Hi P.R., Could I get you to blog this? A call to action by Adbusters at Goldman Sachs. I really want this effort to take off. Thank you!

http://www.adbusters.org/campaigns/goldman

I got the email with this campaign this morning, glad you’re excited about it too. It  sounds like it could be great, although it’s really hit or miss with Adbusters. I’ll publish a prettier, more reblog-inspiring version in a little bit as well. Thanks for submitting.

-Robert
ThePeoplesRecord.com
Facebook.com/ThePeoplesRecord

Thousands protest austerity amid general strike in Athens
October 18, 2012

The latest demonstrations against austerity measures in Greece have led to some clashes between protesters and police.

Four thousand officers have been deployed to protect parliament and government ministries.

Thousands of people gathered in central Athens amid a general strike, the second major walkout in three weeks.

A 65-year-old activist at the demonstration died of an apparent heart attack. He was not thought to have been close to the main clashes with police.

Many protesters want to send a clear message to EU leaders saying ‘no’ to further austerity.

Ships have stayed in port, public transport in the capital has been disrupted, hospitals have been operating on emergency-only, while public offices and many shops have remained closed.

Several marches have been planned to coincide with the 24-hour stoppage, called by the two largest unions.

Greece is planning 11.5 billion euros of cuts to secure its next batch of bailout aid.

With the country due to run out of money next month, the government feels it has little choice but to implement the cuts which include a drastic reduction in welfare and health spending.

80,000 Parisians rally over austerity measuresSeptember 30, 2012
Thousands of people have taken to the streets in the French capital Paris to express their outrage at the European Union’s fiscal pact and government’s plans for further spending cuts.
More than 80,000 protesters marched through central Paris on Sunday, chanting slogans against imposed austerity and belt-tightening policies. The demonstration comes before the French parliament’s debate this week on a European fiscal treaty. The treaty will help the establishment of European Stability Mechanism bailout fund. European leaders expect the fund to appease the on-going Eurozone sovereign debt crisis, which has shaken financial markets both within and outside the monetary union.
France’s main conservative opposition party and most Socialist lawmakers support the treaty. Far-left parties, the Greens and some dissident Socialists, however, oppose it. Socialist President Francois Hollande — who was elected in the spring — suffers a great deal of political pressure and his popularity has been declining according to recent surveys.
Source

80,000 Parisians rally over austerity measures
September 30, 2012

Thousands of people have taken to the streets in the French capital Paris to express their outrage at the European Union’s fiscal pact and government’s plans for further spending cuts.

More than 80,000 protesters marched through central Paris on Sunday, chanting slogans against imposed austerity and belt-tightening policies. 

The demonstration comes before the French parliament’s debate this week on a European fiscal treaty. 

The treaty will help the establishment of European Stability Mechanism bailout fund. 

European leaders expect the fund to appease the on-going Eurozone sovereign debt crisis, which has shaken financial markets both within and outside the monetary union.

France’s main conservative opposition party and most Socialist lawmakers support the treaty. Far-left parties, the Greens and some dissident Socialists, however, oppose it. 

Socialist President Francois Hollande — who was elected in the spring — suffers a great deal of political pressure and his popularity has been declining according to recent surveys.

Source

Portugal protests erupt over austerity measuresSeptember 29, 2012
Thousands of Portuguese protested on Saturday against austerity, stepping up their opposition to the country’s 78-billion-euro bailout ahead of new spending cuts and tax hikes to be announced in the government’s 2013 draft budget.
The peaceful protest organized by the CGTP union came after the center-right government ignited widespread anger this month with a hike in social security taxes that threatened to end Portugal’s so far high social acceptance for austerity.
Facing criticism from unions, opposition politicians and businesses alike, the government reversed the tax hike. But it is now rushing to find alternative measures to adopt in its 2013 budget to ensure the country meets fiscal goals under its bailout from the European Union, European Central Bank and IMF, the so-called troika.
Protesters marched through downtown Lisbon, shouting “Let the fight continue” and carried banners reading “Go to hell Troika, we want our lives back.”
"A year ago the prime minister told us the solution to the country’s problems was the agreement with the troika," shouted CGTP head Armenio Carlos in a speech.
"But we have already seen this film in Greece, this is a road without an exit, pushing us toward the precipice,” Carlos told the marchers that crowded into Lisbon’s main Praca de Comercio square on the banks of the Tagus River.
The protest in Portugal came after a week of similar anti-austerity marches in Greece, Spain andItaly as southern Europeans face increasingly grim economic conditions under hardship sparked by the euro debt crisis.
Carlos said the protest was one of the largest organized by the CGTP, Portugal’s biggest union, in recent years but he gave no figure of the number of people present. Praca de Comercio square has a capacity of about 100,000 people but it was not completely full on Saturday.
The protests were smaller than nationwide marches on September 15, immediately after the tax hike was announced, which prompted an estimated 500,000 people to take to the streets.
Portugal’s unemployment rate has hit record levels above 15 percent as the country descended this year into its worst recession since the 1970s under the weight of spending cuts and tax hikes.
Anger by the Portuguese at austerity is likely to rise further as the government now expects the recession to extend into next year with few signs of economic growth emerging from the bailout plan.
The government has to present its 2013 budget by the middle of October.
Source

Portugal protests erupt over austerity measures
September 29, 2012

Thousands of Portuguese protested on Saturday against austerity, stepping up their opposition to the country’s 78-billion-euro bailout ahead of new spending cuts and tax hikes to be announced in the government’s 2013 draft budget.

The peaceful protest organized by the CGTP union came after the center-right government ignited widespread anger this month with a hike in social security taxes that threatened to end Portugal’s so far high social acceptance for austerity.

Facing criticism from unions, opposition politicians and businesses alike, the government reversed the tax hike. But it is now rushing to find alternative measures to adopt in its 2013 budget to ensure the country meets fiscal goals under its bailout from the European Union, European Central Bank and IMF, the so-called troika.

Protesters marched through downtown Lisbon, shouting “Let the fight continue” and carried banners reading “Go to hell Troika, we want our lives back.”

"A year ago the prime minister told us the solution to the country’s problems was the agreement with the troika," shouted CGTP head Armenio Carlos in a speech.

"But we have already seen this film in Greece, this is a road without an exit, pushing us toward the precipice,” Carlos told the marchers that crowded into Lisbon’s main Praca de Comercio square on the banks of the Tagus River.

The protest in Portugal came after a week of similar anti-austerity marches in Greece, Spain andItaly as southern Europeans face increasingly grim economic conditions under hardship sparked by the euro debt crisis.

Carlos said the protest was one of the largest organized by the CGTP, Portugal’s biggest union, in recent years but he gave no figure of the number of people present. Praca de Comercio square has a capacity of about 100,000 people but it was not completely full on Saturday.

The protests were smaller than nationwide marches on September 15, immediately after the tax hike was announced, which prompted an estimated 500,000 people to take to the streets.

Portugal’s unemployment rate has hit record levels above 15 percent as the country descended this year into its worst recession since the 1970s under the weight of spending cuts and tax hikes.

Anger by the Portuguese at austerity is likely to rise further as the government now expects the recession to extend into next year with few signs of economic growth emerging from the bailout plan.

The government has to present its 2013 budget by the middle of October.

Source

Athenians protest in largest anti-austerity demonstrations since new government
September 26, 2012

A rally in the Greek capital turned violent when protesters in Syntagma Square lobbed Molotov cocktails at police, who retaliated by firing tear gas at the demonstrators.

Security forces also reportedly used flashbang grenades and pepper spray to push protesters back from the parliament building. According to Greek newspaper Kathimerin, the police had been ordered to refrain from using chemicals against protesters.

Around 70,000 people, as estimated by Reuters, gathered in front of the parliament for the country’s biggest anti-austerity protest since the new government came to power.

EU, IMF out!" shouted the angry crowd. 

For the past two-to-three years we’ve been living an incredible social catastrophe,” one of the protesters told Agence France Presse. “My salary has been cut by 50 percent. I have two children and tomorrow I don’t know if I’ll have a job.

Clashes erupted in different parts of Athens Syntagma Square, with demonstrators throwing fire bombs at police.

Witnesses reported smoke rising over the square as security forces dispersed most of the protesters. Some remained, and continued the demonstration; others relocated to the streets of Panepistimiou and Benaki, where again started clashing with riot police.

Some 120 arrest were made throughout the capital. Police say protesters smashed bus stop kiosks and set fire to garbage cans. 

Several people sustained injuries. 

More than 3,000 police officers – double the usual number – were deployed in the capital of Athens to counter the protesters. 

On Wednesday, Greece was gripped by a 24-hour general strike, which halted transit and other industries nationwide. Flights and trains were suspended, shops were shuttered and the hospitals were forced to rely on emergency staffing. The strike was called by the country’s two largest trade unions, representing half of Greece’s workers. 

As many as 350,000 Greeks poured out into streets across the country to protest austerity, estimates the civil servants union ADEDY. 

In the second largest city of Thessaloniki, around 18,000 demonstrators rallied. Greeks wrote on Twitter that large numbers of protesters are rallying peacefully in the streets. Earlier demonstrations there saw youths setting fire to debris, burning an EU flag, and then clashing with riot police.

Source
Photo 1, 2, 3, 4

Quebec teachers to join students against government plansJune 30, 2012
Student protests in Canada’s eastern province of Quebec are expected to build up steam before the end of the summer with teachers becoming involved in the demonstrations against the government’s plans.
Quebec teachers will reportedly engage in student protests as differences with the provincial government over their demands still remain unsettled. With talks over the teachers’ demands ending in failure, Quebec Premier Jean Charest’s plan to reopen universities in August to finish the postponed winter term could be undercut. The teachers’ union has called on the government to employ a few hundred temporary teachers to help professors manage their workload during the intensive fall plan. The union has also threatened to stop working if their demands are not met by the government. "We’re ready to do our part in all of this," Micheline Thibodeau, vice-president of the teachers’ federation said. "We’re just trying to provide the resources so that our students succeed." 
Source

Quebec teachers to join students against government plans
June 30, 2012

Student protests in Canada’s eastern province of Quebec are expected to build up steam before the end of the summer with teachers becoming involved in the demonstrations against the government’s plans.

Quebec teachers will reportedly engage in student protests as differences with the provincial government over their demands still remain unsettled. 

With talks over the teachers’ demands ending in failure, Quebec Premier Jean Charest’s plan to reopen universities in August to finish the postponed winter term could be undercut. 

The teachers’ union has called on the government to employ a few hundred temporary teachers to help professors manage their workload during the intensive fall plan. 

The union has also threatened to stop working if their demands are not met by the government. 

"We’re ready to do our part in all of this," Micheline Thibodeau, vice-president of the teachers’ federation said. "We’re just trying to provide the resources so that our students succeed." 

Source

Largest student protest of 2012 in Chile draws 150,000June 29, 2012
Rain slowed, but did not stop massive files of students, workers and protesters as they marched past the presidential palace to protest education costs and profiteering Thursday. The Confederation of Chilean Students (Confech), the university student organization that coordinated the protest, estimated the number of protesters at 150,000.
“The government is right to be worried because we are dealing with a minister who bows to business,” said Confech Spokesperson Gabriel Boric at the march’s closing ceremony. “We want to say that while this happens, we will not be quiet. We went from a military dictatorship to a market dictatorship.”In Chile, the majority of education costs are borne by private citizens. Confech and other student organizations have called for the government to take a more active investment.In addition to the movement’s broad call for education reforms, many protesters specifically spoke against profiteering in the educational system. At least seven universities are under investigation for taking money from the instruction and putting it into the pockets of its directors and executives.This was the movement’s third major protest of the year, but first sanctioned route past La Moneda presidential palace. It was also the biggest of the three, according to the Confech estimate.
Source

Largest student protest of 2012 in Chile draws 150,000
June 29, 2012

Rain slowed, but did not stop massive files of students, workers and protesters as they marched past the presidential palace to protest education costs and profiteering Thursday. The Confederation of Chilean Students (Confech), the university student organization that coordinated the protest, estimated the number of protesters at 150,000.

“The government is right to be worried because we are dealing with a minister who bows to business,” said Confech Spokesperson Gabriel Boric at the march’s closing ceremony. “We want to say that while this happens, we will not be quiet. We went from a military dictatorship to a market dictatorship.”

In Chile, the majority of education costs are borne by private citizens. Confech and other student organizations have called for the government to take a more active investment.

In addition to the movement’s broad call for education reforms, many protesters specifically spoke against profiteering in the educational system. At least seven universities are under investigation for taking money from the instruction and putting it into the pockets of its directors and executives.

This was the movement’s third major protest of the year, but first sanctioned route past La Moneda presidential palace. It was also the biggest of the three, according to the Confech estimate.

Source

A student upsurge in MexicoJune 14, 2012
An unexpected wave of protests led by university students has broken out in cities across Mexico, centered on the media’s promotion of presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the party that ruled Mexico for 70 years until 2000.
Students from different social backgrounds, and from both public and private universities have for the first time formed a united front in leading a nonviolent struggle of conscience against mainstream media conglomerates Televisa, TV Azteca, Milenio and Radio Formula, including their anchors, broadcasters and journalists. But the protests’ main focus on the media’s telegenic chosen candidate, Peña Nieto.
Anti-Peña Nieto sentiment publicly began to make headlines at the Universidad Iberoamericana on May 11, when the visiting candidate was loudly and embarrassingly mocked by students.
The candidate’s visit to the campus was previously canceled on two occasions—apparently out of fear that he would stumble, as he had at the International Book Fair in Guadalajara last December, when he was unable to remember the authors of books that had been important to his life.
Once he arrived on campus in May, Peña Nieto was forced to leave through the back door as students ran him off the premises chanting: “Out ignorant, out Peña Nieto, the Ibero doesn’t want you!” In a university that mostly caters to the upper middle class and wealthy, the protest was another unexpected blow to the PRI candidate’s already flawed reputation.
With the help of a friendly media, Peña Nieto and the PRI immediately retaliated in accusing Josephina Vasquez Mota of the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and center-left candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the Progressive Front of jointly conspiring against him by accusing the two of fomenting intolerance.
When the media echoed those claims, 131 students who had participated in the protest posted a video in which they showed their student IDs. This led to the launch of a Twitter feed, #YoSoy132—I am 132.
Source

A student upsurge in Mexico
June 14, 2012

An unexpected wave of protests led by university students has broken out in cities across Mexico, centered on the media’s promotion of presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the party that ruled Mexico for 70 years until 2000.

Students from different social backgrounds, and from both public and private universities have for the first time formed a united front in leading a nonviolent struggle of conscience against mainstream media conglomerates Televisa, TV Azteca, Milenio and Radio Formula, including their anchors, broadcasters and journalists. But the protests’ main focus on the media’s telegenic chosen candidate, Peña Nieto.

Anti-Peña Nieto sentiment publicly began to make headlines at the Universidad Iberoamericana on May 11, when the visiting candidate was loudly and embarrassingly mocked by students.

The candidate’s visit to the campus was previously canceled on two occasions—apparently out of fear that he would stumble, as he had at the International Book Fair in Guadalajara last December, when he was unable to remember the authors of books that had been important to his life.

Once he arrived on campus in May, Peña Nieto was forced to leave through the back door as students ran him off the premises chanting: “Out ignorant, out Peña Nieto, the Ibero doesn’t want you!” In a university that mostly caters to the upper middle class and wealthy, the protest was another unexpected blow to the PRI candidate’s already flawed reputation.

With the help of a friendly media, Peña Nieto and the PRI immediately retaliated in accusing Josephina Vasquez Mota of the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and center-left candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the Progressive Front of jointly conspiring against him by accusing the two of fomenting intolerance.

When the media echoed those claims, 131 students who had participated in the protest posted a video in which they showed their student IDs. This led to the launch of a Twitter feed, #YoSoy132—I am 132.

Source