Malaysian people fight election fraud; face state repression from Singapore
May 13, 2013

Vowing to “never surrender”, opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim called on Malaysians Wednesday to join in a nationwide protest tour against elections he said were stolen from the country’s people. He addressed a sea of supporters dressed in mourning black who filled a football stadium and spilled out into surrounding areas, swamping a suburb of the capital Kuala Lumpur in a gathering with a rock-concert atmosphere.

"We will go to every corner of this country," Anwar declared, prompting roars from the crowd. "We will continue to struggle and we will never surrender!"

The huge turnout and Anwar’s call for similar rallies across the country upped the ante in a campaign by the opposition to paint the elections as a fraudulent victory for the regime that has ruled Malaysia for 56 years. Anwar had already vowed a “fierce” campaign against Sunday’s poll result and said he would soon produce evidence of fraud by what he calls an “illegitimate” Barisan Nasional (National Front) government headed by premier Najib Razak. “BN has robbed the rights of the people. We will prove that they have lied in 30 parliamentary seats,” he told the ecstatic, multi-racial crowd.

Najib’s government has hotly denied the opposition’s allegations of cheating. It had earlier denounced the gathering in the 25,000-seat stadium, which was filled to its seating capacity and had at least twice that many on the football pitch. Thousands more were outside. Najib’s office had issued a statement before the rally saying it was “calculated to create unrest”.

But the crowd was more festive than angry, roaring for a succession of opposition leaders and clean-election activists as rally-goers waved opposition party flags and sounded vuvuzela horns. “I think they should re-do the election,” said university student Tan Han Hui. “I’m here to support democracy. I feel the election is so unfair and there are so many dirty tricks.”

Previous election-reform protests have ended in wild scenes, with police using tear gas and water cannon. Police had earlier threatened to arrest participants at Wednesday’s rally but with tension high over the country’s closest-ever election result, they backed off and little security presence was seen.

Anwar has battled Barisan since he was ousted from its top ranks in 1998 and jailed for six years on sex and corruption charges widely seen as trumped-up. The opposition leader, who had urged Malaysians across the country to wear black in protest, called for another rally in his northern home state of Penang on Saturday, with more to follow around Malaysia. Among other allegations, voters complained that indelible ink — meant to thwart multiple voting — easily washed off. Accounts of suspected foreign “voters” being confronted by angry citizens at polling centers also went viral online.

Anwar had earlier alleged a government scheme to fly tens of thousands of “dubious” and possibly foreign voters to flood key constituencies.
A report released Wednesday by two independent watchdogs said the polls were marred by pro-government bias and irregularities that indicate “serious flaws” in the electoral system. The Institute for Democracy and Economic Affairs and Centre for Public Policy Studies cited concerns including partisan use of government machinery, pro-government media bias and doubts over the integrity of voter rolls. The election was “only partially free and not fair”, the report said. In other words, the report found that the election was neither free nor fair.

The vote was touted as the first in which the opposition had a chance to unseat the ruling coalition, which has governed since independence in 1957. Barisan retained a firm parliamentary majority despite winning less than half the popular vote, a factor blamed on gerrymandering and Barisan tinkering with electoral districts, and adding to opposition supporters’ anger.

Both the United States and European Union congratulated Najib on his win but urged him to address reports of irregularities, while anti-graft watchdog Transparency International said the vote showed electoral reforms were “urgently required”.
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Malaysians in Singapore are facing political repression for demonstrating against the election results there. The protest here was illegal and those who knowingly organised and participated in such an illegal activity should face the consequences, said High Commissioner to Singapore Datuk Md Hussin Nayan. “I hope Malaysians working or studying in Singapore will reflect more on their situation before acting illegally,” he said. Md Hussin was responding to reports of the arrest of 21 Malaysians in the republic on Saturday, arrested for protesting in a ‘democracy’ and for not staying passive citizens at home.
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Malaysians protest persecution of MuslimsAugust 4, 2012
Thousands of people in Malaysia have taken to the streets in protest at the ongoing violence against the minority Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar.
The protestors gathered in front of the Myanmar Embassy to voice their outrage at the persecution and massacre of Muslims in the Southeast Asian country. They demanded a meeting with the officials of the Myanmar Embassy. Their request, however, was declined by the Myanmar’s officials. The demonstrators also called for an immediate end to the violence against Rohingyas. 
Reports say some 650 Rohingyas have been killed in the Rakhine state in the west of the country in recent months. This is while 1,200 others are missing and 80,000 more have been displaced.
The UN says decades of discrimination have left the Rohingyas stateless, with Myanmar implementing restrictions on their movement and withholding land rights, education, and public services from them. The world body has also described the Muslim community as the Palestine of Asia and one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. 
Earlier this week, the Human Rights Watch (HRW) condemned the Myanmar government for the killing of minority Rohingya Muslims during a recent wave of sectarian violence in the country.
“Burmese (Myanmarese) security forces committed killings, rape, and mass arrests against Rohingya Muslims after failing to protect both them and Arakan Buddhists during deadly sectarian violence in western Burma in June 2012,” the rights organization said in a report on Wednesday. HRW also called on Myanmar to “take urgent measures to end abuses by their forces, ensure humanitarian access, and permit independent international monitors to visit affected areas and investigate abuses.” The Buddhist-majority government of Myanmar refuses to recognize Rohingyas, who, it claims, are not natives, and classifies them as illegal migrants though the Rohingy as are said to be Muslim descendants of Persian, Turkish, Bengali, and Pathan origin, who migrated to Myanmar as early as the eighth century.
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Malaysians protest persecution of Muslims
August 4, 2012

Thousands of people in Malaysia have taken to the streets in protest at the ongoing violence against the minority Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar.

The protestors gathered in front of the Myanmar Embassy to voice their outrage at the persecution and massacre of Muslims in the Southeast Asian country. 

They demanded a meeting with the officials of the Myanmar Embassy. Their request, however, was declined by the Myanmar’s officials. 

The demonstrators also called for an immediate end to the violence against Rohingyas. 

Reports say some 650 Rohingyas have been killed in the Rakhine state in the west of the country in recent months. This is while 1,200 others are missing and 80,000 more have been displaced.


The UN says decades of discrimination have left the Rohingyas stateless, with Myanmar implementing restrictions on their movement and withholding land rights, education, and public services from them. 

The world body has also described the Muslim community as the Palestine of Asia and one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. 

Earlier this week, the Human Rights Watch (HRW) condemned the Myanmar government for the killing of minority Rohingya Muslims during a recent wave of sectarian violence in the country.


“Burmese (Myanmarese) security forces committed killings, rape, and mass arrests against Rohingya Muslims after failing to protect both them and Arakan Buddhists during deadly sectarian violence in western Burma in June 2012,” the rights organization said in a report on Wednesday. 

HRW also called on Myanmar to “take urgent measures to end abuses by their forces, ensure humanitarian access, and permit independent international monitors to visit affected areas and investigate abuses.” 

The Buddhist-majority government of Myanmar refuses to recognize Rohingyas, who, it claims, are not natives, and classifies them as illegal migrants though the Rohingy as are said to be Muslim descendants of Persian, Turkish, Bengali, and Pathan origin, who migrated to Myanmar as early as the eighth century.

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Vietnamese protest fights back as China rivals the United States for title of meanest imperial bully. 
July 1, 2012
Hundreds of Vietnamese demonstrated in Hanoi on Sunday against China’s moves to strengthen its claim to disputed islands in the South China Sea and its invitation to oil firms to bid for blocks in offshore areas that Vietnam claims as its territory.
The authorities in Vietnam rarely allow public demonstrations and some bloggers said security forces had warned them against attending the rally, but the police made no attempt to disperse people, Nguyen Quang A, one of the protesters said.
"We want to raise people’s awareness of China’s wrongful moves recently, and we have received applause from people in the streets," he said.
The authorities tolerated a series of protests over China’s territorial claims from June to August last year before the government put an end to them.
CNOOC, the parent of New York- and Hong Kong-listed CNOOC Ltd, issued a tender last Saturday to invite foreign companies to jointly develop nine blocks in the western part of the South China Sea.
Vietnam has called this move illegal because the blocks encroach on what it claims are its territorial waters.
"The area that the China National Offshore Oil Corporation announced to open for international bidding lies entirely within Vietnam’s 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone and continental shelf in accordance with the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea," Vietnamese Foreign Ministry spokesman Luong Thanh Nghi said on June 26.
"It is absolutely not a disputed area," he said.
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See other news from the last week by The People’s Record.

Vietnamese protest fights back as China rivals the United States for title of meanest imperial bully.

July 1, 2012

Hundreds of Vietnamese demonstrated in Hanoi on Sunday against China’s moves to strengthen its claim to disputed islands in the South China Sea and its invitation to oil firms to bid for blocks in offshore areas that Vietnam claims as its territory.

The authorities in Vietnam rarely allow public demonstrations and some bloggers said security forces had warned them against attending the rally, but the police made no attempt to disperse people, Nguyen Quang A, one of the protesters said.

"We want to raise people’s awareness of China’s wrongful moves recently, and we have received applause from people in the streets," he said.

The authorities tolerated a series of protests over China’s territorial claims from June to August last year before the government put an end to them.

CNOOC, the parent of New York- and Hong Kong-listed CNOOC Ltd, issued a tender last Saturday to invite foreign companies to jointly develop nine blocks in the western part of the South China Sea.

Vietnam has called this move illegal because the blocks encroach on what it claims are its territorial waters.

"The area that the China National Offshore Oil Corporation announced to open for international bidding lies entirely within Vietnam’s 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone and continental shelf in accordance with the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea," Vietnamese Foreign Ministry spokesman Luong Thanh Nghi said on June 26.

"It is absolutely not a disputed area," he said.

Source

See other news from the last week by The People’s Record.

Thousands of Rohingya Muslims protest at Burmese embassy in Kuala LumpurJune 16, 2012
Thousands of Rohingya Muslims gathered in the Malaysian capital, Kuala Lumpur, to call for an end to the violence in the western Rakhine state (formerly known as Arakan).
The emotional appeal was made outside the Burmese embassy in Kuala Lumpur, predominantly by Rohingya Muslims living in Malaysia, who make up the bulk of the 80,000 Burmese refugees in the country. Those protesting are calling for UN intervention and emergency medical assistance.
Described by mainstream media as ‘sectarian violence’ many activists and those targeted in the former independent state, have said that the violence is ethnic cleansing by the Rakhine Buddhists against the minority Rohingya Muslims.
Source

Thousands of Rohingya Muslims protest at Burmese embassy in Kuala Lumpur
June 16, 2012

Thousands of Rohingya Muslims gathered in the Malaysian capital, Kuala Lumpur, to call for an end to the violence in the western Rakhine state (formerly known as Arakan).

The emotional appeal was made outside the Burmese embassy in Kuala Lumpur, predominantly by Rohingya Muslims living in Malaysia, who make up the bulk of the 80,000 Burmese refugees in the country. Those protesting are calling for UN intervention and emergency medical assistance.

Described by mainstream media as ‘sectarian violence’ many activists and those targeted in the former independent state, have said that the violence is ethnic cleansing by the Rakhine Buddhists against the minority Rohingya Muslims.

Source

More than 500 people protested against the education loan scheme PTPTN as well as for free education in the streets of Kuala Lumpur yesterday (April 14th). PTPTN stands for the National Higher Education Fund Corporation.
The students first gathered in front of Masjid Jamek LRT station at 2pm. They then marched towards the Sogo shopping centre along Jalan Raja Laut. At 3pm, the crowd stopped in front of the Sogo shopping centre to hear speeches from student leaders.
Mandeep Singh, a former student (he did not disclose his university): “The PTPTN only drives the youth into debt. And not just the youth, but also their families!” he shouted. via

More than 500 people protested against the education loan scheme PTPTN as well as for free education in the streets of Kuala Lumpur yesterday (April 14th). PTPTN stands for the National Higher Education Fund Corporation.

The students first gathered in front of Masjid Jamek LRT station at 2pm. They then marched towards the Sogo shopping centre along Jalan Raja Laut. At 3pm, the crowd stopped in front of the Sogo shopping centre to hear speeches from student leaders.

Mandeep Singh, a former student (he did not disclose his university): “The PTPTN only drives the youth into debt. And not just the youth, but also their families!” he shouted. via