yourfriendlycomrade

nextyearsgirl:

ohhitumblr:

nyulocal:

zoeschlanger:

Oy vey this guy.

Can’t take back the hashtag, bro. #truth

Wooooooow what a scumbag

Not shocked he’s an evolutionary psychologist.

Evolutionary psychology is make-believe non-science that serves to support the status quo for all things problematic like: sexism, racism, gender roles, fat-hate & more!

It takes features of our current oppressive culture and comes up with somewhat-plausible (although completely improbable) explanations for why those social features are a result of evolution. It explains such phenomena as why men cheat & impulsively rape, why women are submissive,etc. These comments are a PERFECT example of the type of thinking that comes out of this bizarre field.

This man should be forcibly removed from teaching at any University (although he may be eligible for a segment on the O’Reilly factor). 

Please get on twitter & tweet him AND NYU (& contact them in various other ways as well) suggesting as much. If you see or know this man in person, please tell him how you feel. He needs to know. 

coolthoughts asked:

man can you stop quoting the new york post? it's essentially a tabloid.

Posting to share the general opinion about the NY Post - although, if we believe a story to be accurate (based on multiple sources or personal knowledge of the circumstances), we’ll post whichever source is best written/formatted for our purposes. 

We often post stories that are from news sources that we don’t generally support - like the New York Times & the Washington Post, Bloomberg, Forbes, and various others. We post the stories we believe to be true with the sources we believe to be most accurate & concise. We often change wording to remove oppressive, misleading or otherwise problematic language.

Thanks for the feedback.

tywyllwch-tachwedd
tywyllwch-tachwedd:

dreadful-record-of-sin:

thepeoplesrecord:

Fast food strike wave spreads to Detroit, St. LouisMay 10, 2013
St. Louis, and last month’s in New York and Chicago, today’s work stoppage is backed by a local coalition including the Service Employees International Union, and the participants are demanding a raise to $15 an hour and the chance to form a union without intimidation.
Organizers say that over a hundred workers joined the St. Louis strike between Wednesday and Thursday. That included a group of Jimmy John’s workers who alleged that management humiliated them by requiring them to hold up signs in public with messages including “I made 3 wrong sandwiches today” and “I was more than 13 seconds in the drive thru.”
“Sometimes I walk for more than an hour just to save my train fare so I can spend it on Ramen noodles,” St. Louis Chipotle worker Patrick Leeper said in an e-mailed statement Thursday. “I can’t even think about groceries.”
A spokesperson for Jimmy John’s declined to comment on Thursday’s strike; McDonald’s and Wendy’s did not respond to inquiries last night.
As I’ve written elsewhere, the fate of the fast food strike wave carries far-reaching implications: Fast food jobs are a growing portion of our economy, and fast food-like conditions are proliferating in other sectors as well. Organizers say the fast food industry now employs twice as many Detroit-area workers as the city’s iconic auto industry. These strikes also come at a moment of existential crisis for the labor movement, a sobering reality that was brought into sharp relief in December when Michigan, arguably the birthplace of modern US private sector unionism, became the country’s latest “Right to Work” state.
Along with a shared significant supporter—SEIU—the campaigns in New York, Chicago, St. Louis and Detroit have apparent strategies in common. Rather than waiting until they’ve built support from a majority of a store’s or company’s workers, they stage actions by a minority of the workforce designed to inspire their co-workers. Rather than publicly identifying the campaign and its organizers with a single international union, these union-funded efforts turn to allied community groups to spearhead organizing. Rather than training all their resources on a single company, they organize against all of the industry’s players at once. And—faced with legal and economic assaults that have weakened the strike weapon—these campaigns mount one-day work stoppages that are carefully tailored to maximize attention and minimize, but not eliminate, the risk that workers will lose their jobs.
Whether these strategies can ever compel a fast food giant to negotiate with its employees remains to be seen.
“After what I would consider well over three decades of wage suppression, workers in this particular industry—and then I think it’ll go to others—are realizing that their only way up the wage ladder is through their own organizations,” CUNY labor studies lecturer Ed Ott said Wednesday. Ott, a board member of the community organizing group that spearheaded the New York fast food strike, added, “The only way these workers are going to be able to advance these jobs is through unionization. And I think that idea has finally gotten traction.”
Update (9:15 AM Friday): According to the campaign, a walkout by twenty workers at Detroit’s 10400 Gratiot Avenue McDonald’s prevented the store from operating. Some workers brought in as strikebreakers to replace those striking workers chose to join the strike instead.
Organizers say that by day’s end, today’s strike could be the largest fast food work stoppage yet, topping last month’s 400-strong strike in New York.
Source

Fuck yeah.

I have to say, considering Jimmy John’s is featured here, I’m disappointed the IWW hasn’t been remotely mentioned, but of course I’m also not surprised. (I’m furthermore hoping this doesn’t get picked up by the SEIU or any trade unions because not even SEIU has a concept of total militancy…) But still, this is a fantastic development. Solidarity with all the strikers!

Fill our inbox and/or email with information about the IWW. I’ve heard bits and pieces about the organization (things I’ve heard that may or may not be true: was syndaclist, now isn’t; was problematic, now isn’t). Anyway, ya’ll’ve got a strong enough internet presence to peak my curiosity. 

tywyllwch-tachwedd:

dreadful-record-of-sin:

thepeoplesrecord:

Fast food strike wave spreads to Detroit, St. Louis
May 10, 2013

St. Louis, and last month’s in New York and Chicago, today’s work stoppage is backed by a local coalition including the Service Employees International Union, and the participants are demanding a raise to $15 an hour and the chance to form a union without intimidation.

Organizers say that over a hundred workers joined the St. Louis strike between Wednesday and Thursday. That included a group of Jimmy John’s workers who alleged that management humiliated them by requiring them to hold up signs in public with messages including “I made 3 wrong sandwiches today” and “I was more than 13 seconds in the drive thru.”

“Sometimes I walk for more than an hour just to save my train fare so I can spend it on Ramen noodles,” St. Louis Chipotle worker Patrick Leeper said in an e-mailed statement Thursday. “I can’t even think about groceries.”

A spokesperson for Jimmy John’s declined to comment on Thursday’s strike; McDonald’s and Wendy’s did not respond to inquiries last night.

As I’ve written elsewhere, the fate of the fast food strike wave carries far-reaching implications: Fast food jobs are a growing portion of our economy, and fast food-like conditions are proliferating in other sectors as well. Organizers say the fast food industry now employs twice as many Detroit-area workers as the city’s iconic auto industry. These strikes also come at a moment of existential crisis for the labor movement, a sobering reality that was brought into sharp relief in December when Michigan, arguably the birthplace of modern US private sector unionism, became the country’s latest “Right to Work” state.

Along with a shared significant supporter—SEIU—the campaigns in New York, Chicago, St. Louis and Detroit have apparent strategies in common. Rather than waiting until they’ve built support from a majority of a store’s or company’s workers, they stage actions by a minority of the workforce designed to inspire their co-workers. Rather than publicly identifying the campaign and its organizers with a single international union, these union-funded efforts turn to allied community groups to spearhead organizing. Rather than training all their resources on a single company, they organize against all of the industry’s players at once. And—faced with legal and economic assaults that have weakened the strike weapon—these campaigns mount one-day work stoppages that are carefully tailored to maximize attention and minimize, but not eliminate, the risk that workers will lose their jobs.

Whether these strategies can ever compel a fast food giant to negotiate with its employees remains to be seen.

“After what I would consider well over three decades of wage suppression, workers in this particular industry—and then I think it’ll go to others—are realizing that their only way up the wage ladder is through their own organizations,” CUNY labor studies lecturer Ed Ott said Wednesday. Ott, a board member of the community organizing group that spearheaded the New York fast food strike, added, “The only way these workers are going to be able to advance these jobs is through unionization. And I think that idea has finally gotten traction.”

Update (9:15 AM Friday): According to the campaign, a walkout by twenty workers at Detroit’s 10400 Gratiot Avenue McDonald’s prevented the store from operating. Some workers brought in as strikebreakers to replace those striking workers chose to join the strike instead.

Organizers say that by day’s end, today’s strike could be the largest fast food work stoppage yet, topping last month’s 400-strong strike in New York.

Source

Fuck yeah.

I have to say, considering Jimmy John’s is featured here, I’m disappointed the IWW hasn’t been remotely mentioned, but of course I’m also not surprised. (I’m furthermore hoping this doesn’t get picked up by the SEIU or any trade unions because not even SEIU has a concept of total militancy…) But still, this is a fantastic development. Solidarity with all the strikers!

Fill our inbox and/or email with information about the IWW. I’ve heard bits and pieces about the organization (things I’ve heard that may or may not be true: was syndaclist, now isn’t; was problematic, now isn’t). Anyway, ya’ll’ve got a strong enough internet presence to peak my curiosity. 

Dear educators and allies,
Thank you for being incredible advocates for undocumented youth. As you may know, the NYS Youth Leadership Council is an undocumented youth-led organization built to fight for the rights of undocumented youth. For the past three years, we have been working on advocating for the New York Dream, a bill that would allow undocumented youth to access financial aid for their college education.  One of the key people who can make the New York DREAM Act a reality is Governor Cuomo, who can include the bill in his executive budget which is being finalized next week. Right now, it seems that he is not convinced that including the NY DREAM Act in his budget is the right thing to do, so we need to be united and strong in our demand that he do the right thing and allow young, promising people in NY State to access financial aid.
We believe that the best way to get his attention is by holding a human chain around his midtown New York City office (633 Third Avenue) this Tuesday, March 19, 2013 from 1:00-1:30pm. A human chain is a safe and effective way to show Governor Cuomo that we are united as advocates who believe that all people, regardless of their immigration status, have the right to go to college and realize their full potential. We know that this is very short notice, however there is still time to act to convince Governor Cuomo that this is the right thing to do. Passing the NY DREAM Act would change the lives of thousands of young, promising people in NY who dream of going to college. Please forward this on to your networks.

Let’s work together to pass the NY Dream Act!!!

Sincerely,
Dominique HernandezField OrganizerP | 646-484-8537
—From Dominique Hernandez <dominique@nysylc.org> at YLC - please pass along to your networks and be in touch with her if you can hard confirm.

Dear educators and allies,

Thank you for being incredible advocates for undocumented youth. As you may know, the NYS Youth Leadership Council is an undocumented youth-led organization built to fight for the rights of undocumented youth. For the past three years, we have been working on advocating for the New York Dream, a bill that would allow undocumented youth to access financial aid for their college education.  One of the key people who can make the New York DREAM Act a reality is Governor Cuomo, who can include the bill in his executive budget which is being finalized next week. Right now, it seems that he is not convinced that including the NY DREAM Act in his budget is the right thing to do, so we need to be united and strong in our demand that he do the right thing and allow young, promising people in NY State to access financial aid.

We believe that the best way to get his attention is by holding a human chain around his midtown New York City office (633 Third Avenue) this Tuesday, March 19, 2013 from 1:00-1:30pm. A human chain is a safe and effective way to show Governor Cuomo that we are united as advocates who believe that all people, regardless of their immigration status, have the right to go to college and realize their full potential. We know that this is very short notice, however there is still time to act to convince Governor Cuomo that this is the right thing to do. Passing the NY DREAM Act would change the lives of thousands of young, promising people in NY who dream of going to college. Please forward this on to your networks.

Let’s work together to pass the NY Dream Act!!!

Sincerely,

Dominique Hernandez
Field Organizer
P | 646-484-8537


From Dominique Hernandez <dominique@nysylc.org> at YLC - please pass along to your networks and be in touch with her if you can hard confirm.

New York man dies in police custody, family suspects he was killedMarch 1, 2013
The family of a Western New York man who died after being stun with a Taser gun while in police custody plans to sue over the ideal.
The estate of Richard Metcalf tells WIVB News that they have filed a notice of claim against Erie County and the Depew, New York Police Department. Metcalf, 35, died in November after suffering a massive heart attack while in the custody of the Erie County Sheriff&#8217;s jail division.
"I want to get to the bottom of it. I want to know the truth. I want to know what happened. I think his mother and I deserve to know what happened,” the victim’s father, Richard Metcalf, Sr., tells WIVB.
The younger Metcalf was in police custody at the time of his death because he had been arrested days earlier by a Depew police officer called to respond to a burglary in progress. He was shot with a Taser during the ordeal and taken to the Erie County Medical Center shortly after due to an elevated heart rate, but was then transported to a holding center. Once back in a cell, police say he started acting erratically.
"He was spitting blood at the officers as they were trying to de-escalate the situation,” Holding Center Superintendent Thomas Diina told WIVB. “It was reported that he was poking himself with a fork, raking his face across the bars in front of his cell in order to get his mouth bloody so that he could spit at the officers.”
Metcalf’s family disputes that claim, though, and suspects foul play.
"My personal opinion is that he was severely beaten. There&#8217;s no other explanation. There&#8217;s no other logical explanation for that. If you can imagine your child like that after you just saw him,” his father told the network last year while holding back tears.
After officers in the holding cell composed Metcalf, he was taken once again to the medical center where he died shortly after.
Source

New York man dies in police custody, family suspects he was killed
March 1, 2013

The family of a Western New York man who died after being stun with a Taser gun while in police custody plans to sue over the ideal.

The estate of Richard Metcalf tells WIVB News that they have filed a notice of claim against Erie County and the Depew, New York Police Department. Metcalf, 35, died in November after suffering a massive heart attack while in the custody of the Erie County Sheriff’s jail division.

"I want to get to the bottom of it. I want to know the truth. I want to know what happened. I think his mother and I deserve to know what happened,” the victim’s father, Richard Metcalf, Sr., tells WIVB.

The younger Metcalf was in police custody at the time of his death because he had been arrested days earlier by a Depew police officer called to respond to a burglary in progress. He was shot with a Taser during the ordeal and taken to the Erie County Medical Center shortly after due to an elevated heart rate, but was then transported to a holding center. Once back in a cell, police say he started acting erratically.

"He was spitting blood at the officers as they were trying to de-escalate the situation,” Holding Center Superintendent Thomas Diina told WIVB. “It was reported that he was poking himself with a fork, raking his face across the bars in front of his cell in order to get his mouth bloody so that he could spit at the officers.”

Metcalf’s family disputes that claim, though, and suspects foul play.

"My personal opinion is that he was severely beaten. There’s no other explanation. There’s no other logical explanation for that. If you can imagine your child like that after you just saw him,” his father told the network last year while holding back tears.

After officers in the holding cell composed Metcalf, he was taken once again to the medical center where he died shortly after.

Source

Hey NYC Tumblr family, our incredibly talented friend Alejandro is putting on his show, THE BROWN QUEEN, on March 12 at the LGBT Center in Brooklyn. He was generous enough to let us stay at his place while we were working on our project in New York. He&#8217;s a passionate performer, a compassionate human being, and super queer queen with an incredibly bright mind &amp; personality. Help us return the support and share this show on your dash &amp; with all of your NYC contacts. Come out and see it if you can. It&#8217;s going to be really entertaining. 

The story of a gay Chican@ boy born in El Paso, Texas, who eventually claimed New York City as his queendom. The Brown Queen begins with Diana Ross on the radio, while cruising downtown El Paso in a 1963 Rebel Rambler. The story travels from an early Chican@ upbringing in the borderlands of Tejas, to Sioux City, Iowa, and finally New York City. Through his tale, discover how the Brown Queen arrives at a fabulously queer life in New York City. A performance of growth, endeavor, and celebration. Friends and Foes:It would be an honor to have y&#8217;all come and watch me take it to the floor at my place of employment. CATEGORY IS: CENTER REALNESSIn the past three years I have had the opportunity to bring small excerpts of my show at different events and now I&#8217;m gonna do it all. Not just the tip. So please come support me&#8212;it&#8217;s gonna be a shit show, but really funny. THE BROWN QUEENTUESDAY, MARCH 12, 20138pm$5The LGBT Community Center208 West 13th StreetNew York, NY 10011photo by: Camilo Godoypostcard: Untitled Queen Much love, AlejandroakaMz. BootzakaThe Brown QueenakaQuesa

Here&#8217;s a link to the event.

Hey NYC Tumblr family, our incredibly talented friend Alejandro is putting on his show, THE BROWN QUEEN, on March 12 at the LGBT Center in Brooklyn. He was generous enough to let us stay at his place while we were working on our project in New York. He’s a passionate performer, a compassionate human being, and super queer queen with an incredibly bright mind & personality. Help us return the support and share this show on your dash & with all of your NYC contacts. Come out and see it if you can. It’s going to be really entertaining. 

The story of a gay Chican@ boy born in El Paso, Texas, who eventually claimed New York City as his queendom. 

The Brown Queen begins with Diana Ross on the radio, while cruising downtown El Paso in a 1963 Rebel Rambler. The story travels from an early Chican@ upbringing in the borderlands of Tejas, to Sioux City, Iowa, and finally New York City. Through his tale, discover how the Brown Queen arrives at a fabulously queer life in New York City. 

A performance of growth, endeavor, and celebration. 


Friends and Foes:

It would be an honor to have y’all come and watch me take it to the floor at my place of employment. 
CATEGORY IS: CENTER REALNESS

In the past three years I have had the opportunity to bring small excerpts of my show at different events and now I’m gonna do it all. Not just the tip. 

So please come support me—it’s gonna be a shit show, but really funny. 

THE BROWN QUEEN
TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2013
8pm
$5
The LGBT Community Center
208 West 13th Street
New York, NY 10011

photo by: Camilo Godoy
postcard: Untitled Queen 


Much love, 

Alejandro
aka
Mz. Bootz
aka
The Brown Queen
aka
Quesa

Here’s a link to the event.

The People’s Record Daily News Update 
Here’s a collection of news stories for February 13, 2013 that you may not otherwise have a chance to see/learn about.

In Uganda, a British theatre producer has been deported over staging a play about homosexuality

A British theatre producer who angered Ugandan authorities by staging a play about homosexuality has been deported back to the UK, leaving behind his partner and two children.

David Cecil’s deportation came as a shock to his family and legal team, who had been hoping to appeal against proceedings to expel him from Uganda, where homosexuality is illegal (thanks to the efforts of Republican lawmakers & the Christian-right who intentionally cultivated and exasperated homophobia in the region).

A New York town has banned fracking discussions, silencing critics & protecting the natural gas industry

The small New York town of Sanford has enraged environmental groups by prohibiting all discussion of natural gas drilling at town board meetings and is now facing a lawsuit for violating free speech rights.Those opposed to hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” have been unable to discuss their environmental concerns since the ban was implemented in September. To justify barring the environmental talk, the town board alleges that there had already been hours of discussion against gas drilling and that no more was needed.

Military forces from Italy & Qatar in Libyan port to prevent protests during revolution anniversary

Libya is stepping up security nationwide, and is set to close its borders with Egypt and Tunisia at 2:30am local time on February 14 until February 18, according to a statement by the Prime Minister. The anniversary of the start of the uprising falls on February 17. Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan said that international flights would also be suspended at all airports except for those in the capital Tripoli and second largest city Benghazi in the east, according to state news agency Lana. Security services were placed on alert, and checkpoints have been established across Tripoli ahead of the anniversary.

Monsanto takes home $23m from small farmers; seeks to maintain ‘seed oligarchy’

The lawsuits concern Monsanto’s patent rights as the company strives to prevent farmers from replanting crops grown from the company’s seeds. It’s a concept that a study published on Tuesday – titled ‘Seed Giants vs. US Farmers’ – referred to as creating a “seed oligarchy.”

In the report, the Center for Food Safety (CFS) said it discovered 142 patent infringement suits against 410 farmers and 56 small businesses in more than 27 states as of December 2012. The amount of money pocketed by Monsanto comes to a whopping $23 million. The study was co-produced by the Save our Seeds (SOS) campaign.

Another case is now on the horizon, and it’s drawing wide public attention: The verdict of the trial will determine who controls the rights to seeds planted in the ground. It will also determine whether patent owners of other products which can make copies of themselves – such as stem cells and strains of bacteria used for medical research – and can continue to control the use of their products after selling them. It’s a scenario that wasn’t even considered until recently.

It’s been dubbed a ‘David and Goliath’ trial by many, as multi-billion-dollar Monsanto goes head to head against 75-year-old Indiana farmer Vernon Hugh Bowman, who said that fighting for justice is his main concern.“I really don’t consider it as David and Goliath,” Bowman told the Guardian. “I don’t think of it in those terms. I think of it in terms of right and wrong.”

In Washington DC, man callously billed for ambulance that arrived after his father passed away

When 71-year-old Durand Ford Sr. was struggling to breathe on New Year’s Day, his family called 911. But the man died waiting for an ambulance that took 40 minutes to arrive – and that man’s family has now received a $780.85 ambulance bill.

The hefty bill adds insult to injury. Durand Ford Jr., whose father died waiting for help that came too late, said he is angry about the city’s behavior. His 71-year-old father went into cardiac arrest on New Year’s Eve and his family called 911 shortly after 1 am, seeking emergency medical assistance.

Like & favorite us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @ThePeoplesRec, follow us on Tumblr (or via RSS feed) @ http://thepeoplesrecord.com, and check this post out & consider joining us!


Is Occupy Wall Street outperforming the Red Cross in hurricane relief?
November 4, 2012
In Sunset Park, a predominantly Mexican and Chinese neighborhood in South Brooklyn, St. Jacobi’s Church was one of the go-to hubs for people who wanted to donate food, clothing, and warm blankets or volunteer help other New Yorkers who were still suffering in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.  On Saturday, Ethan Murphy, one of the people heading the kitchen operation, estimated they would prepare and send out 10,000 meals to people in need. Thousands and thousands of pounds of clothes were being sorted, labeled, and distributed, and valuable supplies like heaters and generators were being loaded up in cars to be taken out to the Rockaways, Staten Island and other places in need.  However, this well-oiled operation wasn’t organized by the Red Cross, New York Cares, or some other well-established volunteer group. This massive effort was the handiwork of none other than Occupy Wall Street—the effort is known as Occupy Sandy.


The scene at St. Jacobis on Saturday was friendly, orderly chaos.  Unlike other shelters that had stopped collecting donations or were looking for volunteers with special skills such as medical training, Occupy Sandy was ready to take anyone willing to help. A wide range of people pitched in, including a few small children making peanut butter sandwiches, but most volunteers were in their 20s and 30s. A large basement rec room had become a hive of vegetable chopping and clothes bagging. They held orientations throughout the day for new volunteers. One of the orientation leaders, Ian Horst, who has been involved with a local group called Occupy Sunset Park for the past year, says he was “totally blown away by the response” and the sheer numbers of people who showed up and wanted to help. He estimated that he’d given an orientation to 200 people in the previous hour.


By midday, a line stretched all the way down the block of people who’d already attended orientation and were waiting for rides to be dispatched to volunteer. Kiley Edgley and Eric Schneider had been waiting about 20 minutes and were toward the front of the line. Like several people I spoke to, the fact that this effort was being organized by the occupy movement wasn’t a motivating factor—they found out about the opportunity to volunteer online and just wanted to help.


So how did an offshoot of Occupy Wall Street, best known as a leaderless movement that brought international attention to issues of economic injustice through the occupation of Zucotti Park in the financial district last year, become a leader in local hurricane relief efforts?  Ethan Murphy, who was helping organize the food at St. Jacobis and had been cooking for the occupy movement over the past year, explained there wasn’t any kind of official decision or declaration that occupiers would now try to help with the hurricane aftermath.  “This is what we do already, “ he explained: Build community, help neighbors, and create a world without the help of finance.  Horst said, “We know capitalism is broken, so we have already been focused on organizing to take care of our own [community] needs.” He sees Occupy Sandy as political ideas executed on a practical level.


As frustration grows around the city about the pace and effectiveness of the response from FEMA, and other government agencies and the Red Cross, I imagine both concerned New Yorkers and storm victims alike will remember who was out on the front lines.
Source

Is Occupy Wall Street outperforming the Red Cross in hurricane relief?

November 4, 2012

In Sunset Park, a predominantly Mexican and Chinese neighborhood in South Brooklyn, St. Jacobi’s Church was one of the go-to hubs for people who wanted to donate food, clothing, and warm blankets or volunteer help other New Yorkers who were still suffering in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.  On Saturday, Ethan Murphy, one of the people heading the kitchen operation, estimated they would prepare and send out 10,000 meals to people in need. Thousands and thousands of pounds of clothes were being sorted, labeled, and distributed, and valuable supplies like heaters and generators were being loaded up in cars to be taken out to the Rockaways, Staten Island and other places in need.  However, this well-oiled operation wasn’t organized by the Red Cross, New York Cares, or some other well-established volunteer group. This massive effort was the handiwork of none other than Occupy Wall Street—the effort is known as Occupy Sandy.

The scene at St. Jacobis on Saturday was friendly, orderly chaos.  Unlike other shelters that had stopped collecting donations or were looking for volunteers with special skills such as medical training, Occupy Sandy was ready to take anyone willing to help. A wide range of people pitched in, including a few small children making peanut butter sandwiches, but most volunteers were in their 20s and 30s. A large basement rec room had become a hive of vegetable chopping and clothes bagging. They held orientations throughout the day for new volunteers. One of the orientation leaders, Ian Horst, who has been involved with a local group called Occupy Sunset Park for the past year, says he was “totally blown away by the response” and the sheer numbers of people who showed up and wanted to help. He estimated that he’d given an orientation to 200 people in the previous hour.

By midday, a line stretched all the way down the block of people who’d already attended orientation and were waiting for rides to be dispatched to volunteer. Kiley Edgley and Eric Schneider had been waiting about 20 minutes and were toward the front of the line. Like several people I spoke to, the fact that this effort was being organized by the occupy movement wasn’t a motivating factor—they found out about the opportunity to volunteer online and just wanted to help.

So how did an offshoot of Occupy Wall Street, best known as a leaderless movement that brought international attention to issues of economic injustice through the occupation of Zucotti Park in the financial district last year, become a leader in local hurricane relief efforts?  Ethan Murphy, who was helping organize the food at St. Jacobis and had been cooking for the occupy movement over the past year, explained there wasn’t any kind of official decision or declaration that occupiers would now try to help with the hurricane aftermath.  “This is what we do already, “ he explained: Build community, help neighbors, and create a world without the help of finance.  Horst said, “We know capitalism is broken, so we have already been focused on organizing to take care of our own [community] needs.” He sees Occupy Sandy as political ideas executed on a practical level.

As frustration grows around the city about the pace and effectiveness of the response from FEMA, and other government agencies and the Red Cross, I imagine both concerned New Yorkers and storm victims alike will remember who was out on the front lines.

Source

Much of the East Coast is shut down today as residents prepare for Hurricane Sandy, a massive storm that could impact up to 50 million people from the Carolinas to Boston. The storm has already killed 66 people in the Caribbean, where it battered Haiti and Cuba.

“This thing is stitched together from elements natural and unnatural, and it seems poised to cause real havoc,” says Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org. New York and other cities have shut down schools and transit systems. Hundreds of thousands of people have already been evacuated. Millions could lose power over the next day. Meteorologists say Sandy could be the largest storm ever to hit the U.S. mainland. The megastorm comes at a time when President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney have refused to make climate change an issue on the campaign trail. For the first time since 1984, climate change was never addressed during a presidential debate. "It’s really important that everybody, even those who aren’t in the kind of path of this storm, reflect about what it means that in the warmest year in U.S. history, … in a year when we saw, essentially, summer sea ice in the Arctic just vanish before our eyes, what it means that we’re now seeing storms of this unprecedented magnitude," McKibben says. "If there was ever a wake-up call, this is it."

Source

Judge rules that millions can sue NYPD over stop-and-friskOctober 23, 2012
A federal judge in New York has given the go ahead for a class action lawsuit to move forward against the city’s police department over allegations that its stop-and-frisk program has continuously allowed officers to discriminate against minorities.
In a ruling made Wednesday by US District Judge Shira Scheindlin, the pending suit against the NYPD, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and others was granted class action status.
Authorities seem nonplussed.
When asked for his take on Judge Scheindlin’s decision, NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly told the New York Times that he had no comment because the litigation was continuing, but offered one quip: “It is what it is.”
Mayor Bloomberg also said he couldn’t comment specifically on the ruling, but, according to the Associated Press, had some words nonetheless.
"Nobody should ask Ray Kelly to apologize – he&#8217;s not going to and neither am I – for saving 5,600 lives. And I think it&#8217;s fair to say that stop, question and frisk has been an essential part of the NYPD&#8217;s work; it&#8217;s taken more than 6,000 guns off the streets in the last eight years, and this year we are on pace to have the lowest number of murders in recorded history. … We&#8217;re not going to do anything that undermines that trend and threatens public safety,” said the mayor.
For others, however, it doesn’t seem as clear cut; in her ruling, Judge Scheindlin decries, &#8220;First, suspicionless stops should never occur.”
The current case began to take hold all the way back in 2008 when attorneys representing four plaintiffs first began seeking class action status. The four original named plaintiffs say that they were wrongfully stopped and frisked based on their race. In only 2011, the NYPD stopped 685,724 New Yorkers, reports the American Civil Liberties Union. In all, 89 percent of those stopped were either black or Latino. Of the nearly 700,000 cases in that year alone, 88 percent of the people stopped were found innocent. Such statistics are largely typical for previous years, although one thing that has changed as time has gone on is the number of pedestrians stopped by law enforcement.
“[T]he policing policies that the city has implemented over the past decade and half have led to a dramatic increase in the number of pedestrian stops, to the point of now reaching almost 600,000 a year,” Judge Scheindlin wrote of the case earlier this year.
Now anyone that feels they have been victimized similarly by the New York Police Department by means of an invasive and unwarranted search since 2005 can add their name to the case.
By way of the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk policies, police officers in the Big Apple are allowed to conduct searches of suspicious persons if they have reason to believe that they are committing a crime. Statistics documenting the history of the program reveal, however, that skin color seems to play a pivotal role when the police are left to decide who is frisked and who isn’t.
Judge Scheindlin says it is unlikely that many people will sign on to the case, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t many who would be excluded from doing so. The NYPD has already stopped and frisked more than 200,000 people on the streets of New York in the first three months of 2012 alone; between 2004 and 2009, around 2.8 million similar stops were carried out.
“This case presents an issue of great public concern: the disproportionate number of Blacks and Latinos, as compared to Whites, who become entangled in the criminal justice system,” the judge writes in her ruling. “The specific claims raised in this case are narrower but they are raised in the context of the extensively documented racial disparities in the rates of stops, arrests, convictions, and sentences that continue through the present day.”
Elsewhere in her ruling, Judge Scheindlin says that the NYPD’s arguments in favor of the program appear “cavalier”and display “a deeply troubling apathy towards New Yorkers’ most fundamental constitutional rights.”
In a statement offered to the AP, the law office for the city of New York says, "We respectfully disagree with the decision and are reviewing our legal options."
Source
In the words of NYPD commissioner Ray Kelly, &#8220;It is what it is&#8221; - Legalized racial profiling.

Judge rules that millions can sue NYPD over stop-and-frisk
October 23, 2012

A federal judge in New York has given the go ahead for a class action lawsuit to move forward against the city’s police department over allegations that its stop-and-frisk program has continuously allowed officers to discriminate against minorities.

In a ruling made Wednesday by US District Judge Shira Scheindlin, the pending suit against the NYPD, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and others was granted class action status.

Authorities seem nonplussed.

When asked for his take on Judge Scheindlin’s decision, NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly told the New York Times that he had no comment because the litigation was continuing, but offered one quip: “It is what it is.”

Mayor Bloomberg also said he couldn’t comment specifically on the ruling, but, according to the Associated Press, had some words nonetheless.

"Nobody should ask Ray Kelly to apologize – he’s not going to and neither am I – for saving 5,600 lives. And I think it’s fair to say that stop, question and frisk has been an essential part of the NYPD’s work; it’s taken more than 6,000 guns off the streets in the last eight years, and this year we are on pace to have the lowest number of murders in recorded history. … We’re not going to do anything that undermines that trend and threatens public safety,” said the mayor.

For others, however, it doesn’t seem as clear cut; in her ruling, Judge Scheindlin decries, “First, suspicionless stops should never occur.”

The current case began to take hold all the way back in 2008 when attorneys representing four plaintiffs first began seeking class action status. The four original named plaintiffs say that they were wrongfully stopped and frisked based on their race. In only 2011, the NYPD stopped 685,724 New Yorkers, reports the American Civil Liberties Union. In all, 89 percent of those stopped were either black or Latino. Of the nearly 700,000 cases in that year alone, 88 percent of the people stopped were found innocent. Such statistics are largely typical for previous years, although one thing that has changed as time has gone on is the number of pedestrians stopped by law enforcement.

“[T]he policing policies that the city has implemented over the past decade and half have led to a dramatic increase in the number of pedestrian stops, to the point of now reaching almost 600,000 a year,” Judge Scheindlin wrote of the case earlier this year.

Now anyone that feels they have been victimized similarly by the New York Police Department by means of an invasive and unwarranted search since 2005 can add their name to the case.

By way of the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk policies, police officers in the Big Apple are allowed to conduct searches of suspicious persons if they have reason to believe that they are committing a crime. Statistics documenting the history of the program reveal, however, that skin color seems to play a pivotal role when the police are left to decide who is frisked and who isn’t.

Judge Scheindlin says it is unlikely that many people will sign on to the case, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t many who would be excluded from doing so. The NYPD has already stopped and frisked more than 200,000 people on the streets of New York in the first three months of 2012 alone; between 2004 and 2009, around 2.8 million similar stops were carried out.

“This case presents an issue of great public concern: the disproportionate number of Blacks and Latinos, as compared to Whites, who become entangled in the criminal justice system,” the judge writes in her ruling. “The specific claims raised in this case are narrower but they are raised in the context of the extensively documented racial disparities in the rates of stops, arrests, convictions, and sentences that continue through the present day.”

Elsewhere in her ruling, Judge Scheindlin says that the NYPD’s arguments in favor of the program appear “cavalier”and display “a deeply troubling apathy towards New Yorkers’ most fundamental constitutional rights.”

In a statement offered to the AP, the law office for the city of New York says, "We respectfully disagree with the decision and are reviewing our legal options."

Source

In the words of NYPD commissioner Ray Kelly, “It is what it is” - Legalized racial profiling.

This past Saturday at 12:30&#160;pm, Washington Square Park erupted in protest
October 23, 2012
The anti-2031-plan contingency, including the Faculty Against the Sexton Plan and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (and the obligatory Occupy protestors), rallied alongside a group called the All In The Red, an activist network raising awareness about student debt. This kickoff to the “Stop the Purple Monster” march drew about 100 students, alumni, and inhabitants of the Village. The university was hosting its Alumni Day events, and the goal of the marchers was to pleasantly inform the alumni of NYU’s massive expansion plan and gain some supporters in the process.
Many demonstrators dressed in red and purple were live-vlogging and live-tweeting the event. There was a band dressed like leprechauns, a dancing purple “NYU Student Debt” monster, and angry dollar sign puppets on scene.
About fifteen minutes into this Alice-in-Wonderland-like trip, faculty member Adam Becker gave a speech explaining their plea:

“Without consultation with its faculty or its neighbors, NYU administration has decided to expand in Greenwich Village, and this is monstrous&#8230; 2031 is the finish date, but how long does construction usually take in New York City? And it will cost a fortune. This is monstrous. This expansion will lead to higher tuition and more student debt. This is monstrous. Our elected officials … have betrayed us! Where does all this monstrousness come from? Greed, arrogance, and our failure to respond to it.”

Becker made it clear that the rally meant to protest NYU’s administration and the 2031 plan, not the NYU institution in general. Passing by, one anonymous Occupier remarked, “It feels like one of those pyramid schemes … except they’re juggling and gambling with our education, which is just sick. And our green spaces! Then you have to look forward to the 55% unemployment rate when you graduate.”
Many raised the complaint that not enough students and families were informed, hence the march through NYU’s Alumni Day festivities.
The City Council approved the expansion plan by a 44-to-1 vote this past July, after the proposed buildings’ sizes were reduced. NYU officials are confident that the plan will begin its construction process, unless the NYU faculty-led lawsuit against it gains traction.
For background on the details of plan, check out our previous coverage. Also see our most recent report on the backlash.
Source

This past Saturday at 12:30 pm, Washington Square Park erupted in protest

October 23, 2012

The anti-2031-plan contingency, including the Faculty Against the Sexton Plan and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (and the obligatory Occupy protestors), rallied alongside a group called the All In The Red, an activist network raising awareness about student debt. This kickoff to the “Stop the Purple Monster” march drew about 100 students, alumni, and inhabitants of the Village. The university was hosting its Alumni Day events, and the goal of the marchers was to pleasantly inform the alumni of NYU’s massive expansion plan and gain some supporters in the process.

Many demonstrators dressed in red and purple were live-vlogging and live-tweeting the event. There was a band dressed like leprechauns, a dancing purple “NYU Student Debt” monster, and angry dollar sign puppets on scene.

About fifteen minutes into this Alice-in-Wonderland-like trip, faculty member Adam Becker gave a speech explaining their plea:

“Without consultation with its faculty or its neighbors, NYU administration has decided to expand in Greenwich Village, and this is monstrous… 2031 is the finish date, but how long does construction usually take in New York City? And it will cost a fortune. This is monstrous. This expansion will lead to higher tuition and more student debt. This is monstrous. Our elected officials … have betrayed us! Where does all this monstrousness come from? Greed, arrogance, and our failure to respond to it.”

Becker made it clear that the rally meant to protest NYU’s administration and the 2031 plan, not the NYU institution in general. Passing by, one anonymous Occupier remarked, “It feels like one of those pyramid schemes … except they’re juggling and gambling with our education, which is just sick. And our green spaces! Then you have to look forward to the 55% unemployment rate when you graduate.”

Many raised the complaint that not enough students and families were informed, hence the march through NYU’s Alumni Day festivities.

The City Council approved the expansion plan by a 44-to-1 vote this past July, after the proposed buildings’ sizes were reduced. NYU officials are confident that the plan will begin its construction process, unless the NYU faculty-led lawsuit against it gains traction.

For background on the details of plan, check out our previous coverage. Also see our most recent report on the backlash.

Source

US drones kill up to 80% civilians – Pakistan Interior Minister
October 18, 2012
The absolute majority of the people killed by American UAVs in Pakistan are innocent civilians, claims Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik. If given the drone technology, Pakistan can do the job better, he argued earlier.
Malik revealed that according to Islamabad calculates, the number of drone attacks in recent years totaled to 336 episodes, of which 96 were launched from Afghanistan.
There are no exact statistics of people killed in drone strikes in Pakistan. Estimates vary from about 2.500 to over 3,000 victims. Reportedly as many as 174 of them were children.
The latest US study claimed that only 2 per cent of drone strike casualties in Pakistan are top militants.
The researchers at Stanford and New York University also claimed that the American drone strike policy in Pakistan has not helped Washington achieve its goal of curbing terrorism in the region. The civilian deaths that mark practically every drone strike on terror suspects in Pakistan’s tribal regions have achieved the opposite goal: locals hate the US because of the unceasing fear that death may come from above at any moment.
Most of the strikes have been made in North Waziristan province, a militant stronghold against which Islamabad is considering a fully-fledged military operation. Civilian deaths have been causing outcry in Pakistan, which ultimately forbade the US military transit to Afghanistan for months as a result. Pakistani government has repeatedly demanded Washington to cease drone strikes, but the program continues despite all the odds.
Source

US drones kill up to 80% civilians – Pakistan Interior Minister

October 18, 2012

The absolute majority of the people killed by American UAVs in Pakistan are innocent civilians, claims Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik. If given the drone technology, Pakistan can do the job better, he argued earlier.

Malik revealed that according to Islamabad calculates, the number of drone attacks in recent years totaled to 336 episodes, of which 96 were launched from Afghanistan.

There are no exact statistics of people killed in drone strikes in Pakistan. Estimates vary from about 2.500 to over 3,000 victims. Reportedly as many as 174 of them were children.

The latest US study claimed that only 2 per cent of drone strike casualties in Pakistan are top militants.

The researchers at Stanford and New York University also claimed that the American drone strike policy in Pakistan has not helped Washington achieve its goal of curbing terrorism in the region. The civilian deaths that mark practically every drone strike on terror suspects in Pakistan’s tribal regions have achieved the opposite goal: locals hate the US because of the unceasing fear that death may come from above at any moment.

Most of the strikes have been made in North Waziristan province, a militant stronghold against which Islamabad is considering a fully-fledged military operation. Civilian deaths have been causing outcry in Pakistan, which ultimately forbade the US military transit to Afghanistan for months as a result. Pakistani government has repeatedly demanded Washington to cease drone strikes, but the program continues despite all the odds.

Source

From Food &amp; Water Watch:
&#8220;Although he&#8217;d like to ignore it, Governor Cuomo&#8217;s inbox keeps piling higher and higher with mail urging him to ban fracking. 
This week we and our New Yorkers Against Fracking friends delivered more than 160,000 ban fracking petitions to his office, on top of more than 250,000 delivered this summer. The mail sure does pile up! 
Help make sure Governor Cuomo never sees the bottom of his inbox by signing a petition telling him to ban fracking now. We&#8217;ll be sure to deliver it.&#8221;

From Food & Water Watch:

Although he’d like to ignore it, Governor Cuomo’s inbox keeps piling higher and higher with mail urging him to ban fracking.

This week we and our New Yorkers Against Fracking friends delivered more than 160,000 ban fracking petitions to his office, on top of more than 250,000 delivered this summer. The mail sure does pile up!

Help make sure Governor Cuomo never sees the bottom of his inbox by signing a petition telling him to ban fracking now. We’ll be sure to deliver it.”

The New York City Police Department (NYPD) really has gone rogue; at least that&#8217;s what a high-level FBI official believes.
September 05, 2012
Among the 5 million emails the group Anonymous hacked from the servers of private intelligence firm Stratfor in February, one seems to not only confirm the controversial NYPD surveillance activities uncovered by the Associated Press, but hints at even worse civil liberties violations not yet disclosed. Anonymous later turned the emails over to WikiLeaks, with which Truthout has entered into an investigative partnership.

I keep telling you, you and I are going to laugh and raise a beer one day, when everything Intel (NYPD&#8217;s Intelligence Division) has been involved in during the last 10 years comes out - it always eventually comes out. They are going to make Hoover, COINTEL, Red Squads, etc look like rank amatures [sic] compared to some of the damn right felonious activity, and violations of US citizen&#8217;s rights they have been engaged in. 

The description of alleged NYPD excesses was leveled by an unnamed FBI &#8220;senior official&#8221; in late November 2011, in an email sent to Fred Burton, vice president for intelligence at the Austin, Texas-based Stratfor and former deputy chief of the counterterrorism division at the State Department. Burton  then sent the official&#8217;s email to what appears to be a listserv known as the &#8220;Alpha List.&#8221;
Burton did not identify the senior FBI official in the email he sent to the listserv. He describes him as a &#8220;close personal friend,&#8221; and claims he &#8220;taught him everything that he knows.&#8221; He also instructs members of the listserv not to publish the contents of the email and to use it only for background.
Stratfor, in a statement released after some of the emails were made public, said some of the emails &#8220;may be forged or altered to include inaccuracies; some may be authentic&#8221; but &#8220;having had our property stolen, we will not be victimized twice by submitting to questioning about them.&#8221;
What&#8217;s particularly stunning about the FBI senior official&#8217;s description of NYPD Intelligence Division activities, is how he connects them to previous instances when his own agency bent and broke the law in pursuit of intelligence on perceived enemies of the state throughout the 20th century - and concludes the NYPD Intelligence Division&#8217;s violations are worse. As Pulitzer Prize-winning author and former New York Times reporter Tim Weiner writes in his new book, "Enemies: A History of the FBI," the Bureau has been &#8220;America&#8217;s closest counterpart&#8221; to a secret police.
Source

The New York City Police Department (NYPD) really has gone rogue; at least that’s what a high-level FBI official believes.

September 05, 2012

Among the 5 million emails the group Anonymous hacked from the servers of private intelligence firm Stratfor in February, one seems to not only confirm the controversial NYPD surveillance activities uncovered by the Associated Pressbut hints at even worse civil liberties violations not yet disclosed. Anonymous later turned the emails over to WikiLeaks, with which Truthout has entered into an investigative partnership.

I keep telling you, you and I are going to laugh and raise a beer one day, when everything Intel (NYPD’s Intelligence Division) has been involved in during the last 10 years comes out - it always eventually comes out. They are going to make Hoover, COINTEL, Red Squads, etc look like rank amatures [sic] compared to some of the damn right felonious activity, and violations of US citizen’s rights they have been engaged in. 

The description of alleged NYPD excesses was leveled by an unnamed FBI “senior official” in late November 2011, in an email sent to Fred Burton, vice president for intelligence at the Austin, Texas-based Stratfor and former deputy chief of the counterterrorism division at the State Department. Burton  then sent the official’s email to what appears to be a listserv known as the “Alpha List.”

Burton did not identify the senior FBI official in the email he sent to the listserv. He describes him as a “close personal friend,” and claims he “taught him everything that he knows.” He also instructs members of the listserv not to publish the contents of the email and to use it only for background.

Stratfor, in a statement released after some of the emails were made public, said some of the emails “may be forged or altered to include inaccuracies; some may be authentic” but “having had our property stolen, we will not be victimized twice by submitting to questioning about them.”

What’s particularly stunning about the FBI senior official’s description of NYPD Intelligence Division activities, is how he connects them to previous instances when his own agency bent and broke the law in pursuit of intelligence on perceived enemies of the state throughout the 20th century - and concludes the NYPD Intelligence Division’s violations are worse. As Pulitzer Prize-winning author and former New York Times reporter Tim Weiner writes in his new book, "Enemies: A History of the FBI," the Bureau has been “America’s closest counterpart” to a secret police.

Source

New York activists take a stand against frackingAugust 27, 2012
Today in Albany, hundreds of people took part in a protest pressing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to ban all fracking statewide. It’s unlikely to happen; an announcement on areas where fracking will be allowed could come as early as next week. But a key way to influence an elected official is to demonstrate popular support for an issue — so to Albany they went. Citizen Action has an overview of the protest.
Meanwhile, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who previously made a massive contribution to the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign, was making his own fracking news.

The Environmental Defense Fund has been awarded a 3-year, $6 million grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies for its work to minimize the impacts of natural gas production through hydraulic fracturing. The funding will support the organization’s strategy of securing strong rules and developing industry best practices in states with intense natural gas production.
“Here’s the truth on natural gas. The environmentalists who oppose all fracking are wrong, and the drillers who claim that regulation will kill the industry are wrong. What we need to do is make sure that the gas is extracted carefully and in the right places, and that has to be done through strong, responsible regulation. And that’s what our work with EDF is all about,” said Michael R. Bloomberg, philanthropist and Mayor of New York City.

The growth in natural-gas extraction, largely due to fracking, is responsible for the U.S.’ reduced use of coal to generate power and, in part, for our decreased CO2 emissions. In its statement on the grant, EDF articulates how it will push for stronger regulation of natural-gas operations, including: disclosing all chemicals used in the hydraulic-fracturing process, minimizing water consumption, protecting groundwater, and improving air-pollution controls, including capturing released methane.
Food and Water Watch, which has been strongly advocating against fracking in the state, expressed “shock” at EDF for accepting the grant, pledging that “[f]ractivists will never stand still and allow EDF or any other group to come into their state with weak ‘model legislation’ that is simply an industry proposal in disguise.”
Fracking is likely headed for New York despite those fracktivists, most likely limited to regions on the southern edge of the state. (An aside: The term “fracktivists” is lame.) And if reports that fracking companies got an early look at the proposal are to be believed, the plan is likely to satisfy almost no one at all.
Source

New York activists take a stand against fracking
August 27, 2012

Today in Albany, hundreds of people took part in a protest pressing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to ban all fracking statewide. It’s unlikely to happen; an announcement on areas where fracking will be allowed could come as early as next week. But a key way to influence an elected official is to demonstrate popular support for an issue — so to Albany they went. Citizen Action has an overview of the protest.

Meanwhile, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who previously made a massive contribution to the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign, was making his own fracking news.

The Environmental Defense Fund has been awarded a 3-year, $6 million grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies for its work to minimize the impacts of natural gas production through hydraulic fracturing. The funding will support the organization’s strategy of securing strong rules and developing industry best practices in states with intense natural gas production.

“Here’s the truth on natural gas. The environmentalists who oppose all fracking are wrong, and the drillers who claim that regulation will kill the industry are wrong. What we need to do is make sure that the gas is extracted carefully and in the right places, and that has to be done through strong, responsible regulation. And that’s what our work with EDF is all about,” said Michael R. Bloomberg, philanthropist and Mayor of New York City.

The growth in natural-gas extraction, largely due to fracking, is responsible for the U.S.’ reduced use of coal to generate power and, in part, for our decreased CO2 emissions. In its statement on the grant, EDF articulates how it will push for stronger regulation of natural-gas operations, including: disclosing all chemicals used in the hydraulic-fracturing process, minimizing water consumption, protecting groundwater, and improving air-pollution controls, including capturing released methane.

Food and Water Watch, which has been strongly advocating against fracking in the state, expressed “shock” at EDF for accepting the grant, pledging that “[f]ractivists will never stand still and allow EDF or any other group to come into their state with weak ‘model legislation’ that is simply an industry proposal in disguise.”

Fracking is likely headed for New York despite those fracktivists, most likely limited to regions on the southern edge of the state. (An aside: The term “fracktivists” is lame.) And if reports that fracking companies got an early look at the proposal are to be believed, the plan is likely to satisfy almost no one at all.

Source