BREAKING: NYPD shoots a man dead in the middle of Times SquareAugust 12, 2012
New York City police shot and killed a knife-wielding suspect as he sought to evade them through Saturday afternoon traffic and pedestrians in New York’s Times Square, authorities said.
Police said on Sunday they approached Darrius Kennedy, 51, while he was smoking what appeared to be a marijuana cigarette. He became agitated, broke free from an officer’s grip and pulled from his pocket a knife with a six-inch (15-cm) blade, said police spokesman Paul Browne.
Kennedy headed south, weaving through dense pedestrian and vehicle traffic, as more police officers arrived at the scene.
"He was repeatedly told throughout this period to drop the knife and we have scores of witnesses who heard the officers doing that repeatedly," Browne told a press briefing.
Kennedy was pepper-sprayed six times but did not respond. After he was again told to drop the knife, two officers fired on him, Browne said.
Twelve shots were fired, and Kennedy was hit seven times — three times in the chest, twice in the left arm, once in the left calf and once in the groin. The two officers, who were not immediately identified, have been placed on administrative duty.
"Right when he pulled the knife, the cops drew their guns," Lincoln Rocha, 28, who was visiting from Brazil, told the New York Times newspaper. “Some people were crouching near an office building… But others took out the cellphone cameras to try and capture it.”
As police officers pursued Kennedy, dozens of onlookers, including Rocha, trailed behind, he told the newspaper.
Kennedy was later pronounced dead at Bellevue Hospital Center, Browne said.
The incident may stir additional controversy about the city’s so-called stop-and-frisk policies, which have been criticized as targeting racial minorities. Kennedy was black.
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NYPD continually proves itself to be the most dangerous gang. 

BREAKING: NYPD shoots a man dead in the middle of Times Square
August 12, 2012

New York City police shot and killed a knife-wielding suspect as he sought to evade them through Saturday afternoon traffic and pedestrians in New York’s Times Square, authorities said.

Police said on Sunday they approached Darrius Kennedy, 51, while he was smoking what appeared to be a marijuana cigarette. He became agitated, broke free from an officer’s grip and pulled from his pocket a knife with a six-inch (15-cm) blade, said police spokesman Paul Browne.

Kennedy headed south, weaving through dense pedestrian and vehicle traffic, as more police officers arrived at the scene.

"He was repeatedly told throughout this period to drop the knife and we have scores of witnesses who heard the officers doing that repeatedly," Browne told a press briefing.

Kennedy was pepper-sprayed six times but did not respond. After he was again told to drop the knife, two officers fired on him, Browne said.

Twelve shots were fired, and Kennedy was hit seven times — three times in the chest, twice in the left arm, once in the left calf and once in the groin. The two officers, who were not immediately identified, have been placed on administrative duty.

"Right when he pulled the knife, the cops drew their guns," Lincoln Rocha, 28, who was visiting from Brazil, told the New York Times newspaper. “Some people were crouching near an office building… But others took out the cellphone cameras to try and capture it.”

As police officers pursued Kennedy, dozens of onlookers, including Rocha, trailed behind, he told the newspaper.

Kennedy was later pronounced dead at Bellevue Hospital Center, Browne said.

The incident may stir additional controversy about the city’s so-called stop-and-frisk policies, which have been criticized as targeting racial minorities. Kennedy was black.

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NYPD continually proves itself to be the most dangerous gang. 

Segregation continues in urban schools (photo)July 11, 2012
Nearly 60 years have passed since the Supreme Court made its landmark Brown vs. Board of Education decision, legally ending school segregation across the U.S. Today, the legacy of school segregation persists, as racial isolation remains the reality of many students nationwide.Though it is expected that the U.S. population will shift from a white-majority to a minority-majority by 2046, currently most students do not see that diversity reflected in their school experience. Nationally, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, 52 percent of black students and 58 percent of Latino students attend school where minority students make up 75 percent or more of the entire student body.
In Chicago, America’s most segregated city, it’s typical for students to go through their entire K-12 education without ever having met a classmate of another race, as “GOOD reported this week.  In a recent radio interview on a local station, a Chicago student described having thought that schools were still legally segregated, based solely on her surroundings.
Advocates for reform argue that the incentives to foster greater diversity in schools are clear: Exposing students to racially and culturally diverse environments prepares them for the world outside school doors. Recent studies have also shown that students fare better academically in schools with greater levels of socioeconomic diversity.
Throughout the past decade, public school reformers have focused largely on building schools in the 90/90/90 model — schools with populations made up of more than 90 percent low-income students, more than 90 percent ethnic minorities and more than 90 percent students who meet set academic standards — as a way to provide high-performing schools to students in their own neighborhoods.
Some argue that the model fails to address issues of segregation, as discriminatory housing practices continue to create segregated communities — a fact that is especially problematic given that housing prices have been linked to school quality.
A recent study by the Brookings Institute reports that homes located in neighborhoods with high-performing schools cost, on average, about 2.4 times as much as those located in neighborhoods with low-performing schools. Since students of color are more likely to live in low-income neighborhoods than their white peers, students of color thereby have less access to high-performing schools.
Though redlining has long been part of the desegregation conversation, reformers are increasingly focusing their attention on charter schools — a model that has radically changed the landscape of the U.S. public school system in the last 30 years.
The popularity of charter schools has continued to escalate in recent years, despite the fact that charter schools have been found to be, on average, more segregated than traditional schools.
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Segregation continues in urban schools (photo)
July 11, 2012

Nearly 60 years have passed since the Supreme Court made its landmark Brown vs. Board of Education decision, legally ending school segregation across the U.S. Today, the legacy of school segregation persists, as racial isolation remains the reality of many students nationwide.

Though it is expected that the U.S. population will shift from a white-majority to a minority-majority by 2046, currently most students do not see that diversity reflected in their school experience. Nationally, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, 52 percent of black students and 58 percent of Latino students attend school where minority students make up 75 percent or more of the entire student body.

In Chicago, America’s most segregated city, it’s typical for students to go through their entire K-12 education without ever having met a classmate of another race, as “GOOD reported this week.  In a recent radio interview on a local station, a Chicago student described having thought that schools were still legally segregated, based solely on her surroundings.

Advocates for reform argue that the incentives to foster greater diversity in schools are clear: Exposing students to racially and culturally diverse environments prepares them for the world outside school doors. Recent studies have also shown that students fare better academically in schools with greater levels of socioeconomic diversity.

Throughout the past decade, public school reformers have focused largely on building schools in the 90/90/90 model — schools with populations made up of more than 90 percent low-income students, more than 90 percent ethnic minorities and more than 90 percent students who meet set academic standards — as a way to provide high-performing schools to students in their own neighborhoods.

Some argue that the model fails to address issues of segregation, as discriminatory housing practices continue to create segregated communities — a fact that is especially problematic given that housing prices have been linked to school quality.

recent study by the Brookings Institute reports that homes located in neighborhoods with high-performing schools cost, on average, about 2.4 times as much as those located in neighborhoods with low-performing schools. Since students of color are more likely to live in low-income neighborhoods than their white peers, students of color thereby have less access to high-performing schools.

Though redlining has long been part of the desegregation conversation, reformers are increasingly focusing their attention on charter schools — a model that has radically changed the landscape of the U.S. public school system in the last 30 years.

The popularity of charter schools has continued to escalate in recent years, despite the fact that charter schools have been found to be, on average, more segregated than traditional schools.

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Protesters demand UCLA increase its minority student population

At least a dozen protesters were arrested at the UCLA admissions office Friday afternoon as they demanded the school double their minority student population and take another look at four Latino and Black students who were rejected from the university, despite what demonstrators called ”stellar” academic records.

About 40 people, including high school and college students, gathered to “occupy” the office around 3:30 p.m., said Ronald Cruz, an attorney with By Any Means Necessary (BAMN) who was at the protest.

Of the school’s more than 27,000 undergraduates, nearly 37 percent are Asian or Pacific Islander, and white, non-Hispanic students make up 31.2 percent of the student body, according to UCLA’s enrollment report for the Fall 2011 quarter.

The report lists the percentage of represented ethnicities on campus:

  • Hispanic students: 16.55
  • International students: 7.40
  • Black, Non-Hispanic students: 4.04
  • Unstated, unknown or other: 3.72
  • American Indian or Alaska Native students: 0.53

The group took issue with those figures, and gathered Friday with three demands. Cruz listed them in an email statement:

  • Double Latina/o, black and other underrepresented minority studentenrollment
  • Admit more Latina/o, black, and other underrepresented minority students including some of the students we are submitting.
  • Reopen the Appeals process to allow the more than deserving Latina/o, black, Native American and other underrepresented minority who have been denied once or twice already the chance to be reconsidered.

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