Syrians living in Yemen shout slogans against Syria’s President Bashar Al-Assad during a rally in Sanaa June 1, 2012. The rally was held to condemn last week’s massacre of more than 100 people in the Syrian town of Houla, which the United Nations said appears to have been the work of the Syrian army and pro-Assad militiamen. Damascus blamed the atrocity on the rebels. 

Syrians living in Yemen shout slogans against Syria’s President Bashar Al-Assad during a rally in Sanaa June 1, 2012. The rally was held to condemn last week’s massacre of more than 100 people in the Syrian town of Houla, which the United Nations said appears to have been the work of the Syrian army and pro-Assad militiamen. Damascus blamed the atrocity on the rebels. 

A turning point in Syria? (photo source)May 31, 2012
The latest massacre in Syria—which killed more than a 100 men, women and children in their homes in the city of Houla—is only the latest of the horrors that Syrians have been living through after they dared rise up against the 40-year dictatorship of the Assad family.
The question for the movement now is how to withstand the increasingly brutal repression and take the struggle forward.
The slaughter in Houla led to an international outcry, and the UN Security Council condemned the killings. Several Western countries expelled Syrian diplomats in protest, and advocates of U.S. and European military intervention seized the moment to call for air strikes against Syria. Yet despite the terrible human toll, international intervention in Syria will not make things better. The Syrian people do have the power to liberate themselves—and only they can do so.
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A turning point in Syria? (photo source)
May 31, 2012

The latest massacre in Syria—which killed more than a 100 men, women and children in their homes in the city of Houla—is only the latest of the horrors that Syrians have been living through after they dared rise up against the 40-year dictatorship of the Assad family.

The question for the movement now is how to withstand the increasingly brutal repression and take the struggle forward.

The slaughter in Houla led to an international outcry, and the UN Security Council condemned the killings. Several Western countries expelled Syrian diplomats in protest, and advocates of U.S. and European military intervention seized the moment to call for air strikes against Syria. Yet despite the terrible human toll, international intervention in Syria will not make things better. The Syrian people do have the power to liberate themselves—and only they can do so.

Source