said on Wednesday. “It is our best chance to prove we were right and to ensure there is a tuition freeze that endures.”
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Parti Québécois leader: Tuition hikes, Bill 78 will be repealed
September 5, 2012

 Student leaders have been assured by the Parti Québécois that their promise to cancel the tuition hike and repeal Bill 78 will be honoured once the newly elected party takes power in Quebec City.

“We had a call from a PQ aide this morning,” said Martine Desjardins, president of the Fédération étudiante universitaire du Québec. “They said they will reimburse any students who have already paid.”

She said the call was a relief for students, who were concerned that a minority PQ government might be blocked from making those changes.

“Although we will really celebrate when there is a decree, this is really a victory for our cause,” said Desjardins.

As many as 200,000 students were boycotting classes this winter and spring as students vehemently protested the Liberals’ plan to proceed with tuition increases of $254 a year for seven years this fall. This showdown with Premier Jean Charest during the “Printemps Érable” was very likely what sparked the unusual call for a summer election.

Desjardins believes social peace is a good possibility with the PQ in power and said students are happily preparing for an Estates General summit on higher education that the PQ promised in its election platform.

“We’ve been asking for that for years,” she said on Wednesday. “It is our best chance to prove we were right and to ensure there is a tuition freeze that endures.”

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Thousands continue to rally in Montreal after failed tuition talksJune 3, 2012
Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Montreal in Canada to protest against a planned tuition fee hike after talks between student groups and Quebec government officials collapsed.
The mass rally, organized by the CLASSE student association, was held on Saturday as thousands of student protesters and their supporters convened at the base of Mount Royal near McGill University in Montreal. The protest was the first since the latest tuition negotiations with Quebec Premier Jean Charest’s government broke down Thursday. CLASSE said some 10,000 people were marching by Saturday late afternoon in the biggest protest since the start of the tuition crisis in February. "It’s to continue to rally and show that we are still motivated even if summer is on its way," CLASSE leader Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois told reporters before the start of the protest. "This isn’t a student strike, it’s a society waking up,” read a banner at the front of the march. 
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March on, Quebec!

Thousands continue to rally in Montreal after failed tuition talks
June 3, 2012

Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Montreal in Canada to protest against a planned tuition fee hike after talks between student groups and Quebec government officials collapsed.

The mass rally, organized by the CLASSE student association, was held on Saturday as thousands of student protesters and their supporters convened at the base of Mount Royal near McGill University in Montreal. 

The protest was the first since the latest tuition negotiations with Quebec Premier Jean Charest’s government broke down Thursday. 

CLASSE said some 10,000 people were marching by Saturday late afternoon in the biggest protest since the start of the tuition crisis in February. 

"It’s to continue to rally and show that we are still motivated even if summer is on its way," CLASSE leader Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois told reporters before the start of the protest. "This isn’t a student strike, it’s a society waking up,” read a banner at the front of the march. 

Source

March on, Quebec!

Who’s Who of the Quebec Student Movement: Jeanne Reynolds & Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, CLASSE (Coalition large de l’association pour une solidarite syndicale etudiante) student leadersJune 2, 2012
CLASSE spokespersons Jeanne Reynolds and Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois have become outspoken revolutionary voices indicative of the Quebec Student Movement. With  red felt squares pinned to their shirts, the student leaders have articulated the demands of the thousands of students, unions, teachers and residents marching throughout the streets of Canada every day. 
On Thursday, student groups demanded a tuition freeze, but were rejected by government officials. Although university tuition in Quebec is the lowest in Canada, many Quebecois fear this is the first step toward an American for-profit education system. The proposed hike is $254 each year for seven years. 
CLASSE called for a massive demonstration in Quebec today. This is the 40th straight day of protests. 
-G.Razo
See thepeoplesrecord.com’s Who’s Who posts for the Occupy Movement.

Who’s Who of the Quebec Student Movement: Jeanne Reynolds & Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, CLASSE (Coalition large de l’association pour une solidarite syndicale etudiante) student leaders
June 2, 2012

CLASSE spokespersons Jeanne Reynolds and Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois have become outspoken revolutionary voices indicative of the Quebec Student Movement. With  red felt squares pinned to their shirts, the student leaders have articulated the demands of the thousands of students, unions, teachers and residents marching throughout the streets of Canada every day. 

On Thursday, student groups demanded a tuition freeze, but were rejected by government officials. Although university tuition in Quebec is the lowest in Canada, many Quebecois fear this is the first step toward an American for-profit education system. The proposed hike is $254 each year for seven years. 

CLASSE called for a massive demonstration in Quebec today. This is the 40th straight day of protests. 

-G.Razo

See thepeoplesrecord.com’s Who’s Who posts for the Occupy Movement.

­On Monday, over 500 lawyers, notaries and other legal professionals, dressed in their courtroom gowns, walked in silence through the streets of Canada’s second-largest city. 
Hundreds of lawyers have marched through Montreal in a subdued challenge to a new bill that harshly limits public protests. Canada’s province of Quebec has gone through 106 days of massive actions, which started as student outrage over tuition hikes.
The black-robed parade protested Bill 78, an emergency law that lays down strict government regulations for demonstrations numbering over 50 people. The lawyers were cheered by crowds; many onlookers shouting “Merci!”
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­On Monday, over 500 lawyers, notaries and other legal professionals, dressed in their courtroom gowns, walked in silence through the streets of Canada’s second-largest city.

Hundreds of lawyers have marched through Montreal in a subdued challenge to a new bill that harshly limits public protests. Canada’s province of Quebec has gone through 106 days of massive actions, which started as student outrage over tuition hikes.

The black-robed parade protested Bill 78, an emergency law that lays down strict government regulations for demonstrations numbering over 50 people. The lawyers were cheered by crowds; many onlookers shouting “Merci!

Source