Breanna Manning lawyer in struggle to have government documents releasedJune 7, 2012
Breanna Manning, (also known as Bradley Manning) the US soldier accused of being the source of the biggest leak of state secrets in American history, has won a partial victory in her battle to force the government to disclose vital information that could help the soldiers’ defence.
The judge presiding over the trial at Fort Meade in Maryland has ordered the US government to hand over several confidential documents relating to the massive leak to the whistleblower website Wikileaks.In particular, the Obama administration must now disclose to Manning’s lawyers some of the damage assessments it carried out into the impact of the leak on US interests around the world.
Should those assessments reveal that the US government found that the fallout from WikiLeaks was limited, that could be used by Manning’s defence to argue innocence against some of the charges, such as aiding the enemy. If the soldier is found guilty, the information might then prove invaluable in reducing any sentence.
Source

Breanna Manning lawyer in struggle to have government documents released
June 7, 2012

Breanna Manning, (also known as Bradley Manning) the US soldier accused of being the source of the biggest leak of state secrets in American history, has won a partial victory in her battle to force the government to disclose vital information that could help the soldiers’ defence.

The judge presiding over the trial at Fort Meade in Maryland has ordered the US government to hand over several confidential documents relating to the massive leak to the whistleblower website Wikileaks.

In particular, the Obama administration must now disclose to Manning’s lawyers some of the damage assessments it carried out into the impact of the leak on US interests around the world.

Should those assessments reveal that the US government found that the fallout from WikiLeaks was limited, that could be used by Manning’s defence to argue innocence against some of the charges, such as aiding the enemy. If the soldier is found guilty, the information might then prove invaluable in reducing any sentence.

Source

This day in Wikileaks - June 3, 2012
WikiLeaks has been financially blockaded without process for 548 days.
Julian Assange has been under house arrest without charge for 545 days.  
Bradley Manning has been in jail without trial for 742 days.  A secret Grand Jury on WikiLeaks has been active in the US for 628 days.

This day in Wikileaks - June 3, 2012

WikiLeaks has been financially blockaded without process for 548 days.
Julian Assange has been under house arrest without charge for 545 days.  
Bradley Manning has been in jail without trial for 742 days.  
A secret Grand Jury on WikiLeaks has been active in the US for 628 days.
Julian Assange to be extradited to Sweden May 30, 2012
The Britain Supreme Court ruled earlier this morning that Wikileaks founder and journalist Julian Assange would be extradited to Sweden to be questioned about sexual misconduct allegations. The 5-2 ruling comes after a group of prosecutors ruled the European Arrest Warrant seeking his extradition was valid. The Australian journalist has been fighting this ruling since December 2010 and has been under house arrest in England for 540 days without being charged for a single crime.
Assange has 14 days to leave the UK to head to Sweden. But this extradition brings up concerns of the possibility of Sweden’s secretive pre-trial procedures that will be most likely hidden from the media and the public. Assange believes the rape allegations from two women are politically-motivated smear campaigns to tarnish the reputability of Wikileaks.
Questions of what will happen to Assange in the coming proceedings also point to the role of the United States. There is fear that once Sweden has tried the journalist, they will extradite him to the U.S. where he can be charged with espionage & possibly conspiracy, then jailed for life. The U.S. has already taken measures to bring down Assange, calling him a terrorist & questioning Wikileaks supporters throughout the world. Secretary of the State Hillary Clinton plans to travel to Sweden this upcoming weekend, an unusual business trip coming at a convenient time to possibly make negotiations about Assange under the table.
Assange and his lawyers can still file an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights if it agrees to hear his case within 14 days. He can put the extradition on hold, which could push the final verdict back a few months. In the situation that Assange & the Wikileaks team are unable to publish, the journalist has already said he has a network of thousands of people ready to continue the whistleblower’s mission for government transparency. Supporters have downloaded a file encrypted with a code shatterproof even from governments. A key will be released to open the files & disseminate them if Assange cannot publish.
Updates will be published as they are released here on The People’s Record.
For information on May 30 Julian Assange rallies around the world, click here.
- G. Razo

Julian Assange to be extradited to Sweden 
May 30, 2012

The Britain Supreme Court ruled earlier this morning that Wikileaks founder and journalist Julian Assange would be extradited to Sweden to be questioned about sexual misconduct allegations. The 5-2 ruling comes after a group of prosecutors ruled the European Arrest Warrant seeking his extradition was valid. The Australian journalist has been fighting this ruling since December 2010 and has been under house arrest in England for 540 days without being charged for a single crime.

Assange has 14 days to leave the UK to head to Sweden. But this extradition brings up concerns of the possibility of Sweden’s secretive pre-trial procedures that will be most likely hidden from the media and the public. Assange believes the rape allegations from two women are politically-motivated smear campaigns to tarnish the reputability of Wikileaks.

Questions of what will happen to Assange in the coming proceedings also point to the role of the United States. There is fear that once Sweden has tried the journalist, they will extradite him to the U.S. where he can be charged with espionage & possibly conspiracy, then jailed for life. The U.S. has already taken measures to bring down Assange, calling him a terrorist & questioning Wikileaks supporters throughout the world. Secretary of the State Hillary Clinton plans to travel to Sweden this upcoming weekend, an unusual business trip coming at a convenient time to possibly make negotiations about Assange under the table.

Assange and his lawyers can still file an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights if it agrees to hear his case within 14 days. He can put the extradition on hold, which could push the final verdict back a few months. In the situation that Assange & the Wikileaks team are unable to publish, the journalist has already said he has a network of thousands of people ready to continue the whistleblower’s mission for government transparency. Supporters have downloaded a file encrypted with a code shatterproof even from governments. A key will be released to open the files & disseminate them if Assange cannot publish.

Updates will be published as they are released here on The People’s Record.

For information on May 30 Julian Assange rallies around the world, click here.

- G. Razo

Breanna Manning has been in prison for two years today
Also known as Bradley, Manning has been subjected to torture over the past two years, including being locked up for 11 months straight in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day - before she was even charged with a crime.
Her pre-trial hearing will be June 8 in Fort Meade, Virginia. 
For the most recent updates on Manning’s case, click here.

Breanna Manning has been in prison for two years today

Also known as Bradley, Manning has been subjected to torture over the past two years, including being locked up for 11 months straight in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day - before she was even charged with a crime.

Her pre-trial hearing will be June 8 in Fort Meade, Virginia. 

For the most recent updates on Manning’s case, click here.

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication 
Breanna Manning: Updates on the Whistleblower’s Trial (photo source)May 28, 2012United States Army soldier Breanna Manning, also known as Bradley Manning, has become one of the most influential figures in the quest for government transparency across the world. He was arrested in Iraq in May 2010 on suspicion of leaking classified government cables to activist publishers, Wikileaks. Cables he leaked revealed corruption in Kenya, human rights violations in Guantanamo Bay, footage of journalists and civilians being gunned down by U.S. military, expenditures of the Afghanistan war and other intelligence documents. Information Manning leaked to Wikileaks is considered to be one of the stimuli that sparked the revolution in Tunisia and in other countries throughout the Middle East.He is being detailed in Virginia on 22 charges, including a capital offense of “aiding the enemy,” which if found guilty, could imprison Manning in jail for life. Currently, Manning’s defense team says he is being denied a fair trial because of withheld information that may help prove his innocence. His lawyer has laid out the inconsistencies and violations of a fair trial. The military has not searched its own files to find any evidence that may aid in his release, which is it legally obligated to complete. In addition, the Center for Constitutional Rights is petitioning the Army court of criminal appeals to open up more details about the case to the public and the media. Petitioners include Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman and Salon writer Glenn Greenwald. The secrecy behind the case is a clear violation of the First Amendment and cannot allow Manning to have a fair trial. Manning’s defense attorney has also called for 10 of the charges be dropped as they are “unconstitutionally vague or fail to state a prosecutable offense.” A military judge will review the charges and make a ruling at the pre-trial on June 8 in Fort Meade.
Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication 

Breanna Manning: Updates on the Whistleblower’s Trial (photo source)
May 28, 2012

United States Army soldier Breanna Manning, also known as Bradley Manning, has become one of the most influential figures in the quest for government transparency across the world. He was arrested in Iraq in May 2010 on suspicion of leaking classified government cables to activist publishers, Wikileaks. Cables he leaked revealed corruption in Kenya, human rights violations in Guantanamo Bay, footage of journalists and civilians being gunned down by U.S. military, expenditures of the Afghanistan war and other intelligence documents. Information Manning leaked to Wikileaks is considered to be one of the stimuli that sparked the revolution in Tunisia and in other countries throughout the Middle East.

He is being detailed in Virginia on 22 charges, including a capital offense of “aiding the enemy,” which if found guilty, could imprison Manning in jail for life.

Currently, Manning’s defense team says he is being denied a fair trial because of withheld information that may help prove his innocence. His lawyer has laid out the inconsistencies and violations of a fair trial. The military has not searched its own files to find any evidence that may aid in his release, which is it legally obligated to complete.

In addition, the Center for Constitutional Rights is petitioning the Army court of criminal appeals to open up more details about the case to the public and the media. Petitioners include Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman and Salon writer Glenn Greenwald. The secrecy behind the case is a clear violation of the First Amendment and cannot allow Manning to have a fair trial.

Manning’s defense attorney has also called for 10 of the charges be dropped as they are “unconstitutionally vague or fail to state a prosecutable offense.” A military judge will review the charges and make a ruling at the pre-trial on June 8 in Fort Meade.

Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.

New Wikileaks cables reveal U.S. targeting Julian Assange
THE WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange remains the target of a US government criminal investigation and the subject of US-Australian intelligence exchanges, Australian diplomatic cables obtained by the Herald reveal.
Australian diplomats have closely monitored the US Department of Justice investigation into WikiLeaks over the past 18 months. The embassy in Washington reported ”a broad range of possible charges are under consideration, including espionage and conspiracy”.
The diplomats dismiss Mr Assange’s claims that the US investigation is politically motivated retribution for WikiLeaks’ publication of leaked US military and diplomatic reports. They instead highlight US prosecutors’ claims that the alleged leaker, Bradley Manning, dealt directly with Mr Assange and ”data-mined” secret US databases ”guided by WikiLeaks’ list of ‘most wanted’ leaks”.

Full article

New Wikileaks cables reveal U.S. targeting Julian Assange

THE WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange remains the target of a US government criminal investigation and the subject of US-Australian intelligence exchanges, Australian diplomatic cables obtained by the Herald reveal.

Australian diplomats have closely monitored the US Department of Justice investigation into WikiLeaks over the past 18 months. The embassy in Washington reported ”a broad range of possible charges are under consideration, including espionage and conspiracy”.

The diplomats dismiss Mr Assange’s claims that the US investigation is politically motivated retribution for WikiLeaks’ publication of leaked US military and diplomatic reports. They instead highlight US prosecutors’ claims that the alleged leaker, Bradley Manning, dealt directly with Mr Assange and ”data-mined” secret US databases ”guided by WikiLeaks’ list of ‘most wanted’ leaks”.


Bradley Manning military trial: Group petitions for a more open court
The military trial of the WikiLeaks suspect Bradley Manning is being conducted amid far more secrecy than even the prosecution of the alleged 9/11 plotters in Guantanamo, a coalition of lawyers and media outlets protest.
Led by the New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights, the coalition has petitioned the Army court of criminal appeals calling for the court-martial against Manning to be opened up to the press and public. The group complains that the way the trial is being handled by the trial judge Colonel Denise Lind is a violation of the First Amendment of the constitution that requires public access unless the government can specifically demonstrate the need for secrecy.
The petition lists the many ways in which the public are being kept in the dark over the prosecution of Bradley Manning, who faces 22 charges related to the leaking of a vast trove of US state secrets to the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. He was arrested in May 2010 at a military base outside Baghdad where he was working as an intelligence analyst on suspicion of passing hundreds of thousands of US diplomatic cables as well as warlogs from Iraq and Afghanistan to the site.
Full article

Bradley Manning military trial: Group petitions for a more open court

The military trial of the WikiLeaks suspect Bradley Manning is being conducted amid far more secrecy than even the prosecution of the alleged 9/11 plotters in Guantanamo, a coalition of lawyers and media outlets protest.

Led by the New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights, the coalition has petitioned the Army court of criminal appeals calling for the court-martial against Manning to be opened up to the press and public. The group complains that the way the trial is being handled by the trial judge Colonel Denise Lind is a violation of the First Amendment of the constitution that requires public access unless the government can specifically demonstrate the need for secrecy.

The petition lists the many ways in which the public are being kept in the dark over the prosecution of Bradley Manning, who faces 22 charges related to the leaking of a vast trove of US state secrets to the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. He was arrested in May 2010 at a military base outside Baghdad where he was working as an intelligence analyst on suspicion of passing hundreds of thousands of US diplomatic cables as well as warlogs from Iraq and Afghanistan to the site.

Full article

A $14,800 Kickstarter campaign splashed downtown Washington D.C. with these posters. The ads are funded by EpicStep & the Bradley Manning Support Network, whose representatives said:
"The military has done its best to limit public exposure to Bradley Manning’s case by holding the trial at Ft. Meade, a relatively difficult location for the public to attend, and they have not released transcripts of the pretrial hearing, thereby limiting media exposure and making it difficult for laymen to follow the proceedings. Let’s bring the case back to Washington! … These ads will force government workers to remember WikiLeaks and Bradley Manning, remind them that the public is behind Bradley, and explain that what Bradley is accused of doing is a public good." 

A $14,800 Kickstarter campaign splashed downtown Washington D.C. with these posters. The ads are funded by EpicStep & the Bradley Manning Support Network, whose representatives said:

"The military has done its best to limit public exposure to Bradley Manning’s case by holding the trial at Ft. Meade, a relatively difficult location for the public to attend, and they have not released transcripts of the pretrial hearing, thereby limiting media exposure and making it difficult for laymen to follow the proceedings. Let’s bring the case back to Washington! … These ads will force government workers to remember WikiLeaks and Bradley Manning, remind them that the public is behind Bradley, and explain that what Bradley is accused of doing is a public good."