The Dallas Commune is trying to raise money & awareness for their intentional community. A GoFundMe account has been created to support the community which serves as a politically-conscious, multi-racial, queer-friendly space in the Dallas area. 

For sustainable movement building, healing, nurturing, intentional, conscious spaces are necessary. Support the community here

350,000 to 500,000 people take to the streets of Dallas, Texas & demand immigration reform & a more just life in the United States
May 6, 2013

Thousands gathered Sunday in downtown Dallas to call for an immigration system overhaul as the Senate considers a proposal to legalize some of the estimated 11 million people who are in the U.S. unlawfully.

At the front of a march that began at the Cathedral Shrine of Our Virgin of Guadalupe were Catholic Bishop Kevin J. Farrell, an immigrant from Ireland, and Domingo García, a Dallas lawyer and one of the demonstration’s organizers.

“This nation was founded and built on immigrants, and we must continue to always welcome the immigrant in our midst,” Bishop Farrell said as the crowd clapped. The bishop drew more applause when he switched to Spanish and said he prayed that the nation’s leaders “accept and treat every person with justice.”

The march stretched for several blocks, bringing out families, college students and other supporters of the cause. A crowd estimate wasn’t available from police, but the turnout was a fraction of a similar march in 2006 that police said drew 350,000 to 500,000 people.

When the marchers arrived at Dallas City Hall, a Cinco de Mayo festival paused as the Pledge of Allegiance was recited and “The Star-Spangled Banner” was sung.

Dallas County Commissioner Elba García told the crowd: “We want immigration reform now. No more excuses!” Her husband, Domingo García, added, “The march is not over until President Obama signs an immigration bill.”

Angel Mondragon, an immigrant from Mexico City, carried a handmade placard that read, “Gays also want an immigration reform.” Mondragon said he loves the U.S. “I am gay and I have more opportunity here. People give me more respect here.” But the Senate measure doesn’t provide a provision that recognizes same-sex bi-national couples — a fact highlighted by various gay advocacy groups on the national level.

Some marchers and speakers noted the recent record deportations in the U.S. of about 400,000 a year. Hector Flores, a past national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, and Roberto Corona, an immigrant leader demanded that deportations should end. Through hard work within the United States, Corona said, “we have earned this immigration reform.”

Source

Dallas protests organized against naming Southern Methodist University library after war criminal George W. BushApril 24, 2013
Former President George W. Bush will step back into the spotlight on Thursday to dedicate his presidential library, along with President Barack Obama and former U.S. presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush.
The dedication will be the first meeting of the five living presidents since January 2009. First Lady Michelle Obama, former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former First Lady Barbara Bush, wife of George H.W. Bush and mother of George W. Bush, are expected to attend.
The 43rd president of the United States, Republican Bush left office during the Great Recession and has mostly kept out of the public eye since Democrat Obama’s inauguration in January 2009.
The George W. Bush Presidential Center at Southern Methodist University has been designed to examine the issues of George W. Bush’s presidency, including the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and the subsequent invasion of Iraq.
A new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll showed that 44 percent of Americans surveyed view Bush negatively compared to 35 percent who think favorably of him. But an expert on presidential history thinks the library and museum could help alter any negative perception.
Source
So here are the events organized for today from Occupy Dallas:
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. – Peacekeeper Training & Pre-rally Briefing Angelika Theater, 5321 E. Mockingbird Ln, Dallas, Tx, 75206.2:00 p.m. – Creative Action, Zero Tolerance for Torture: Meet at entrance to Mockingbird DART Station, 5465 E. Mockingbird Lane, Dallas, 75206.7:45 p.m. – “Body of War” film screening; introduction by co-director and executive producer Phil Donahue and comments by veteran Tomas Young by via Skype. Angelika Theater, 5321 E. Mockingbird Ln, Dallas, Tx, 75206. Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.10:30 p.m. – Play and Dance at Dallas’ Oldest Drum Jam!10pm ’til ?? Across the Street Bar, 5625 SMU Blvd, Dallas, TX 75026 (just 2 blocks north on access road from the Angelika). Hosted by Michael Kinney.
There will also be a demonstration against the Keystone XL pipeline since Obama will be in attendance. Click here for the Facebook event page.
The photo ad above is a CODEPINK ad that was rejected by the Dallas Morning News because it claims Bush never lied about the Iraq War. 

Dallas protests organized against naming Southern Methodist University library after war criminal George W. Bush
April 24, 2013

Former President George W. Bush will step back into the spotlight on Thursday to dedicate his presidential library, along with President Barack Obama and former U.S. presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush.

The dedication will be the first meeting of the five living presidents since January 2009. First Lady Michelle Obama, former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former First Lady Barbara Bush, wife of George H.W. Bush and mother of George W. Bush, are expected to attend.

The 43rd president of the United States, Republican Bush left office during the Great Recession and has mostly kept out of the public eye since Democrat Obama’s inauguration in January 2009.

The George W. Bush Presidential Center at Southern Methodist University has been designed to examine the issues of George W. Bush’s presidency, including the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and the subsequent invasion of Iraq.

A new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll showed that 44 percent of Americans surveyed view Bush negatively compared to 35 percent who think favorably of him. But an expert on presidential history thinks the library and museum could help alter any negative perception.

Source

So here are the events organized for today from Occupy Dallas:

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. – Peacekeeper Training & Pre-rally Briefing Angelika Theater, 5321 E. Mockingbird Ln, Dallas, Tx, 75206.

2:00 p.m. – Creative Action, Zero Tolerance for Torture: Meet at entrance to Mockingbird DART Station, 5465 E. Mockingbird Lane, Dallas, 75206.

7:45 p.m. – “Body of War” film screening; introduction by co-director and executive producer Phil Donahue and comments by veteran Tomas Young by via Skype. Angelika Theater, 5321 E. Mockingbird Ln, Dallas, Tx, 75206. Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

10:30 p.m. – Play and Dance at Dallas’ Oldest Drum Jam!10pm ’til ?? Across the Street Bar, 5625 SMU Blvd, Dallas, TX 75026 (just 2 blocks north on access road from the Angelika). Hosted by Michael Kinney.

There will also be a demonstration against the Keystone XL pipeline since Obama will be in attendance. Click here for the Facebook event page.

The photo ad above is a CODEPINK ad that was rejected by the Dallas Morning News because it claims Bush never lied about the Iraq War. 

Ealier in the week I went to an action after work, disrupting the Dallas Area Rapid Transit board meeting„ in support of equal benefits for the LGBTQ workers employed by  DART. The board recently voted to delay providing equal benefits. Here’s some text from the event-page on Facebook:

Dallas Area Rapid Transit has again delayed a vote on adding domestic partner benefits for its LGBT employees, this time to see how the U.S. Supreme Court rules on marriage equality.

Rightfully, as tax payers and members of the LGBT and ally community we are outraged!

Resource Center Dallas has promised to have speakers address the board at every single board meeting between now and the court ruling.

Please join us in a show of support for Resource Center Dallas, LGBT families and marriage equality at the DART board room (483 N. Field St.Dallas TX, 75202) Tuesday, April 9th at 6:30pm. Please wear red in support of equality. When one of our scheduled speakers addresses the board, we will all stand with them in a show of unity and strength.
 
I’m the big funny looking guy at the front of the first picture, clutching my invisible pearls. You better sissy that posture.
 
 

The People’s Record News Update: This week in the fight to decriminalize across the United States!
March 20, 2013

  • In Maryland, the Maryland Senate votes to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana, while a House committee considers legalizing as much as an ounce. The marijuana debate has expanded beyond medical uses to recreational ones. The Maryland Senate approved a bill that reduces small amounts of marijuana from criminal possession to a civil fine Tuesday. A bill in the House goes even further.

    The bill legalizes the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and older. It removes all penalties for possession of up to one ounce and allows adults to grow up to three plants. The prospects of any of the marijuana bills making it through both chambers and to the governor’s desk for his signature remain uncertain. A Senate bill decriminalizing marijuana up to 10 grams now moves to the House. Source
  • In Dallas, members of NORML, the nation’s largest group that advocates the legalization of marijuana protested along Greenville Avenue near the Old Town Shopping center in Dallas this weekend. It was estimated that about 100 members are here at the Dallas St. Patrick’s Parade and Festival. The group was denied a permit to march in be parade. Source
  • In Atlanta, marijuana activists gathered in Midtown at this weekend’s Southern Cannabis Reform Conference to unite and discuss how to reform antiquated marijuana laws. Several pro-marijuana groups gathered at the Spring4th Center in Midtown to promote the idea of drug decriminalization and discuss ways to improve community outreach. The two-day summit was organized by Peachtree National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Georgia Campaign for Access, Reform and Education (CARE), the American Cannabis Coalition, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, and Georgia NORML, among others. Source
  • In New Hampshire, advocates of medical marijuana won overwhelming support Wednesday in the House for a bill that would sanction five marijuana dispensaries and allow patients or caregivers to grow up to three plants for medical use.

    The bipartisan vote of 286-64 marked the fourth time in six years such a medical marijuana bill has won House approval. Two previous measures were vetoed by then-Gov. John Lynch; a third was killed in the Senate. Source
  • In New York City, a new report released today by the Drug Policy Alliance and the Marijuana Arrest Research Project documents the astonishing number of hours the New York City Police Department has spent arresting and processing hundreds of thousands of people for low-level misdemeanor marijuana possession arrests over the last 11 years. The report finds that NYPD used approximately 1,000,000 hours of police officer time making marijuana possession arrests during Mayor Bloomberg’s tenure. These are hours that police officers might have otherwise have spent investigating rape or wall street banker’s or conducting internal investigations regarding the NYPDs habitual racism & brutality.  Source
  • In Florida, two top Democratic fundraisers have committed to providing the money and know-how to get the question of legalizing medical marijuana on the state ballot in 2014.  Just a few months ago, the initiative to legalize could barely afford to photocopy the petition. Now, it has commissioned a poll and plans to hire a company to manage a $10 million campaign. Source
darthnickels

Hannah and landowner Eleanor Fairchild were standing in front of heavy equipment in an attempt to halt construction of the Keystone XL pipeline on Fairchild’s farm in Winnsboro, a town about 100 miles east of Dallas. They were arrested for criminal trespassing and taken to the Wood County Jail, Bassis said. Hannah also faces a charge of resisting arrest, according to jail records.

Let’s repeat that: Eleanor Fairchild, 78, was arrested for standing on her own property.

Hannah and landowner Eleanor Fairchild were standing in front of heavy equipment in an attempt to halt construction of the Keystone XL pipeline on Fairchild’s farm in Winnsboro, a town about 100 miles east of Dallas. They were arrested for criminal trespassing and taken to the Wood County Jail, Bassis said. Hannah also faces a charge of resisting arrest, according to jail records.

Let’s repeat that: Eleanor Fairchild, 78, was arrested for standing on her own property.

Terrorists in blue: How police maintain a system of racism & inequalityJuly 30, 2012
"To some Negroes, police have come to symbolize white power, white racism and white repression. And the fact is that many police do reflect and express these white attitudes. The atmosphere of hostility and cynicism is reinforced by a widespread belief among Negroes in the existence of police brutality and in a ‘double standard’ of justice and protection—one for Negroes and one for whites—a deep hostility between the police and ghetto…was a primary cause of the riots."
The passage quoted above was from a government-commissioned investigation into the causes of urban rebellions throughout the 1960s. For four years, from 1964 through 1968, hundreds of thousands of African Americans rose up against the racism and injustice across the U.S. In dozens of cities, the causes were the same: unemployment, substandard housing, and police brutality among many others.
This report was published in 1968, and yet the description of the police’s relationship to Black communities sounds very familiar. The only significant difference now is that in many urban areas, Black and Latino cops make up a larger part of the police forces.



WHAT YOU CAN DO

Stand with family members of victims of police brutality. Find out more about the National Alliance of Parents Against Police Violence on Facebook.




In some cities, there have even been Black police commissioners and superintendents along with Black political representatives, whether it be mayors, city council members or other ranking officials. These changes in the demographics of the police and city administrations that govern them haven’t changed the way that police departments regularly occupy, harass, intimidate and terrorize communities of color.
The reason behind this continuity is something that people in these communities already know: the police do not exist to protect and serve but are here to maintain racism and inequality.
This isn’t a conspiracy theory but is demonstrated in multiple ways, whether it is the disproportionate way that Blacks are arrested for drug crimes compared to whites or the way in which African Americans and Latinos are “legally” stopped for no reason at all.
The New York Police Department’s policy of stopping and frisking young men of color has resulted in literally hundreds of thousands of stops for random searches in hopes of finding contraband. In more than 90 percent of the stops, nothing is ever found, but the possibility of being stopped is a way of intimidating and controlling the movement and presence of Blacks and Latinos outside of spaces they are presumed not to belong.
Police operate in Black and brown communities as if the Bill of Rights does not exist—randomly stopping people for no reason, conducting searches without consent, and arresting and holding people with no charges. It is also infuriating because they operate with impunity. It is next to impossible to have a dirty cop charged with a crime or even disciplined for illegal or unethical behavior because the cops police themselves.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
BEYOND THE daily harassment, more than ever, the police are being used to hem in the potential for protest and resistance to the social crisis that is consuming Black communities across the country.
Black America is being ravaged by unemployment, growing rates of poverty, public school closures, and rental evictions and home foreclosures, to name only the most extreme conditions. In the absence of any real solutions to the economic crisis in communities hit the hardest, more police violence and intimidation are prescribed to keep them in check.
In Chicago, for example, growing poverty and disillusionment with any notion of social mobility in this society has given way to desperation and horrible violence across the city’s Black neighborhoods, but instead of addressing what is painfully obvious—some of the highest rates of poverty and unemployment in the U.S.—local officials periodically suggest new, esoteric policing strategies to address crime.
These policies include neighborhood sweeps of young men, a growing number of surveillance cameras, and an increased police presence in these neighborhoods. These measures, of course, do nothing about crime except add to the number of young Black men with criminal records and thus increase the likelihood that they will never get employment, exacerbating the central problems of unemployment and poverty.
Not only can’t the police do anything about the conditions that give rise to crime but they actually contribute to it. In Chicago, the police have been found to be involved in crime rings that sell drugs and guns.
The combination of growing racial and economic inequality with aggressive policing and the criminalization of Black youth is resulting in even more police violence and even murder at the hand of the cops. According to a report published by the Malcolm X Grassroots Collective, since January 2012, 110 African American men and women have been murdered either by the police, security guards or white vigilantes—almost a person every two days.
Despite the continuity over time of police violence, there’s a perception that it’s getting worse. Because of social media and networking, it’s easier for recordings of police terror to “go viral” and be seen across the country in a matter of hours.
The media initially ignored the murder of Trayvon Martin, but word of the racist killing of the Florida teenager exploded via social media, and the case morphed into a national symbol of racism and police corruption.
Protests against a police riot in Anaheim, Calif., were captured on video, and people around the country were able to see what the police tried to cover up. The mainstream news reported that police offered to buy cell phones from those who recorded the police actions for fear that word would get out.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
THESE ACTIONS point to a greater reality that, while police terrorism is intensifying, so is the willingness to confront it and organize against it. The time is ripe for a movement against the police.
In New York City, activist organizing and an emergent movement against stop and frisk has the NYPD on the ropes, and the potential to end that legalized racism is within sight. Earlier in the summer, more than 13,000 people in New York marched silently to dramatically demonstrate against stop and frisk.
In Anaheim, where the police executed a young Latino man in cold blood, community members rebelled and lashed out at cop terror. In fact, after an evening of being shot with rubber bullets and arrests, community members demonstrated inside of the police department demanding justice.
In Chicago, a “people’s hearing” against police violence brought out more than 100 people, despite city officials’ efforts to thwart the meeting by forcing it to relocate. Across the country, communities large and small are organizing vigils, marches, demonstrations and community organizing meetings to speak out against police violence and murder against African Americans and Latinos.
At the center of much of this organizing are the family members of the victims of police murder who bravely and heroically are finding each other across the country and joining forces to demand justice and speak out against this racist terrorism. The outpouring of protest and organizing in response to the lynching of Trayvon Martin showed that the potential for a movement against police brutality, murder and corruption is vast.
Police terror may be a permanent feature of a system that is as economically unequal and unjust as this one, but that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t make demands for police accountability and beyond. Our growing movement should demand an immediate end to the legalized racial profiling of stop-and-frisk programs in New York City and everywhere else variations of it are used.
We should call for federal investigations of local police murder and brutality cases because we know that the police can’t police themselves. We should demand elected and accountable police review boards that can independently investigate police crimes. We should demand an end to laws that criminalized the filming or audio recording of police as these are often the only means capture “proof” of their crimes.
There has never been a more urgent need to build a movement against racist, police terrorism in the U.S. There is another reality to consider as well. If the police continue to kill Black men and women with impunity, the possibility of the kinds of urban rebellions that shook American society in the 1960s is a distinct possibility.
One must consider that this isn’t the 1960s, but it’s the 21st century—and there’s a Black president and a Black attorney general and people surely expect more. Moreover, in just the last several days near- riots have broken out in Southern California and Dallas, Texas, as the police, growing more brazen in their disregard for Black and brown life, have executed young men in broad daylight, out in the open for all to see.
In Dallas, people watched the police shoot a man in the back as he was running away. Hundreds of people gathered in response to the Dallas Police Department’s deployment of a SWAT team and riot police.
There’s a growing feeling of exhaustion with the vicious racism and brutality of cops across the country and the pervasive silence that shrouds it—and people are beginning to rise against it.
Source
Written by Keeanga Yamahtta-Taylor, a racial justice activist & author in Chicago. Watch her speak about racial justice here.

Terrorists in blue: How police maintain a system of racism & inequality
July 30, 2012

"To some Negroes, police have come to symbolize white power, white racism and white repression. And the fact is that many police do reflect and express these white attitudes. The atmosphere of hostility and cynicism is reinforced by a widespread belief among Negroes in the existence of police brutality and in a ‘double standard’ of justice and protection—one for Negroes and one for whites—a deep hostility between the police and ghetto…was a primary cause of the riots."

The passage quoted above was from a government-commissioned investigation into the causes of urban rebellions throughout the 1960s. For four years, from 1964 through 1968, hundreds of thousands of African Americans rose up against the racism and injustice across the U.S. In dozens of cities, the causes were the same: unemployment, substandard housing, and police brutality among many others.

This report was published in 1968, and yet the description of the police’s relationship to Black communities sounds very familiar. The only significant difference now is that in many urban areas, Black and Latino cops make up a larger part of the police forces.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Stand with family members of victims of police brutality. Find out more about the National Alliance of Parents Against Police Violence on Facebook.

In some cities, there have even been Black police commissioners and superintendents along with Black political representatives, whether it be mayors, city council members or other ranking officials. These changes in the demographics of the police and city administrations that govern them haven’t changed the way that police departments regularly occupy, harass, intimidate and terrorize communities of color.

The reason behind this continuity is something that people in these communities already know: the police do not exist to protect and serve but are here to maintain racism and inequality.

This isn’t a conspiracy theory but is demonstrated in multiple ways, whether it is the disproportionate way that Blacks are arrested for drug crimes compared to whites or the way in which African Americans and Latinos are “legally” stopped for no reason at all.

The New York Police Department’s policy of stopping and frisking young men of color has resulted in literally hundreds of thousands of stops for random searches in hopes of finding contraband. In more than 90 percent of the stops, nothing is ever found, but the possibility of being stopped is a way of intimidating and controlling the movement and presence of Blacks and Latinos outside of spaces they are presumed not to belong.

Police operate in Black and brown communities as if the Bill of Rights does not exist—randomly stopping people for no reason, conducting searches without consent, and arresting and holding people with no charges. It is also infuriating because they operate with impunity. It is next to impossible to have a dirty cop charged with a crime or even disciplined for illegal or unethical behavior because the cops police themselves.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

BEYOND THE daily harassment, more than ever, the police are being used to hem in the potential for protest and resistance to the social crisis that is consuming Black communities across the country.

Black America is being ravaged by unemployment, growing rates of poverty, public school closures, and rental evictions and home foreclosures, to name only the most extreme conditions. In the absence of any real solutions to the economic crisis in communities hit the hardest, more police violence and intimidation are prescribed to keep them in check.

In Chicago, for example, growing poverty and disillusionment with any notion of social mobility in this society has given way to desperation and horrible violence across the city’s Black neighborhoods, but instead of addressing what is painfully obvious—some of the highest rates of poverty and unemployment in the U.S.—local officials periodically suggest new, esoteric policing strategies to address crime.

These policies include neighborhood sweeps of young men, a growing number of surveillance cameras, and an increased police presence in these neighborhoods. These measures, of course, do nothing about crime except add to the number of young Black men with criminal records and thus increase the likelihood that they will never get employment, exacerbating the central problems of unemployment and poverty.

Not only can’t the police do anything about the conditions that give rise to crime but they actually contribute to it. In Chicago, the police have been found to be involved in crime rings that sell drugs and guns.

The combination of growing racial and economic inequality with aggressive policing and the criminalization of Black youth is resulting in even more police violence and even murder at the hand of the cops. According to a report published by the Malcolm X Grassroots Collective, since January 2012, 110 African American men and women have been murdered either by the police, security guards or white vigilantes—almost a person every two days.

Despite the continuity over time of police violence, there’s a perception that it’s getting worse. Because of social media and networking, it’s easier for recordings of police terror to “go viral” and be seen across the country in a matter of hours.

The media initially ignored the murder of Trayvon Martin, but word of the racist killing of the Florida teenager exploded via social media, and the case morphed into a national symbol of racism and police corruption.

Protests against a police riot in Anaheim, Calif., were captured on video, and people around the country were able to see what the police tried to cover up. The mainstream news reported that police offered to buy cell phones from those who recorded the police actions for fear that word would get out.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

THESE ACTIONS point to a greater reality that, while police terrorism is intensifying, so is the willingness to confront it and organize against it. The time is ripe for a movement against the police.

In New York City, activist organizing and an emergent movement against stop and frisk has the NYPD on the ropes, and the potential to end that legalized racism is within sight. Earlier in the summer, more than 13,000 people in New York marched silently to dramatically demonstrate against stop and frisk.

In Anaheim, where the police executed a young Latino man in cold blood, community members rebelled and lashed out at cop terror. In fact, after an evening of being shot with rubber bullets and arrests, community members demonstrated inside of the police department demanding justice.

In Chicago, a “people’s hearing” against police violence brought out more than 100 people, despite city officials’ efforts to thwart the meeting by forcing it to relocate. Across the country, communities large and small are organizing vigils, marches, demonstrations and community organizing meetings to speak out against police violence and murder against African Americans and Latinos.

At the center of much of this organizing are the family members of the victims of police murder who bravely and heroically are finding each other across the country and joining forces to demand justice and speak out against this racist terrorism. The outpouring of protest and organizing in response to the lynching of Trayvon Martin showed that the potential for a movement against police brutality, murder and corruption is vast.

Police terror may be a permanent feature of a system that is as economically unequal and unjust as this one, but that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t make demands for police accountability and beyond. Our growing movement should demand an immediate end to the legalized racial profiling of stop-and-frisk programs in New York City and everywhere else variations of it are used.

We should call for federal investigations of local police murder and brutality cases because we know that the police can’t police themselves. We should demand elected and accountable police review boards that can independently investigate police crimes. We should demand an end to laws that criminalized the filming or audio recording of police as these are often the only means capture “proof” of their crimes.

There has never been a more urgent need to build a movement against racist, police terrorism in the U.S. There is another reality to consider as well. If the police continue to kill Black men and women with impunity, the possibility of the kinds of urban rebellions that shook American society in the 1960s is a distinct possibility.

One must consider that this isn’t the 1960s, but it’s the 21st century—and there’s a Black president and a Black attorney general and people surely expect more. Moreover, in just the last several days near- riots have broken out in Southern California and Dallas, Texas, as the police, growing more brazen in their disregard for Black and brown life, have executed young men in broad daylight, out in the open for all to see.

In Dallas, people watched the police shoot a man in the back as he was running away. Hundreds of people gathered in response to the Dallas Police Department’s deployment of a SWAT team and riot police.

There’s a growing feeling of exhaustion with the vicious racism and brutality of cops across the country and the pervasive silence that shrouds it—and people are beginning to rise against it.

Source

Written by Keeanga Yamahtta-Taylor, a racial justice activist & author in Chicago. Watch her speak about racial justice here.

More information released on fatal Dallas PD shootingJuly 26, 2012
Dallas police have released their initial report on a fatal officer-involved shooting in South Dallas, and community leaders have called for an outside investigation.
James Harper, 31, was shot and killed by Officer Brian Rowden during a physical altercation, police said.
Some local pastors and civil rights leaders are questioning the officer’s use of force. They say there should be more citizen oversight of officer-involved shootings.
Police Chief David Brown said police would conduct a thorough investigation into the shooting. The district attorney and a grand jury will review the case to decide if the shooting was justified.
Harper’s family said Wednesday that family members want all of the facts before publicly talking about the case.
Police officers were in the neighborhood on Wednesday to make sure things remained calm, but there were no incidents. Hundreds of people gathered near the crime scene soon after the shooting as rumors that Harper had been shot in the back circulated.
According to the Dallas County medical examiner’s preliminary report, Harper died of a gunshot wound. The report does not specify where Harper was shot.
Report Includes Info on Apparent Bogus 911 Call
The initial report from police includes a transcript of the 911 call that led officers to the house that Harper allegedly fled.
Three officers went to the house on Bourquin Street to respond to a 911 call about a kidnapping.
The caller told the operator: “I seen like five or six Hispanics with some guns just walked this black dude in the house with his hands tied up.”
"They were yelling at him like they were going to kill him or something," the caller said.
Police Chief David Brown on Tuesday said the call appeared to be bogus. The four men inside the house were not Hispanic, and investigators did not find anyone tied up in the house.
According to the initial police report, four men ran out of the house. The officers saw a gun on a table inside the house.
Harper, who was unarmed, jumped three fences while fleeing, the report said. He started beating on Rowden in a neighboring yard. Rowden drew his weapon and shot Harper, the report said.
Brown said Tuesday night that Harper and Rowden had three separate physical altercations during the foot chase.
"And so the third time, the officer became exhausted," he said. "He was by himself with no one close. He had to do what he felt appropriate, which we will review."
One of the four men, Arthur Dixon, was arrested.
Questions Raised About Use of Force in Shooting
A group of pastors and civil rights leaders said Dallas should have a citizens review board to investigate all officer-involved shootings.
"Last month, someone in North Dallas had a confrontation with police officers and they shot him with a beanbag. In the southern sector, they use bullets. What is the difference? Why the disparity in when the police should use a bullet or when they should use their Tasers or a beanbag?" said the Rev. Ronald Wright, of Justice Seekers Texas.
Wright said he was not defending a drug dealer but was questioning how he died.
"If the officer felt like his life was in danger, why didn’t he call for back up or why didn’t he cease his chase [as] opposed to taking the action that he took?" he said.
Wright also called on the New Black Panther Party, which has been critical of police, to go back to the Black Panther Party’s history of running drug dealers out of communities.
Councilwoman Carolyn Davis, who represents the neighborhood, said people in the community have called to complain about drug houses.
She said it is too soon to make conclusions about the fatal shooting.
"Let’s let Chief Brown do his investigation, finish his investigation and then come up with all the facts," she said. "I don’t want to speak on something that I don’t have enough information on before I make this hasty decision."
Neighbors said Harper’s death is the eighth fatal police shooting of a suspect so far this year, compared to two fatal shootings in all of 2011.
"There’s an underlying issue here that we have to deal with," Davis said.
Mayor Mike Rawlings said his confidence in Brown and the police department “has never been higher.”
"As this case is examined, let me be clear — Dallas has a zero tolerance for civil rights violations as well as a zero tolerance for bad people dealing drugs," he said.
Brown said Tuesday night that assaults on officers by suspects are up this year by a significant amount even though overall crime is down.
SourcePhoto
This information does not justify DPD killing an unarmed man. The People’s Record will continue to post developments about Harper’s death. 

More information released on fatal Dallas PD shooting
July 26, 2012

Dallas police have released their initial report on a fatal officer-involved shooting in South Dallas, and community leaders have called for an outside investigation.

James Harper, 31, was shot and killed by Officer Brian Rowden during a physical altercation, police said.

Some local pastors and civil rights leaders are questioning the officer’s use of force. They say there should be more citizen oversight of officer-involved shootings.

Police Chief David Brown said police would conduct a thorough investigation into the shooting. The district attorney and a grand jury will review the case to decide if the shooting was justified.

Harper’s family said Wednesday that family members want all of the facts before publicly talking about the case.

Police officers were in the neighborhood on Wednesday to make sure things remained calm, but there were no incidents. Hundreds of people gathered near the crime scene soon after the shooting as rumors that Harper had been shot in the back circulated.

According to the Dallas County medical examiner’s preliminary report, Harper died of a gunshot wound. The report does not specify where Harper was shot.

Report Includes Info on Apparent Bogus 911 Call

The initial report from police includes a transcript of the 911 call that led officers to the house that Harper allegedly fled.

Three officers went to the house on Bourquin Street to respond to a 911 call about a kidnapping.

The caller told the operator: “I seen like five or six Hispanics with some guns just walked this black dude in the house with his hands tied up.”

"They were yelling at him like they were going to kill him or something," the caller said.

Police Chief David Brown on Tuesday said the call appeared to be bogus. The four men inside the house were not Hispanic, and investigators did not find anyone tied up in the house.

According to the initial police report, four men ran out of the house. The officers saw a gun on a table inside the house.

Harper, who was unarmed, jumped three fences while fleeing, the report said. He started beating on Rowden in a neighboring yard. Rowden drew his weapon and shot Harper, the report said.

Brown said Tuesday night that Harper and Rowden had three separate physical altercations during the foot chase.

"And so the third time, the officer became exhausted," he said. "He was by himself with no one close. He had to do what he felt appropriate, which we will review."

One of the four men, Arthur Dixon, was arrested.

Questions Raised About Use of Force in Shooting

A group of pastors and civil rights leaders said Dallas should have a citizens review board to investigate all officer-involved shootings.

"Last month, someone in North Dallas had a confrontation with police officers and they shot him with a beanbag. In the southern sector, they use bullets. What is the difference? Why the disparity in when the police should use a bullet or when they should use their Tasers or a beanbag?" said the Rev. Ronald Wright, of Justice Seekers Texas.

Wright said he was not defending a drug dealer but was questioning how he died.

"If the officer felt like his life was in danger, why didn’t he call for back up or why didn’t he cease his chase [as] opposed to taking the action that he took?" he said.

Wright also called on the New Black Panther Party, which has been critical of police, to go back to the Black Panther Party’s history of running drug dealers out of communities.

Councilwoman Carolyn Davis, who represents the neighborhood, said people in the community have called to complain about drug houses.

She said it is too soon to make conclusions about the fatal shooting.

"Let’s let Chief Brown do his investigation, finish his investigation and then come up with all the facts," she said. "I don’t want to speak on something that I don’t have enough information on before I make this hasty decision."

Neighbors said Harper’s death is the eighth fatal police shooting of a suspect so far this year, compared to two fatal shootings in all of 2011.

"There’s an underlying issue here that we have to deal with," Davis said.

Mayor Mike Rawlings said his confidence in Brown and the police department “has never been higher.”

"As this case is examined, let me be clear — Dallas has a zero tolerance for civil rights violations as well as a zero tolerance for bad people dealing drugs," he said.

Brown said Tuesday night that assaults on officers by suspects are up this year by a significant amount even though overall crime is down.

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This information does not justify DPD killing an unarmed man. The People’s Record will continue to post developments about Harper’s death. 

I’ll be going to the protest tomorrow (Wednesday - July 25) outside the Dallas Police Department @ 2PM - anyone in the DFW want to join me? 
Please reblog and let everyone you know in North Texas, particularly close to Dallas that this is happening.  
July 24, 2012
The protest is in response to this brutal incident.
Hundreds massed outside Dixon’s Grocery a block or two from where the dead man lay face down in a field.


Sandra Harper said her son, James Harper, 31, sold marijuana out of a house in the neighborhood. “I lost my son over a bag of damn weed,” she said. “I knew it was going to happen but I didn’t know when.”

She and at least a dozen family members wailed and screamed at a line of SWAT officers carrying assault rifles.

When the police said nothing in return, Sandra Harper and her daughter walked crying up Dixon Street trying to find the body. They only met more police.

I’ll be going to the protest tomorrow (Wednesday - July 25) outside the Dallas Police Department @ 2PM - anyone in the DFW want to join me?

Please reblog and let everyone you know in North Texas, particularly close to Dallas that this is happening. 

July 24, 2012

The protest is in response to this brutal incident.

Hundreds massed outside Dixon’s Grocery a block or two from where the dead man lay face down in a field.

Sandra Harper said her son, James Harper, 31, sold marijuana out of a house in the neighborhood. “I lost my son over a bag of damn weed,” she said. “I knew it was going to happen but I didn’t know when.”

She and at least a dozen family members wailed and screamed at a line of SWAT officers carrying assault rifles.

When the police said nothing in return, Sandra Harper and her daughter walked crying up Dixon Street trying to find the body. They only met more police.

BREAKING: One person killed in officer-involved shooting in Dallas

July 24, 2012

The incident was reported near Mural Ln. and Barber Ave. around 5 p.m. on Tuesday afternoon.

One person was confirmed dead in a field adjacent to a horse barn near the scene on Barber Ave.

After the shooting, a crowd formed around crime scene tape that was stretched along the perimeter near the scene at Bourquin.

Dozens of officers are on the scene forming a line that blocks the crowd from entering the area of the shooting.

According to the official Dallas PD Twitter, response teams from seven substations have been called to the scene of the shooting. The Dallas County Sheriff’s Department was also called in to help police.

Dallas police are shutting down Dixon at Scyene to stop inbound traffic. The officers say too many onlookers are pouring into the area.

EDIT: The man who was killed was 31-year old James Harper. via

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Yet another person dead because of police brutality. The People’s Record will continue to post updates on this murder as new information becomes available.