mylittlerewolution
aljazeeraamerica:

Thousands of drone protesters in Pakistan block NATO supply route

Thousands of people protesting U.S. drone strikes on Saturday blocked a road in northwest Pakistan that is used to move NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan, the latest sign of rising tension brought on by the U.S. strikes. The U.S. drone program is deeply unpopular in Pakistan and condemned by Islamabad as counter-productive and a violation of sovereignty, although previous governments have given their tacit support to the strikes.
The protest, led by Pakistani politician and former cricket star Imran Khan, had more symbolic value than practical impact as there is normally little NATO supply traffic on the road on Saturdays. The blocked route in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province leads to one of two border crossings used to send supplies overland from Pakistan to neighboring Afghanistan.

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Photo: Fayaz Aziz/Reuters

aljazeeraamerica:

Thousands of drone protesters in Pakistan block NATO supply route

Thousands of people protesting U.S. drone strikes on Saturday blocked a road in northwest Pakistan that is used to move NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan, the latest sign of rising tension brought on by the U.S. strikes. The U.S. drone program is deeply unpopular in Pakistan and condemned by Islamabad as counter-productive and a violation of sovereignty, although previous governments have given their tacit support to the strikes.

The protest, led by Pakistani politician and former cricket star Imran Khan, had more symbolic value than practical impact as there is normally little NATO supply traffic on the road on Saturdays. The blocked route in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province leads to one of two border crossings used to send supplies overland from Pakistan to neighboring Afghanistan.

Read more

Photo: Fayaz Aziz/Reuters

robert-cunningham

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication

We wholeheartedly endorse Democracy Now!’s choice of their Memorial Day special. So along with this video, we would like to acknowledge and congratulate this Memorial Day, all those veterans who threw off their medals as an act against the United States’ imperialist wars during the NATO protests.

Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.

— — — — —

From our 2012 Memorial Day posts.

Reporter asks White House if US airstrikes that kill Afghan civilians qualify as ‘terrorism’

Amina Ismail, a journalist at McClatchy: I send my deepest condolence to the victims and families in Boston. But President Obama said that what happened in Boston was an act of terrorism. I would like to ask, Do you consider the U.S. bombing on civilians in Afghanistan earlier this month that left 11 children and a woman killed a form of terrorism? Why or why not?

Jay Carney, White House press secretary: Well, I would have to know more about the incident and then obviously the Department of Defense would have answers to your questions on this matter. We have more than 60,000 U.S. troops involved in a war in Afghanistan, a war that began when the United States was attacked, in an attack that was organized on the soil of Afghanistan by al Qaeda, by Osama bin laden and others and more than 3,000 people were killed in that attack. And it has been the President’s objective once he took office to make clear what our goals are in Afghanistan and that is to disrupt, dismantle and ultimately defeat al Qaeda. And with that as our objective to provide enough assistance to Afghan National Security Forces and the Afghan government to allow them to take over security for themselves. And that process is underway and the United States has withdrawn a substantial number of troops and we are in the process of drowning down further as we hand over security lead to Afghan forces. And it is certainly the case that I refer you to the defense department for details that we take great care in the prosecution of this war and we are very mindful of what our objectives are.

…in an attempt to completely dodge the original question. Just throw in the words “al Qaeda” & “terrorism” here & there, & you’ve got a White House response. 

Source

“This was a heinous and cowardly act, and given what we now know about what took place, the FBI is investigating it as an act of terrorism. Anytime bombs are used to target innocent civilians, it is an act of terror.” - President Obama

NATO strike kills women & girls gathering firewoodSeptember 16, 2012
A NATO airstrike killed eight women and girls in eastern Afghanistan, local officials reported. The alliance said the strike targeted 45 armed insurgents but admitted some civilians may have been killed.
The women were gathering firewood when they were killed by the strike, spokesperson for the Laghman provincial government Sarhadi Zewak said. Several women were also injured during the NATO strike, he added.
Villagers brought the victims’ bodies to the local governor’s office on Sunday in the wake of the attack, amid cries of“Death to America!” said Zewak.
Seven females are now in nearby hospitals receiving treatment, some of whom are as young as ten years old, AP reports.
Initial reports claimed that as many as 45 armed insurgents were killed in a "precision air strike,” NATO spokesperson Jamie Graybeal said. However, Major Adam Wojack, a spokesman for the Isaf later told the BBC that between five and eight civilians may have been caught in the crossfire in a “tragic loss of life.”
The issue of frequent civilian deaths in NATO military operations is another point of contention between Afghanistan’s President Hamid Karzai and the US. 
Last year, some 400 Afghan civilians were killed in operations conducted by international and Afghan troops, the UN reported. This year’s estimates suggested that the number of Afghan civilians killed and injured in the first half of 2012 fell 15 percent.
Source
NATO is a war machine.

NATO strike kills women & girls gathering firewood
September 16, 2012

A NATO airstrike killed eight women and girls in eastern Afghanistan, local officials reported. The alliance said the strike targeted 45 armed insurgents but admitted some civilians may have been killed.

The women were gathering firewood when they were killed by the strike, spokesperson for the Laghman provincial government Sarhadi Zewak said. Several women were also injured during the NATO strike, he added.

Villagers brought the victims’ bodies to the local governor’s office on Sunday in the wake of the attack, amid cries of“Death to America!” said Zewak.

Seven females are now in nearby hospitals receiving treatment, some of whom are as young as ten years old, AP reports.

Initial reports claimed that as many as 45 armed insurgents were killed in a "precision air strike,” NATO spokesperson Jamie Graybeal said. However, Major Adam Wojack, a spokesman for the Isaf later told the BBC that between five and eight civilians may have been caught in the crossfire in a “tragic loss of life.”

The issue of frequent civilian deaths in NATO military operations is another point of contention between Afghanistan’s President Hamid Karzai and the US. 

Last year, some 400 Afghan civilians were killed in operations conducted by international and Afghan troops, the UN reported. This year’s estimates suggested that the number of Afghan civilians killed and injured in the first half of 2012 fell 15 percent.

Source

NATO is a war machine.

Kabul: US violated security pact in calling deadly air strike

June 10, 2012

The Afghan president’s office said the security accord with the US is at risk after Wednesday’s airstrike that killed 18 villagers. The pact is a key part of the withdrawal plan for the NATO-led coalition from the country.

The raid, in the eastern province of Logar, saw a supposedly joint Afghan-coalition force surround a village where a Taliban leader was holed up. In the ensuing firefight, the Americans called an air strike, which killed 18 people, including 5 women and 7 children, who’d gathered for a wedding celebration.

Following an Afghan investigation into the event, President Karzai’s office blamed US commanders on Saturday for taking a unilateral decision to bomb the village. "The Americans didn’t wait for the Afghans to try and flush out the militants and unilaterally called for a strike," presidential spokesman Aimal Faizi said.

Kabul believes the act violated the terms of a strategic security pact between Afghanistan and the US, which was signed in the spring. The agreement sets a roadmap for handing over responsibility for security in the country to the Afghan side. Particularly, it sets the Afghan government in charge of special operations like the one in Logar.

The Logar incident was the fifth time civilian casualties were caused by unilateral US actions since the pact was signed, Faizi said. He added President Karzai and his advisers decided that, if another unapproved airstrike occurs, the Afghan government will have to consider that the US troops part of an “occupation”.

Source

International Uprising Pushes Onward - May Global Round-up
June 2, 2012 

The global working class is continuing to feed off of one another’s momentum to strengthen the wave of international protest. Momentous protests have propelled international social movements to continue the plight for human rights, educational opportunities and for an end to all wars.

The historical significance of the surge of political protests throughout the world is immense. In times of upheaval, we have seen great social and political changes in the aftermath. This progress is not because of any given political party in office at that time, but because of the people in the streets demanding a better life. From toppling oppressive regimes to reclaiming basic human rights, massive demonstrations generate a Domino effect that triggers other uprisings to carry on the flood of global resistance.

The international working class is no longer putting up with corrupt capitalist agendas, environmental degradation, crashing economies or skyrocketing poverty. But as the mainstream media remains nearly silent on these waves of protest, these activist communities must not be ignored, and their causes must be recognized as one world struggle.

The May Day protests on May 1 breathed a revolutionary life into the spring offensive across the world. These are the events that marked the international surge of resistance in the month of May:

May 1

  • More than 1,500 Palestinian prisoners participated in a mass hunger strike in the occupied territories of the West Bank and Gaza to oppose the wrongful imprisonment of thousands of Palestinians, horrific prison conditions and inhumane treatment during their incarceration without formal charges. Ten hunger-strikers were hospitalized by the end of the strike. Israeli officials compromised a deal to allow solitary confinement prisoners to be returned to the other areas of the prison as well as to allow family visits.
  • Cities all over the world, from Paris, Oslo, Madrid, New York City, Montreal and Palestine, celebrated May Day in solidarity with all working class groups everywhere.

May 2

  • South Koreans held a candlelit rally to demand the government stop food imports from the United States because of high rates of food poisoning and mad cow disease.

May 3

  • Syrian security forces kill four in a student protest at Aleppo University when administrators announced it would suspend classes. Protesters also marched opposing President Bashar al-Assad.

May 4

  • Thousands occupied Tahrir Square in Egypt to oppose the country’s brutal military rule as police violence left at least nine dead in the streets of Cairo.

May 5

  • 106 activists were arrested outside of Quebec’s liberal party headquarters demanding an end to tuition hikes. Three were hospitalized, and one protester lost the use of an eye as police shot rubber bullets and fired tear gas at protesters.

May 6

  • A dozen California State University students announced they would go on a hunger strike to call for a five-year moratorium on tuition fee increases and a cut on executive pay.

May 8

  • About 20 protesters were arrested in Nepal after the government forcefully evicted residents in Katmandu. Dozens were injured as riot police demolished homes and forced families to relocate.

May 9

  • Hundreds marched outside of the Bank of America shareholders meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina to protest foreclosures across the country. Four people were arrested.

May 10

May 11

  • Yemeni protesters sat in the streets in protest calling for a trial of former president Ali Abdullah Seleh and for the removal of his relatives from military positions.

May 12

  • Los Indignados of Spain celebrated their one-year anniversary with tens of thousands filling the streets to stand up against poverty and unemployment rates throughout the country in the anti-austerity movement.
  • Hundreds mobilized in Addison, Texas to fight against the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which some say is a revised version of the NATO treaty.

May 13

  • dozen Russian writers led a protest of more than 10,000 people to oppose the Putin regime. The march stopped traffic for miles, and no arrests were made.

May 14

  • Eight anti-NATO protesters were arrested outside of the Barack Obama headquarters after rallying for an end to all wars across the world.

May 15

  • Thousands of Palestinians commemorated Nakba Day, which marks the day in 1948 when the state of Israel was established and began the displacement, murder and imprisonment of thousands of Palestinian families.

May 16

  • Hundreds of protesters took the streets of Chile as a part of the Chilean Student Movement to demand free education.
  • More than 30 activists were arrested after police evicted Occupy Moscow. About 10,000 people joined in the march as a part of the anti-austerity movement throughout Europe.

May 17

  • Houston activists gathered at the county court house to demand justice for black 15-year-old teenager Chad Holley, who was beaten to death by a white former police officer who was acquitted of all charges.
  • Countless protests erupted as NATO negotiations took place in Chicago. Thousands of activists descended upon the city to protest against global wars.

May 18

  • The Nurses rally invades Chicago over the NATO Summit weekend to march for a Robin Hood tax that would impose higher taxes on the rich.

May 19

  • Frankfurt hosted massive demonstrations continuing to fuel the opposition to harsh austerity measures throughout Germany. More than 30,000 protesters demonstrated at the largest rally.

May 20

  • Protests at the NATO Summit in Chicago turn violent when police officers club demonstrators and journalists  bloody and arrest 60.

May 21

May 22

  • Canada saw its largest act of civil disobedience when nearly 250,000 marched in defiance of Bill 78, which limits protesters’ rights to demonstrate.

May 24

  • A Mexican student movement, “Yo Soy 132,” begins with thousands marching in Mexico City fighting for fair media coverage of upcoming presidential elections, an end to political corruption and more access to education.
  • Protesters gather outside of the Amazon Shareholders meeting to demand the company drop its membership to the American Legislative Exchange Council. Amazon later on announced it would drop its ALEC membership.

May 26

  • Striking workers shut down the Golden Gate ferry to demand fair compensation as workers, especially during holiday weekends.
  • Thousands of activists rally across the world after the Houla massacre in Syria on May 25.

May 27

  • About 1,000 people protested in North Carolina against Pastor Charles Worley, who told his congregation the Bible opposed homosexuality and that the LGBTQ community should be kept within an electric fence.

May 28

  • Anti-government protests have sparked in Georgia with up to 100,000 demonstrators demanding an end to corruption and military rule.
  • 50,000 people descended upon Casablanca to protest a growing unemployment rate and human rights violations by the Moroccan government.
  • Two Tibetan monks self-immolated in protest against Chinese occupation of Tibet.
  • A protester burst into a courtroom where ex-Prime Minister Tony Blair was speaking and yelled that Blair was a “war criminal” for his role in the Iraq War.
  • 500 lawyers and legal professionals march through Montreal to protest Bill 78, which requires all protests be approved by authorities beforehand.

May 29

  • Egyptian protesters set the home of presidential candidate and ex-Gadafi official Amhad Shafik ablaze to protest the first round of the country’s presidential election. Thousands gathered in Tahrir Square later that night.

May 30

  • Spanish miners blocked a highway in opposition to budget cuts for the mining sector, threatening jobs, healthcare and pensions for workers.
  • International marches of support for Wikileaks founder and journalist Julian Assange sprung up the day the whistleblower’s extradition to Sweden was ordered.
  • Nepalese protesters take the streets of Kathmandu demanding Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai’s resignation.

May 31

  • Fourteen Occupiers were arrested while trying to protect a family’s home from foreclosure in Minneapolis.
  • Six Occupy Albany protesters were arrested during a rally to demand a minimum wage increase outside of the office of Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos.
  • About 40 students and administrators occupied the Office of Admissions at the University of California at Los Angeles to protest the university’s admissions procedures, which they say discriminate against minorities.


- G. Razo

For more Global Round-Ups from thepeoplesrecord.com, click here.

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication 
Sergeant Shamar Thomas (photo source)
Sergeant Shamar Thomas is a veteran marine sergeant who stood up to a hoard of NYPD officers in militarized gear that were preparing to assault protesters at Occupy Wall Street. His heroic stand caused the officers to back-down and retreat and immediately became one of the most memorable moments of the Occupy Wall Street protest. This Memorial Day, we salute him! Here’s the video of his face-off with NYPD.
Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication

Sergeant Shamar Thomas (photo source)

Sergeant Shamar Thomas is a veteran marine sergeant who stood up to a hoard of NYPD officers in militarized gear that were preparing to assault protesters at Occupy Wall Street. His heroic stand caused the officers to back-down and retreat and immediately became one of the most memorable moments of the Occupy Wall Street protest. This Memorial Day, we salute him! Here’s the video of his face-off with NYPD.

Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication 
Veteran Scott Olsen: “We’re going forward.” 
Former Marine and Iraq War Veteran Scott Olsen has dealt with innumerable aftershocks once he came home from overseas. His became an outspoken opponent of the war when he joined Veterans for Peace and became a part of Occupy Oakland in 2011. 
Still dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder, Olsen was hit by a beanbag projectile during a confrontation with the Oakland Police at an Occupy Oakland action in October 2011. He suffered from a serious skull fracture and could not speak for two weeks.
Last weekend at the NATO Summit demonstrations, Olsen and dozens of other veterans threw their medals of honor in opposition to all wars. He wore a helmet as he marched with other protesters in the streets of Chicago and still struggles with his speech daily.
"I’m going to make every effort I can to show them that we’re doing the right thing, we’re in the right, and no matter what they do to any of us, we’ve got each other’s backs, and we’re going forward." 
Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication 

Veteran Scott Olsen: “We’re going forward.” 

Former Marine and Iraq War Veteran Scott Olsen has dealt with innumerable aftershocks once he came home from overseas. His became an outspoken opponent of the war when he joined Veterans for Peace and became a part of Occupy Oakland in 2011. 

Still dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder, Olsen was hit by a beanbag projectile during a confrontation with the Oakland Police at an Occupy Oakland action in October 2011. He suffered from a serious skull fracture and could not speak for two weeks.

Last weekend at the NATO Summit demonstrations, Olsen and dozens of other veterans threw their medals of honor in opposition to all wars. He wore a helmet as he marched with other protesters in the streets of Chicago and still struggles with his speech daily.

"I’m going to make every effort I can to show them that we’re doing the right thing, we’re in the right, and no matter what they do to any of us, we’ve got each other’s backs, and we’re going forward." 

Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.

The People’s Record Memorial Day Dedication

We wholeheartedly endorse Democracy Now!'s choice of their Memorial Day special. So along with this video, we would like to acknowledge and congratulate this Memorial Day, all those veterans who threw off their medals as an act against the United States' imperialist wars during the NATO protests.

Click here for a complete list of The People’s Record’s Memorial Day dedications.


Victory at NATO Summit demonstrations

Chicago protesters held impressive ground this past weekend at the NATO Summit demonstrations. Despite militaristic intimidation tactics used by the Chicago Police Department, demonstrators’ voices were heard loud and strong: fuck the NATO war machine.

Arrests totaled up to 60, including the “NATO 3” - Brian Church, Jared Chase and Brent Betterly – who are facing terrorist charges and being held on a $1.5 million bond. They are currently in solitary confinement in Chicago and could face up to 85 years in prison.

While arrest numbers stayed relatively low, especially compared to the 700 arrested over the past few days in Quebec student protests, brutality incidents were much larger. Ruthless CPD officers swung their bikes and batons at protesters and beat several journalists bloody. Reports of protesters being admitted to the hospital for stitches and possible concussions painted the picture of the war zone against free speech in the streets of Chicago.

But the protesters’ voices rang louder than the blood running down their foreheads. Veterans hurling their medals of honor in disgust and in apology for their participation in corrupt wars spoke volumes higher than the imperialistic ongoings inside of the Summit.

The weekend events in Chicago sent a vibrant message of unity to the world, proving to the ruling class that the people are awake and ready for a radical change. Activists must be aware of the experiences of the NATO Summit demonstrations, and use them to rally forward.

Building a necessary solidarity

From the nurses unions and the Free Bradley Manning Contingent to Occupy groups and veteran organizations, activists swarmed Chicago to condemn the NATO warmongers and their deathly exploitation of people across the world. These resistance groups linked together to become a force more potent than the police. Not only does this massive display of solidarity boast numbers in the tens of thousands, it also churns out ideas that will change the status quo.

This unrest is only making the capitalist ruling class more and more nervous. We can see the counterattacks taking on different forms: a militarized police force, laws condemning whistleblowers, online surveillance and a backlash against unions. But this is only the beginning. Resistance groups must bind together to build a strong solidarity and cooperation with one another to continue to shake the grip the corrupt American government.

Our enemy is one in the same and must be recognized as so. The United States is no longer run by the people, but by profit-gorging capitalists. But in a united fight, the system can be toppled by the might of these working class groups.

Ditching ineffective media

As mainstream media coverage has proven these past few days, it no longer belongs to the people and only acts in the interests of its capitalist ownership. Headlines splashed across front pages read that protesters “clashed” with police, instead of showing the true police violence. News articles focused on the police officer who was stabbed, while giving only brief mentions to protesters who were beaten until their blood splattered on the asphalt. Comparisons were made between police in riot gear standing off against protesters who wore black and ski masks, when there was no comparison to be made.

The mainstream corporate-owned media has continued to uphold the capitalist agenda by perpetually stripping validity away from demonstrators. Protest stories are tarnished with an underlining sense of violence – not by the police forces who spent millions on weapons and armed officers, but by protesters merely exercising their right to march.

However, a strong media system is not dead, but evolving. Democracy Now, Truth-out, Socialist Worker, AlterNet and livestream channels are just a few alternative media sources that gave true coverage of the NATO protests this weekend. These democratic outlets continue to expose the government threat to First Amendment liberties and to give spotlight to the working class uprisings transforming their world.

The NATO Summit demonstrations injected energy into the American and global spring. Even though government repression continues to strengthen, this vitality cannot fizzle. NATO represents a foundation of capitalist oppression, suffocating the life out of the international working class. But a much larger system has strangled the world for long enough, and it is the time to fight back.

- G. Razo

The mainstream media bias on the NATO protests was shameful. So many outlets talked about the police officer who was injured & not the countless protesters who were beaten with batons & even bicycles or the journalists who were clubbed & brutalized. 
CPD & riot forces were out there intimidating demonstrators until their first change to strike with machine guns, batons, LRADs & zip ties. Protesters were on the streets fighting for human rights & dignity. 
Police forces & the mainstream media are tools of the 1 percent. 
More on commentary on NATO coming up soon.

The mainstream media bias on the NATO protests was shameful. So many outlets talked about the police officer who was injured & not the countless protesters who were beaten with batons & even bicycles or the journalists who were clubbed & brutalized. 

CPD & riot forces were out there intimidating demonstrators until their first change to strike with machine guns, batons, LRADs & zip ties. Protesters were on the streets fighting for human rights & dignity. 

Police forces & the mainstream media are tools of the 1 percent.

More on commentary on NATO coming up soon.