justryingtoblendin
america-wakiewakie:

Oakland Spent $74 Million Settling 417 Police Brutality Lawsuits | Oakland Police Beat

A Catholic priest who said an officer put him in a chokehold and slammed his head into a glass door. A woman who said she shouldn’t have been handcuffed when officers arrested her.
A father who claimed officers beat him in the hallway outside of his child’s hospital room until his head was bloody. A bank robber who was shot by officers after a high-speed chase. A man whose head was slammed into something so hard that the bones in his face broke.
In each situation the Oakland Police Department was sued. And in each one, the City of Oakland chose to settle out of court rather than take the case to trial.
A review of Oakland City Attorney lawsuit data and hundreds of federal and state court cases has found that since 1990, Oakland has spent $74 million dollars to settle at least 417 lawsuits accusing its police officers of brutality, misconduct and other civil rights violations.


Oakland spends more on civil-rights police lawsuits than nearly any other California law enforcement agency, with multimillion-dollar settlements coming directly out of funds that could go to libraries, police and fire services or road repair.
Supporters of the Oakland Police Department say that high number is a reflection of the city’s willingness to settle at any cost. But Oakland Police Beat’s analysis found that the City of Oakland has successfully defended itself against many lawsuits it considers to be unfounded.
Our investigation found that more than 500 officers were named in those lawsuits. At least 72 of those officers were named in three or more of the suits. Settlement amounts per lawsuits range from $100 to the nearly $11 million paid out following the so-called Riders scandal, where more than 100 plaintiffs accused officers of beating, kidnapping and planting evidence on suspects.
Historically, the number of OPD-related lawsuits filed against the city varies from year to year. But over the last three years the number of cases settled dropped, leaving some — like Oakland civil rights attorney Jim Chanin — cautiously hopeful that long-sought-after reforms are beginning to impact the Oakland Police Department.
(Pictured: An Occupy Oakland protester is arrested in the early morning hours of Thurs, November 3, 2011 in Frank Ogawa Plaza. Lawsuits alleging excessive force by OPD officers during the demonstrations have cost the city more than $6 million in settlements. Photo by Elijah Nouvelage)
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america-wakiewakie:

Oakland Spent $74 Million Settling 417 Police Brutality Lawsuits | Oakland Police Beat

A Catholic priest who said an officer put him in a chokehold and slammed his head into a glass door. A woman who said she shouldn’t have been handcuffed when officers arrested her.

A father who claimed officers beat him in the hallway outside of his child’s hospital room until his head was bloody. A bank robber who was shot by officers after a high-speed chase. A man whose head was slammed into something so hard that the bones in his face broke.

In each situation the Oakland Police Department was sued. And in each one, the City of Oakland chose to settle out of court rather than take the case to trial.

A review of Oakland City Attorney lawsuit data and hundreds of federal and state court cases has found that since 1990, Oakland has spent $74 million dollars to settle at least 417 lawsuits accusing its police officers of brutality, misconduct and other civil rights violations.

Oakland spends more on civil-rights police lawsuits than nearly any other California law enforcement agency, with multimillion-dollar settlements coming directly out of funds that could go to libraries, police and fire services or road repair.

Supporters of the Oakland Police Department say that high number is a reflection of the city’s willingness to settle at any cost. But Oakland Police Beat’s analysis found that the City of Oakland has successfully defended itself against many lawsuits it considers to be unfounded.

Our investigation found that more than 500 officers were named in those lawsuits. At least 72 of those officers were named in three or more of the suits. Settlement amounts per lawsuits range from $100 to the nearly $11 million paid out following the so-called Riders scandal, where more than 100 plaintiffs accused officers of beating, kidnapping and planting evidence on suspects.

Historically, the number of OPD-related lawsuits filed against the city varies from year to year. But over the last three years the number of cases settled dropped, leaving some — like Oakland civil rights attorney Jim Chanin — cautiously hopeful that long-sought-after reforms are beginning to impact the Oakland Police Department.

(Pictured: An Occupy Oakland protester is arrested in the early morning hours of Thurs, November 3, 2011 in Frank Ogawa Plaza. Lawsuits alleging excessive force by OPD officers during the demonstrations have cost the city more than $6 million in settlements. Photo by Elijah Nouvelage)

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US marshals shoot unarmed man in Albuquerque, seize cell phone cameras from witnesses April 2, 2014
As Albuquerque residents take to the streets to protest against the ongoing slayings of citizens by their local police department, federal agents got into the act by opening fire on an unarmed man Tuesday morning, then seizing cameras from witnesses.
But more citizens with cameras arrived on the scene as a group of U.S. Marshals stood around the victim, Gilberto Angelo Serrano, proving unafraid to voice their displeasure at the trigger-happy culture that apparently has seeped into all levels of law enforcement in Albuquerque.
Realizing they were outnumbered by cameras, the U.S. Marshals could only ask people to stand back, not bothering to try and stop them from recording as they tried to wrap a bandage around the head of the man they had just shot, who was laying on the sidewalk bleeding.
But a witness named Gabriel Valdez said the Marshals confiscated his cell phone camera as well as his mother’s camera as “evidence,” when he did not even start recording until after the shooting.
The incident took place around 10 a.m. when a group of Marshals were trying to apprehend a fugitive who was driving his truck.
According to KRQE:

“Get out of the car! Get out of the vehicle! And then boom! She shot like right away. She just shot right away,” Gabriel Valdez said.
That’s how one witness describes the gunfire that rang out in the South Valley Tuesday morning.
“He never pulled out a gun, nothing,” one witness told KRQE News 13. “His hands were on the steering wheel.”
“This is enough! This is ridiculous!” another witness said.
KRQE News 13 talked to one witness who says he had his cell phone taken away from him.
“I have evidence on there they said because I have video on there, not video of the actual shooting, but of everything else,” Valdez said.

In an interview with a New Mexico live streamer, Valdez said that the Marshals first asked to see what he had recorded, so he handed them the phone.
Then once they had the phone in their hands, they refused to return it to him, not even to allow him to write down telephone numbers he had on the phone. That segment of the interview begins at 5:16 in this video.
Full article

US marshals shoot unarmed man in Albuquerque, seize cell phone cameras from witnesses 
April 2, 2014

As Albuquerque residents take to the streets to protest against the ongoing slayings of citizens by their local police department, federal agents got into the act by opening fire on an unarmed man Tuesday morning, then seizing cameras from witnesses.

But more citizens with cameras arrived on the scene as a group of U.S. Marshals stood around the victim, Gilberto Angelo Serrano, proving unafraid to voice their displeasure at the trigger-happy culture that apparently has seeped into all levels of law enforcement in Albuquerque.

Realizing they were outnumbered by cameras, the U.S. Marshals could only ask people to stand back, not bothering to try and stop them from recording as they tried to wrap a bandage around the head of the man they had just shot, who was laying on the sidewalk bleeding.

But a witness named Gabriel Valdez said the Marshals confiscated his cell phone camera as well as his mother’s camera as “evidence,” when he did not even start recording until after the shooting.

The incident took place around 10 a.m. when a group of Marshals were trying to apprehend a fugitive who was driving his truck.

According to KRQE:

“Get out of the car! Get out of the vehicle! And then boom! She shot like right away. She just shot right away,” Gabriel Valdez said.

That’s how one witness describes the gunfire that rang out in the South Valley Tuesday morning.

“He never pulled out a gun, nothing,” one witness told KRQE News 13. “His hands were on the steering wheel.”

“This is enough! This is ridiculous!” another witness said.

KRQE News 13 talked to one witness who says he had his cell phone taken away from him.

“I have evidence on there they said because I have video on there, not video of the actual shooting, but of everything else,” Valdez said.

In an interview with a New Mexico live streamer, Valdez said that the Marshals first asked to see what he had recorded, so he handed them the phone.

Then once they had the phone in their hands, they refused to return it to him, not even to allow him to write down telephone numbers he had on the phone. That segment of the interview begins at 5:16 in this video.

Full article

redupnyc

redupnyc:

Throughout his mayoral campaign, Bill de Blasio promised New York City residents that part of his office’s platform on public health would be ending the incredibly destructive practice of using condoms as evidence. The position showed up on the campaign’s response to PROP’s Voters’ Education Guide; in media inquiries into de Blasio’s positions as Public Advocate; even on de Blasio’s campaign website, billdeblasio.com. Unfortunately the Mayor has not acted on his promise to New Yorkers.

Not only has there been no response from the Mayor’s Office about our request for an immediate executive order ending the use of condoms as evidence, recent arrest records show that as of January 12th the NYPD are still seizing condoms as evidence. While the NYPD still maintains that this practice is either not used or rarely used, on the arrest forms in Kings County there is a section specifically to indicate the number of condoms seized during the arrest. 

We ask that all New York City residents tell Mayor de Blasio to keep his promise and protect our city’s public health by issuing an executive order banning the practice of using condoms as evidence of prostitution-related offenses by the police or prosecutors. Here is a script you can use:

"Hi my name is ______________ and I live in (Bronx/Brooklyn/Manhattan/Queens/Staten Island). I am (calling/writing) to ask that Mayor Bill de Blasio immediately issue an executive order ending the use of condoms as evidence of prostitution-related offenses. The Mayor listed ending the use of condoms as evidence on his campaign website last year as part of his platform on public health, but your office has failed to act on this critical issue. Using condoms as evidence is detrimental to the health of all New York City residents, and especially those vulnerable to HIV transmission. It also has resulted in the sort of police racial profiling of Black and Latina queer youth and trans women, that the Mayor campaigned against last year. I am asking the Mayor to please stick to his promises to promote public health and end racist policing in New York City by issuing an executive order to end the practice of condoms as evidence. Thank you."

You can email the Mayor’s office at emmawolfe@gmail.com or can participate on our call-in tomorrow Thursday 27th 12pm-3pm by calling this number (212) 788-3000.


This is extremely important. I work with sex workers in NYC & arrests have increased significantly this year because of this practice of using condoms as evidence. Arrests of homeless people on the street/trains, jaywalking, panhandling, etc. have also gone up under Police Commissioner Bill Bratton’s “broken windows” policing. 

De Blasio & Bratton have been nearly the same as Bloomberg & Kelly so far.

Down with the police state, racial profiling & criminalization of sex work now!

288 protesters detained at anti-police brutality march in Montreal
March 16, 2014

Police gave protesters at the annual demonstration against police brutality just minutes before the riot squad encircled the crowd and detained 288 people on Saturday.

Lines of riot police blocked the streets around the protest at Jean-Talon St. and Chateaubriand Ave., funnelling protesters to the south down Chateaubriand, where they were immediately encircled.

The protesters were charged under municipal bylaw P-6, which requires organizers of a protest to provide their itinerary to police.

Two people suffered minor injuries during the police intervention, police spokesperson Ian Lafrenière said.  

The protest began under a heavy police presence, including cavalry, a helicopter and dozens of riot police from the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal and the Sûreté du Québec.

“It was a veritable army of police … who occupied the area surrounding the Jean-Talon métro when the protest was to start,” the Collective Opposed to Police Brutality, which organizes the annual protest, said in a written statement issued after the protest.

The COBP organized this year’s march to protest what it called “social cleansing” of homeless and marginalized citizens by police.

“The COBP denounces the fact that the SPVM has yet again demonstrated that it is incapable of tolerating protests against its brutality and police impunity,” the organization said.

The police had a different view.

“They refused to share their itinerary, and they refused to give us any details. When we got there, we asked them not to jump onto the street, and they answered by going into the street and yelling at us that they were not cooperating,” Lafrenière said. (LOL)

Police made several arrests over the next few hours as small groups of protesters moved through the neighbourhood, occasionally blocking traffic.

“The reason we apply P-6 is to prevent problems. In a case like this, with the history that we have — that protest has been going on for 18 years and unfortunately 15 years of that it went wrong,” Lafrenière said.

In past years, the protest has often devolved into vandalism and rioting, but this year police reported only two major acts of mischief. Both a police van and a CBC/Radio-Canada truck were damaged and spray-painted.

“We are still conducting investigations in regard to the mischief,” Lafrenière said.

The 288 people detained under bylaw P-6 will receive a ticket for participating in an illegal protest.

“It looks good in the media — the police can say (all of these) people were arrested, were breaking windows and stuff, but it’s not true. They were doing nothing,” said Claudine Lamothe, who narrowly escaped arrest when police surrounded the demonstration.

The first arrested protesters were released after about an hour, while others were still in police custody and waiting to be processed as of 7 p.m. The four who may face criminal charges will be held for longer, Lafrenière said.

Tamim Sujat, a McGill student and photo editor at The McGill Daily, one of the university’s campus newspapers, was among the group arrested at the beginning of the protest.

“(The police) said ‘You’re not supposed to be loitering around with cameras where you’re not supposed to be,’” Sujat said.

Sujat said he plans to contest the $638 fine with the help of the newspaper’s lawyer. Police did not recognize his student press credentials, he added.

“They said the only thing we can do is let you out before other people,” Sujat said. 

Source

TW: Police brutality, racist violence - Cops strap black woman to chair, pepper spray her & cut off her hair February 3, 2014
It’s the kind of story that you wouldn’t believe unless you saw it with your own eyes. Thankfully, this story was caught on surveillance video, so we can do just that.
Charda Gregory, 22, had allegedly trashed a hotel room. She was taken into custody by Michigan police, then pepper sprayed in jail, slammed against a wall and strapped down to a chair.
It was then that officer Bernadette Najor took out a pair of scissors and started hacking away at Gregory’s hair.
The officer tried to justify her actions in the police report, saying that the hair was a “suicide risk.” Thankfully, this resulted in charges against Gregory being dropped, and Najor being fired. But had this not been caught on video, who knows what would have happened.
Other officers involved are now under investigation.
Watch the video at your own risk.

TW: Police brutality, racist violence - Cops strap black woman to chair, pepper spray her & cut off her hair 
February 3, 2014

It’s the kind of story that you wouldn’t believe unless you saw it with your own eyes. Thankfully, this story was caught on surveillance video, so we can do just that.

Charda Gregory, 22, had allegedly trashed a hotel room. She was taken into custody by Michigan police, then pepper sprayed in jail, slammed against a wall and strapped down to a chair.

It was then that officer Bernadette Najor took out a pair of scissors and started hacking away at Gregory’s hair.

The officer tried to justify her actions in the police report, saying that the hair was a “suicide risk.” Thankfully, this resulted in charges against Gregory being dropped, and Najor being fired. But had this not been caught on video, who knows what would have happened.

Other officers involved are now under investigation.

Watch the video at your own risk.

Activists to protest NYPD’s handling of murder of Islan NettlesJanuary 29, 2014
On Thursday, Jan. 30 at 4 p.m., a coalition of representatives from New York City human rights organizations will protest the NYPD’s negligence in the immediate aftermath of the brutal beating death of transgender woman, Islan Nettles. The protest at One Police Plaza demands an explanation by incoming NYC Police Commissioner William Bratton and the NYPD for its initial malfeasance on the case and demands a report on the current status of the homicide investigation by NY County District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr.
"The transgender and cisgender communities together call on William Bratton and the NYPD to set an example with the Islan Nettles case by committing to seeing justice served, not only for Islan Nettles, but for all victims of transphobic violence in New York City," said Brooke Cerda, founder of the Transgender/Cisgender Coalition.
Endorsers include the Transgender/Cisgender Coalition, ACT UP/NY, Luz’s Daughter Cares, Trans Women of Color Collective (TWOCC), Harlem Pride, LGBT Faith Leaders of African Descent, Strategic Trans Alliance for Radical Reform (STARR), Jamaica Anti-Homophobia Stand, Ali Forney Center, VOCAL-NY, ETNYC and Make the Road.
Several glaringly obvious breaches of procedure stand out about this case. At midnight on Aug. 17, 2013, Paris Wilson, accompanied by friends, flirted with Islan Nettles in Harlem, directly across the street from Police Service Area 6 at 2770 Frederick Douglass Boulevard, between West 147th and West 148th Street. (Public Service Area 6 covers the 24th, 26th, and 32nd Precincts.)
Upon realizing Nettles was transgender, Wilson became enraged and began to harass Nettles and her transgender companions with transphobic slurs. Wilson began punching Nettles vigorously in the face until she fell to the pavement, slamming her head on concrete, according to the NYPD. Notified by one of Nettles’ friends, police officers arrived at the scene and pulled Wilson off Nettles, who was then transported to Harlem Hospital and admitted with severe head trauma.
Officers at Police Service Area 6 did not question Nettles’ companions thoroughly and never checked on Nettles’ condition after her admittance to Harlem Hospital, according to law enforcement sources. Officers at the scene never obtained DNA evidence from Wilson’s hands. Investigations were halted until Aug. 23, when the D.A.’s office learned that Nettles was declared brain dead and removed from life support. When asked about crucial footage from the ten surveillance cameras located on the PSA 6 edifice and on surrounding structures, the D.A.’s office said all cameras were broken and no footage existed.
After the assault, Simone Wilson, mother of Paris Wilson, coerced an inebriated friend of her son to confess to the crime but he later denied the allegations, according to the NYPD. Shockingly, Simone Wilson was never held accountable for falsifying evidence or for hindering the investigation. Nettles’ friends and family also report that Simone Wilson aggressively photographed them at Harlem Hospital, as if threatening them if they filed charges.
Following a misdemeanor charge of third degree assault, Paris Wilson was immediately released from jail on a mere $2,000 bail and on Nov. 19 even that charge was dropped due to “lack of evidence.” The D.A.’s office has since said it is “aggressively investigating the crime as a homicide,” but no suspect or statement on the progress of the investigation has been presented in the two months since the investigation began.
The Jan. 30 protest calls for the NYPD to explain its failure to immediately and adequately investigate the crime scene, question witnesses, retain DNA samples and surveillance footage and check on Nettles’ condition, even if the crime was initially misperceived as merely an assault.
We call for the NYPD to explain why Simone Wilson has never been charged with obstruction of justice. We demand that D.A. Vance provide a status report on the investigation. Finally, we call for the NYPD to audit the 24, 26, and 32 Precincts and all city precincts for their capacity to conduct timely and unbiased investigations of this and all transphobic violent crimes.
Life expectancy for transgender women of color is 23 years, according to the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. The Trans Murder Monitoring Project reports that on average one trans person is murdered per month in the U.S., most of them women of color.
The protest will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 30 at One Police Plaza in Manhattan. For more information, call 718-924-3322 or visit http://luzsdaughtercares.wordpress.com/tag/justice-for-islan-nettles/
Source
I’ll be out there tomorrow - spread the word, let’s get a big crowd out there & demand justice for Islan <3

Activists to protest NYPD’s handling of murder of Islan Nettles
January 29, 2014

On Thursday, Jan. 30 at 4 p.m., a coalition of representatives from New York City human rights organizations will protest the NYPD’s negligence in the immediate aftermath of the brutal beating death of transgender woman, Islan Nettles. The protest at One Police Plaza demands an explanation by incoming NYC Police Commissioner William Bratton and the NYPD for its initial malfeasance on the case and demands a report on the current status of the homicide investigation by NY County District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr.

"The transgender and cisgender communities together call on William Bratton and the NYPD to set an example with the Islan Nettles case by committing to seeing justice served, not only for Islan Nettles, but for all victims of transphobic violence in New York City," said Brooke Cerda, founder of the Transgender/Cisgender Coalition.

Endorsers include the Transgender/Cisgender Coalition, ACT UP/NY, Luz’s Daughter Cares, Trans Women of Color Collective (TWOCC), Harlem Pride, LGBT Faith Leaders of African Descent, Strategic Trans Alliance for Radical Reform (STARR), Jamaica Anti-Homophobia Stand, Ali Forney Center, VOCAL-NY, ETNYC and Make the Road.

Several glaringly obvious breaches of procedure stand out about this case. At midnight on Aug. 17, 2013, Paris Wilson, accompanied by friends, flirted with Islan Nettles in Harlem, directly across the street from Police Service Area 6 at 2770 Frederick Douglass Boulevard, between West 147th and West 148th Street. (Public Service Area 6 covers the 24th, 26th, and 32nd Precincts.)

Upon realizing Nettles was transgender, Wilson became enraged and began to harass Nettles and her transgender companions with transphobic slurs. Wilson began punching Nettles vigorously in the face until she fell to the pavement, slamming her head on concrete, according to the NYPD. Notified by one of Nettles’ friends, police officers arrived at the scene and pulled Wilson off Nettles, who was then transported to Harlem Hospital and admitted with severe head trauma.

Officers at Police Service Area 6 did not question Nettles’ companions thoroughly and never checked on Nettles’ condition after her admittance to Harlem Hospital, according to law enforcement sources. Officers at the scene never obtained DNA evidence from Wilson’s hands. Investigations were halted until Aug. 23, when the D.A.’s office learned that Nettles was declared brain dead and removed from life support. When asked about crucial footage from the ten surveillance cameras located on the PSA 6 edifice and on surrounding structures, the D.A.’s office said all cameras were broken and no footage existed.

After the assault, Simone Wilson, mother of Paris Wilson, coerced an inebriated friend of her son to confess to the crime but he later denied the allegations, according to the NYPD. Shockingly, Simone Wilson was never held accountable for falsifying evidence or for hindering the investigation. Nettles’ friends and family also report that Simone Wilson aggressively photographed them at Harlem Hospital, as if threatening them if they filed charges.

Following a misdemeanor charge of third degree assault, Paris Wilson was immediately released from jail on a mere $2,000 bail and on Nov. 19 even that charge was dropped due to “lack of evidence.” The D.A.’s office has since said it is “aggressively investigating the crime as a homicide,” but no suspect or statement on the progress of the investigation has been presented in the two months since the investigation began.

The Jan. 30 protest calls for the NYPD to explain its failure to immediately and adequately investigate the crime scene, question witnesses, retain DNA samples and surveillance footage and check on Nettles’ condition, even if the crime was initially misperceived as merely an assault.

We call for the NYPD to explain why Simone Wilson has never been charged with obstruction of justice. We demand that D.A. Vance provide a status report on the investigation. Finally, we call for the NYPD to audit the 24, 26, and 32 Precincts and all city precincts for their capacity to conduct timely and unbiased investigations of this and all transphobic violent crimes.

Life expectancy for transgender women of color is 23 years, according to the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. The Trans Murder Monitoring Project reports that on average one trans person is murdered per month in the U.S., most of them women of color.

The protest will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 30 at One Police Plaza in Manhattan. For more information, call 718-924-3322 or visit http://luzsdaughtercares.wordpress.com/tag/justice-for-islan-nettles/

Source

I’ll be out there tomorrow - spread the word, let’s get a big crowd out there & demand justice for Islan <3

Six arrested & charged at march for Jesus Huerta, who was murdered in police custody
January 21, 2014

Sunday night, a third march and vigil were held for Jesus Huerta who died two months ago. Jesus died in police custody while handcuffed in the back of a police car. Police allege that he shot himself in the head while handcuffed. In the United States, Jesus is this the third person of color alleged to have shot themselves in the head while handcuffed in the back of a police car in the last two years. Also, it is the third killing by Durham police under investigation by the SBI in recent months.

Durham riot cops have notoriously confronted and broken up or attacked previous rallies for Jesus, and this time was no different. A march of about 200 people took to the streets around 5:30 after leaving the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church chanting “JUSTICIA PARA CHUY, PRESENTE PRESENTE!” The march was going quite well, and was peaceful until lines of riot police confronted marchers and sent them scattering. Marchers then split up into groups, and headed back to the church for the vigil. Events were streamed live on Ustream, and videos from the protests and vigil as well as interviews with attendees are available here.

After police showed up, some marchers smashed windows of the police station, while others spray painted cop cars. But the majority of them were just trying to get back to the vigil without being teargassed or beaten.

Eight activists were taken into custody, and six were charged; some had not even taken part in the march and were trying to meet up with friends. One activist gave their account of the situation, and reported that while walking up the street and passing a parking lot, they saw about 10 people running down from the parking deck. Immediately, a number of police on bikes, motorcycles, in cars, and driving SUVs surrounded them and ordered them to get on the ground. One activist was kicked three times in the ribs while on the ground, and then everyone was searched. When police found nothing, they took all eight individuals into custody. Two caucasians were released immediately without charge, and two juveniles were picked up by their parents. One person made bond that night, while three others spent the night in jail, and were bonded out in the morning by a community fund. None of the individuals were arrested for vandalism, but were charged with unauthorized entry to a city parking facility, obstruction, and resisting arrest (police reportedthat the group they arrested were running from them). The activist who gave this account said, “I hope no one is discouraged by this, and I hope everyone still plans on attending the next march. I most certainly will.”

The community is holding a benefit concert to aid with the financial costs the family still faces over the death. Members of the Huerta family say they need help with burial expenses. El Centro Hispano is a nonprofit organization collecting the donations. Donations can be made directly or by mail at El Centro Hispano: 600 E. Main St. Durham, NC 27701, or through their website: elcentronc.org. In both cases designate “For Huerta Family.” Before the march, Evelin Huerta released a statement on behalf of the Huerta family clearing up rumors that the family was not in support of the marchers.

Source

fuckyeahmarxismleninism

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said Thursday he had no intention of ending the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk policy.

Asked by co-host Norah O’Donnell on “CBS This Morning” if he will halt stop-and-frisk, Bratton responded, “Not at all.”

The police commissioner went on to say, as he has before, that he wants to use it appropriately and explain to people why they are being stopped.

Bratton noted that Mayor Bill de Blasio “didn’t campaign against stop-and-frisk, he campaigned on reforming it.”

Durham police tear gas protesters seeking justice for youth who police say shot himself while handcuffed
December 20, 2013

A month after Jesús “Chuy” Huerta died in police custody, dozens of armored police officers assembled as an alliance of about 150 friends, families and protesters marched for a second time on the Durham Police Department Thursday evening.

Police, some dressed in riot gear and equipped with rifles and shotguns, assembled in rows around the building, waiting, as the marchers streamed toward police property around 7:30 p.m., demanding answers for a family’s pain.

Protest organizers and police alike had in prior days urged marchers to remain peaceful, hoping to avoid the window-breaking and small number of arrests that marked the first protest for Huerta.

Thursday’s march, however, ended with several more arrests. Firecrackers and at least one bottle was thrown by protesters. Then several canisters of gas discharged by police before the crowd finally dispersed around 9 p.m.

The uproar over Huerta’s death has calmed little in the last few weeks, seeming only to intensify with Chief Jose Lopez’s claim that the 17-year-old shot himself in the head while his hands were cuffed behind his back in a police cruiser.

Grief and anger coursed through the crowd Thursday as it ended its march from downtown to the police department, urged on by pounding drums. At the edge of the parking lot, the dozens of officers who had shadowed the march began to shout commands: “Exit the parking lot now!” Trespassers, they warned, would face arrest.

The crowd pushed into the lot. Huerta’s family and friends gathered around a light pole at the lot’s edge, while protesters with long black banners – “MURDERED BY POLICE,” one read – wrapped around the crowd’s edge.

A few in the crowd banged drums, some wore bandanas over their faces, a few cursed the police, shouting over the long cloth banners, and others wept while officers on loudspeakers again threatened arrest. There was no easy uniform description of the multi-ethnic, multi-generation crowd.

Rafael Estrada Maya, a coordinator, shouted time after time for quiet, so the family could leave their respects.

“We are praying! Respect prayer! Respect the dead,” he pleaded over a loudspeaker. Eventually, the crowd listened, falling quiet at the edge of the parking lot.

Then Evelin Huerta, Jesus Huerta’s sister, sometimes identified as Evelin Fernandez, took her turn to speak.

“Don’t say bad words – respect, please, please respect,” said Huerta, who’s been an emotional anchor and a public face for the protest movement. A drummer banged again. “Stop!” cried Huerta’s mother, Sylvia Huerta, sometimes identified as Sylvia Fernandez.

An officer called out again over his loudspeaker: Five minutes until the arrests began, he said. Evelin Huerta began to play a song by a Christian Latin pop duo over Maya’s bullhorn.

The circle of young women wept, then sobbed. Jesus Huerta’s mother and sister began to mouth the song’s words, and suddenly Evelin Huerta was singing them loud, above the other women’s cries.

“I know that we’re going to see you some day,” she said, kneeling with her mother to a fresh-laid shrine of candles and flowers. “We miss you. We miss you so much … But we will look for justice, Papi. But we will not leave your death … We love you, and we miss you to death. It wasn’t supposed to be this way.”

The police gave their two minute warning, and Maya on his bullhorn asked the crowd to leave in peace. They left, but marched back downtown with police following.

Once downtown, there was a final confrontation where young people chanted and threw firecrackers at the ranks of riot police. The police advanced, herding the marchers along Main Street, away from downtown. Two men were arrested, but the crowd finally dispersed after police released canisters of gas.

Source

NYPD must ditch discriminatory Muslim surveillance: Profiling is unconstitutional and counterproductiveNovember 3, 2013
Twice in the course of the last month, the New York City Police Department has been forced to defend its Muslim surveillance program in court. Police documents show that at least since 2003, the NYPD&#8217;s Intelligence Division intensively monitored the daily lives of law-abiding American Muslims in the city and surrounding areas. The department&#8217;s argument that there is no such program — it simply follow leads and goes where they take it — flies in the face of this publicly available evidence. And its refusal to acknowledge that Muslims may have legitimate concerns about surveillance will likely take the NYPD down the same unproductive path it followed with its stop-and-frisk program.
New York&#8217;s police force has long been criticized for its policy of stopping and searching people based on race rather than on suspicion of criminal activity. But instead of taking these complaints seriously, the police only ramped up the program. From 2002 to 2011, the number of stops by the NYPD increased some 600 percent; nearly nine of 10 people stopped were innocent of any wrongdoing. After a series of lawsuits, in August of this year a federal court found that the stop-and-frisk program amounted to an unconstitutional pattern and practice of racial profiling.
It is now well documented that the NYPD&#8217;s Demographics Unit secretly mapped Muslim communities. It created lists of bookshops, kebab houses, hookah bars and food stores frequented by Muslims, and it kept notes on the mundane conversations that officers overheard there. The NYPD also sent informants into mosques to eavesdrop on sermons and conversations among worshippers. It apparently wanted to gauge reactions to world and local events, such as the 2006 protests in parts of the Arab world about Danish cartoons depicting the Muslim prophet Muhammad and the small plane that accidentally crashed into a Manhattan building the same year. The result of this snooping: nothing. Yet all the chatter was dutifully logged.
So how does the NYPD defend these actions?
To a degree, the department has relied on the same losing strategy it deployed in the stop-and-frisk litigation. Faced with statistics showing that in the past decade 86 percent of people stopped by police were black or Latino, the NYPD argued that this proportion was only to be expected, because these groups committed the most crimes. But a federal court rejected this argument. &#8220;Rather than being a defense against the charge of racial profiling, however, this reasoning is a defense of racial profiling,&#8221; the judge wrote. In court hearings on the Muslim surveillance program, city lawyers have said that snooping on Muslims is only to be expected, because Muslims staged terrorist attacks in New York.
The NYPD simply refuses to understand that targeting all members of a religious group just because some among them have committed terrible crimes is the essence of unconstitutional profiling. In this, the department has the full backing of Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
When it comes to spying inside mosques, the NYPD says it is following the Handschu Guidelines. These were part of the settlement of a lawsuit over the NYPD’s 1970s-era spying on political groups. After the 9/11 attacks, the rules were loosened to allow the police to attend First Amendment-protected gatherings, such as demonstrations and religious services. But attendance is one thing, using undercover informants masquerading as devout Muslims is another. For that sort of involvement, the NYPD concedes that it needs some indication of criminality.
Full article

NYPD must ditch discriminatory Muslim surveillance: Profiling is unconstitutional and counterproductive
November 3, 2013

Twice in the course of the last month, the New York City Police Department has been forced to defend its Muslim surveillance program in court. Police documents show that at least since 2003, the NYPD’s Intelligence Division intensively monitored the daily lives of law-abiding American Muslims in the city and surrounding areas. The department’s argument that there is no such program — it simply follow leads and goes where they take it — flies in the face of this publicly available evidence. And its refusal to acknowledge that Muslims may have legitimate concerns about surveillance will likely take the NYPD down the same unproductive path it followed with its stop-and-frisk program.

New York’s police force has long been criticized for its policy of stopping and searching people based on race rather than on suspicion of criminal activity. But instead of taking these complaints seriously, the police only ramped up the program. From 2002 to 2011, the number of stops by the NYPD increased some 600 percent; nearly nine of 10 people stopped were innocent of any wrongdoing. After a series of lawsuits, in August of this year a federal court found that the stop-and-frisk program amounted to an unconstitutional pattern and practice of racial profiling.

It is now well documented that the NYPD’s Demographics Unit secretly mapped Muslim communities. It created lists of bookshops, kebab houses, hookah bars and food stores frequented by Muslims, and it kept notes on the mundane conversations that officers overheard there. The NYPD also sent informants into mosques to eavesdrop on sermons and conversations among worshippers. It apparently wanted to gauge reactions to world and local events, such as the 2006 protests in parts of the Arab world about Danish cartoons depicting the Muslim prophet Muhammad and the small plane that accidentally crashed into a Manhattan building the same year. The result of this snooping: nothing. Yet all the chatter was dutifully logged.

So how does the NYPD defend these actions?

To a degree, the department has relied on the same losing strategy it deployed in the stop-and-frisk litigation. Faced with statistics showing that in the past decade 86 percent of people stopped by police were black or Latino, the NYPD argued that this proportion was only to be expected, because these groups committed the most crimes. But a federal court rejected this argument. “Rather than being a defense against the charge of racial profiling, however, this reasoning is a defense of racial profiling,” the judge wrote. In court hearings on the Muslim surveillance program, city lawyers have said that snooping on Muslims is only to be expected, because Muslims staged terrorist attacks in New York.

The NYPD simply refuses to understand that targeting all members of a religious group just because some among them have committed terrible crimes is the essence of unconstitutional profiling. In this, the department has the full backing of Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

When it comes to spying inside mosques, the NYPD says it is following the Handschu Guidelines. These were part of the settlement of a lawsuit over the NYPD’s 1970s-era spying on political groups. After the 9/11 attacks, the rules were loosened to allow the police to attend First Amendment-protected gatherings, such as demonstrations and religious services. But attendance is one thing, using undercover informants masquerading as devout Muslims is another. For that sort of involvement, the NYPD concedes that it needs some indication of criminality.

Full article

Green activists navigate life in the post-privacy eraNovember 2, 2013
We now know that the U.S. government can obtain virtually any email, video and voice chat, videos, photos, Skype messages, file transfers, and social networking details it wants. We know that it can monitor the location, duration, and telephone numbers involved in any phone call on an ongoing, daily basis.  We know that it monitored the foreign officials who traveled to the G20 summit in 2009. We know that it has deliberately weakened the encryption software meant to protect financial transactions. We know that it has tapped into the fiber-optic cables connecting international servers so that it can copy, basically, any information that moves through them.
What does this mean for environmental activists, who, like the rest of us, increasingly organize their lives over the internet? “I remember in the past we used to tell each other to wipe our phone’s contacts before protests,”  says Joshua Kahn Russell, who once organized protests with the Ruckus Society and now is a global community manager with 350.org. “I can’t imagine activists doing that now, since the government and private companies have infinitely more access to our personal information that we freely provide through Facebook and other social networking sites.”
The ’90s and early ’00s were, arguably, the peak of government paranoia about the environmental movement. In 2005, John Lewis, the top FBI official in charge of domestic terrorism, declared that radical environmentalists were the No. 1 domestic terrorist threat. State, local, and federal officials dedicated a tremendous amount of time and effort to tracking down the disbanded members of The Family, an offshoot of the Earth Liberation Front that set fire to a car dealership, a ski resort, a horse slaughterhouse, and other sites in the Pacific Northwest. The FBI also spent three years monitoring Greenpeace [PDF] and put several members on the terrorism watch list, in an investigation that the Justice Department’s inspector general later ruled was improper.
If electronic surveillance is being used on environmental activists, there is not much sign of it yet. “We use everything from two-way radios to cellphones to internet to chat to Facebook to organize,” says Ramsey Sprague, a Texan who has worked with the Tar Sands Blockade. “We follow Basic Security Culture, which is just about being aware of what you are talking about, and who you are talking about it with.”
The most visible manifestation of surveillance in the environmental movement has been a rash of undercover agents. At times they have engaged in activities that blurred the lines between police work and entrapment; but for the most part, they’re a consistent enough presence that every experienced environmental group has a policy for dealing with them.
“It goes against the core values of inclusion to look at someone and say ‘That looks like a cop,’” says Sprague. “Although young officers do look very … sculpted. So you have them do outreach. Send them out to go talk to people who are really being affected by what oil companies are doing in their community.”
Both Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Sandy were visited by undercover informants, as were groups like the Great Plains Tar Sands Resistance. That organization figured out it was being monitored this March, after its plan to block the gates to TransCanada’s oil reserves in Cushing, Okla., was derailed by the sudden appearance of police officers, who began to pull over cars full of demonstrators before they even reached Cushing.
SourcePhoto: Tar Sands Blockade in Nacogdoches, Texas November 2012

Green activists navigate life in the post-privacy era
November 2, 2013

We now know that the U.S. government can obtain virtually any email, video and voice chat, videos, photos, Skype messages, file transfers, and social networking details it wants. We know that it can monitor the location, duration, and telephone numbers involved in any phone call on an ongoing, daily basis.  We know that it monitored the foreign officials who traveled to the G20 summit in 2009. We know that it has deliberately weakened the encryption software meant to protect financial transactions. We know that it has tapped into the fiber-optic cables connecting international servers so that it can copy, basically, any information that moves through them.

What does this mean for environmental activists, who, like the rest of us, increasingly organize their lives over the internet? “I remember in the past we used to tell each other to wipe our phone’s contacts before protests,”  says Joshua Kahn Russell, who once organized protests with the Ruckus Society and now is a global community manager with 350.org. “I can’t imagine activists doing that now, since the government and private companies have infinitely more access to our personal information that we freely provide through Facebook and other social networking sites.”

The ’90s and early ’00s were, arguably, the peak of government paranoia about the environmental movement. In 2005, John Lewis, the top FBI official in charge of domestic terrorism, declared that radical environmentalists were the No. 1 domestic terrorist threat. State, local, and federal officials dedicated a tremendous amount of time and effort to tracking down the disbanded members of The Family, an offshoot of the Earth Liberation Front that set fire to a car dealership, a ski resort, a horse slaughterhouse, and other sites in the Pacific Northwest. The FBI also spent three years monitoring Greenpeace [PDF] and put several members on the terrorism watch list, in an investigation that the Justice Department’s inspector general later ruled was improper.

If electronic surveillance is being used on environmental activists, there is not much sign of it yet. “We use everything from two-way radios to cellphones to internet to chat to Facebook to organize,” says Ramsey Sprague, a Texan who has worked with the Tar Sands Blockade. “We follow Basic Security Culture, which is just about being aware of what you are talking about, and who you are talking about it with.”

The most visible manifestation of surveillance in the environmental movement has been a rash of undercover agents. At times they have engaged in activities that blurred the lines between police work and entrapment; but for the most part, they’re a consistent enough presence that every experienced environmental group has a policy for dealing with them.

“It goes against the core values of inclusion to look at someone and say ‘That looks like a cop,’” says Sprague. “Although young officers do look very … sculpted. So you have them do outreach. Send them out to go talk to people who are really being affected by what oil companies are doing in their community.”

Both Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Sandy were visited by undercover informants, as were groups like the Great Plains Tar Sands Resistance. That organization figured out it was being monitored this March, after its plan to block the gates to TransCanada’s oil reserves in Cushing, Okla., was derailed by the sudden appearance of police officers, who began to pull over cars full of demonstrators before they even reached Cushing.

Source
Photo: Tar Sands Blockade in Nacogdoches, Texas November 2012

Court blocks NYPD Stop &amp; Frisk reforms, removes judge who found program unconstitutionalNovember 1, 2013
A sweeping set of changes to the New York City Police Department’s controversial &#8220;stop-and-frisk&#8221; program has been put on hold. In August, U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin found the program unconstitutional, saying police had relied on a &#8220;policy of indirect racial profiling&#8221; that led officers to routinely stop &#8220;blacks and Hispanics who would not have been stopped if they were white.&#8221; 
While she did not halt the use of stop-and-frisk, Scheindlin appointed a federal court monitor to oversee a series of reforms. The city appealed Scheindlin’s ruling, saying it made officers &#8220;passive and scared&#8221; to frisk suspects. On Thursday, it got what it was hoping for, and much more. 
An appeals court stayed the changes, effectively postponing the operations of the monitor, while allowing police officers to continue using stop-and-frisk tactics. 
In a striking move, the court also took the unusual step of removing Scheindlin from the case, saying she &#8220;ran afoul&#8221; of the judiciary’s code of conduct and compromised the &#8220;appearance of impartiality surrounding this litigation&#8221; by granting media interviews while the case was pending before her. 
All of this comes as stop-and-frisk has been a major issue in New York City’s mayoral election, which takes place this Tuesday. 
"The next mayor should consider withdrawing the appeal," says Sunita Patel, co-counsel on the stop-and-frisk federal class action lawsuit and a staff attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights. "Any fair-minded and neutral judge to look at the record … will come up with the same conclusion. There was a nine-week trial. There is 23,000 pages of evidence here, 8,000 pages of trial transcript. No one could come to a different conclusion than Judge Scheindlin."
Source

Court blocks NYPD Stop & Frisk reforms, removes judge who found program unconstitutional
November 1, 2013

A sweeping set of changes to the New York City Police Department’s controversial “stop-and-frisk” program has been put on hold. In August, U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin found the program unconstitutional, saying police had relied on a “policy of indirect racial profiling” that led officers to routinely stop “blacks and Hispanics who would not have been stopped if they were white.”

While she did not halt the use of stop-and-frisk, Scheindlin appointed a federal court monitor to oversee a series of reforms. The city appealed Scheindlin’s ruling, saying it made officers “passive and scared” to frisk suspects. On Thursday, it got what it was hoping for, and much more.

An appeals court stayed the changes, effectively postponing the operations of the monitor, while allowing police officers to continue using stop-and-frisk tactics.

In a striking move, the court also took the unusual step of removing Scheindlin from the case, saying she “ran afoul” of the judiciary’s code of conduct and compromised the “appearance of impartiality surrounding this litigation” by granting media interviews while the case was pending before her.

All of this comes as stop-and-frisk has been a major issue in New York City’s mayoral election, which takes place this Tuesday.

"The next mayor should consider withdrawing the appeal," says Sunita Patel, co-counsel on the stop-and-frisk federal class action lawsuit and a staff attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights. "Any fair-minded and neutral judge to look at the record … will come up with the same conclusion. There was a nine-week trial. There is 23,000 pages of evidence here, 8,000 pages of trial transcript. No one could come to a different conclusion than Judge Scheindlin."

Source

TW: Police brutality - Drunken off-duty deputy tried to arrest woman at bar when she resisted his advancesOctober 20, 2013
A drunken sheriff’s deputy was recorded during a strange and inappropriate altercation when he tried to arrest a female soldier at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in Columbia, because she allegedly turned down his advances.
On October 7th, 23-year-old Brittany Ball, a USMC member out of Fort Jackson, was allegedly upset at the restaurant when approached by Richland County Deputy Paul Allen Derrick.  She apparently did not want anything to do with him, which caused the aggressive deputy to become enraged and the two began to argue.
Derrick, a 17 year veteran, left the restaurant to go retrieve handcuffs and his gun from his vehicle, then returning to try and arrest Ball.  He was recorded screaming at her and barking orders as he twisted her arms behind her back.
The report states that Derrick handcuffed her, pulled her to her feet, and slammed her head into a metal table.
The video shows the berserking officer repeatedly ordering the woman to “STAND UP” and “SIT DOWN.”  While he held her in handcuffs against her will, he wrapped his arm around her neck and kept resting his hand on her breast.
“Let her go!” shouted a woman from off-camera.
Onlookers showed concern for the woman and told the raging officer that he had “crossed the line” and should let her go.   Restaurant-goers murmured that somebody should “call the “real cops.”
When a few men approached the officer, he threatened to arrest them.  “You wanna get an attitude?  STEP AWAY!!”
Shortly thereafter, Columbia police arrived.  They spoke to witnesses and saw the cell-phone video.  They ordered that Derrick release Ball, then took him into custody and charged him with assault and battery.
Sheriff Leon Lott initially backed Derrick — disagreeing with Columbia Police — saying that he had authority to make an arrest, suggesting that Ball was “resisting.”
After a week of pressure and reasoning, Sheriff Lott placed Derrick on leave without pay, according to WISTV.
Source

TW: Police brutality - Drunken off-duty deputy tried to arrest woman at bar when she resisted his advances
October 20, 2013

A drunken sheriff’s deputy was recorded during a strange and inappropriate altercation when he tried to arrest a female soldier at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in Columbia, because she allegedly turned down his advances.

On October 7th, 23-year-old Brittany Ball, a USMC member out of Fort Jackson, was allegedly upset at the restaurant when approached by Richland County Deputy Paul Allen Derrick.  She apparently did not want anything to do with him, which caused the aggressive deputy to become enraged and the two began to argue.

Derrick, a 17 year veteran, left the restaurant to go retrieve handcuffs and his gun from his vehicle, then returning to try and arrest Ball.  He was recorded screaming at her and barking orders as he twisted her arms behind her back.

The report states that Derrick handcuffed her, pulled her to her feet, and slammed her head into a metal table.

The video shows the berserking officer repeatedly ordering the woman to “STAND UP” and “SIT DOWN.”  While he held her in handcuffs against her will, he wrapped his arm around her neck and kept resting his hand on her breast.

“Let her go!” shouted a woman from off-camera.

Onlookers showed concern for the woman and told the raging officer that he had “crossed the line” and should let her go.   Restaurant-goers murmured that somebody should “call the “real cops.”

When a few men approached the officer, he threatened to arrest them.  “You wanna get an attitude?  STEP AWAY!!”

Shortly thereafter, Columbia police arrived.  They spoke to witnesses and saw the cell-phone video.  They ordered that Derrick release Ball, then took him into custody and charged him with assault and battery.

Sheriff Leon Lott initially backed Derrick — disagreeing with Columbia Police — saying that he had authority to make an arrest, suggesting that Ball was “resisting.”

After a week of pressure and reasoning, Sheriff Lott placed Derrick on leave without pay, according to WISTV.

Source

Save Food Not Bombs: Last Sunday, October 6th Sacramento Food Not Bombs was kicked out of the Cesar Chavez Park by the Sacramento police. Volunteers were greeted by about 15 officers when they arrived at the park when they normally do in time to start sharing the meal they created by 1:30pm. They were told that our stuff would be confiscated and we would get a summons due to an ordinance that has yet to even be passed that would prevent any group from handing out free hot meal in the park.Last week advocates for the poor were told to stop sharing meals with the hungry in Sacramento and Santa Monica, California, Taos, New Mexico, and Olympia, Washington.Groups were confronted and threatened with arrest in Boulder, Colorado; Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, Seattle, Washington and other cities across the United States this summer. In all over 50 cities in the United States have passed laws banning or limiting the sharing of meals with the hungry in the past two years with enforcement on the increase this fall.Our food is vegan, organic and no one has ever reported being made ill eating with Food Not Bombs. The goal of giving the public the impression we are required to get a permit is to justify forcing us to stop. We have no paid staff and our food is a gift and unregulated by the authorities. Like all acts of commission no permission from the government is necessary.Please support Sacramento Food Not Bombs. We will be risking arrest on Sunday, October 13, 2013 at Cesar Chavez Park at 1:30 PMKeith McHenryco-founder of the Food Not Bombs MovementP.O. Box 424Arroyo Seco, NM 87514 USA575-770-3377

Save Food Not Bombs: Last Sunday, October 6th Sacramento Food Not Bombs was kicked out of the Cesar Chavez Park by the Sacramento police. Volunteers were greeted by about 15 officers when they arrived at the park when they normally do in time to start sharing the meal they created by 1:30pm. They were told that our stuff would be confiscated and we would get a summons due to an ordinance that has yet to even be passed that would prevent any group from handing out free hot meal in the park.

Last week advocates for the poor were told to stop sharing meals with the hungry in Sacramento and Santa Monica, California, Taos, New Mexico, and Olympia, Washington.

Groups were confronted and threatened with arrest in Boulder, Colorado; Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, Seattle, Washington and other cities across the United States this summer. In all over 50 cities in the United States have passed laws banning or limiting the sharing of meals with the hungry in the past two years with enforcement on the increase this fall.

Our food is vegan, organic and no one has ever reported being made ill eating with Food Not Bombs. The goal of giving the public the impression we are required to get a permit is to justify forcing us to stop. We have no paid staff and our food is a gift and unregulated by the authorities. Like all acts of commission no permission from the government is necessary.

Please support Sacramento Food Not Bombs. We will be risking arrest on Sunday, October 13, 2013 at Cesar Chavez Park at 1:30 PM

Keith McHenry
co-founder of the Food Not Bombs Movement
P.O. Box 424
Arroyo Seco, NM 87514 USA
575-770-3377

NYPD designates mosques as terrorism organizationsAugust 28, 2013
The New York Police Department has secretly labeled entire mosques as terrorist organizations, a designation that allows police to use informants to record sermons and spy on imams, often without specific evidence of criminal wrongdoing.
Designating an entire mosque as a terrorism enterprise means that anyone who attends prayer services there is a potential subject of an investigation and fair game for surveillance.
Since the 9/11 attacks, the NYPD has opened at least a dozen &#8220;terrorism enterprise investigations&#8221; into mosques, according to interviews and confidential police documents. The TEI, as it is known, is a police tool intended to help investigate terrorist cells and the like.
Many TEIs stretch for years, allowing surveillance to continue even though the NYPD has never criminally charged a mosque or Islamic organization with operating as a terrorism enterprise.
The documents show in detail how, in its hunt for terrorists, the NYPD investigated countless innocent New York Muslims and put information about them in secret police files. As a tactic, opening an enterprise investigation on a mosque is so potentially invasive that while the NYPD conducted at least a dozen, the FBI never did one, according to interviews with federal law enforcement officials.
The strategy has allowed the NYPD to send undercover officers into mosques and attempt to plant informants on the boards of mosques and at least one prominent Arab-American group in Brooklyn, whose executive director has worked with city officials, including Bill de Blasio, a front-runner for mayor.
De Blasio said Wednesday on Twitter that he was &#8220;deeply troubled NYPD has labelled entire mosques &amp; Muslim orgs terror groups with seemingly no leads. Security AND liberty make us strong.&#8221;
The revelations about the NYPD&#8217;s massive spying operations are in documents recently obtained by The Associated Press and part of a new book, &#8220;Enemies Within: Inside the NYPD&#8217;s Secret Spying Unit and bin Laden&#8217;s Final Plot Against America.&#8221; The book by AP reporters Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman is based on hundreds of previously unpublished police files and interviews with current and former NYPD, CIA and FBI officials.
The disclosures come as the NYPD is fighting off lawsuits accusing it of engaging in racial profiling while combating crime. Earlier this month, a judge ruled that the department&#8217;s use of the stop-and-frisk tactic was unconstitutional.
The American Civil Liberties Union and two other groups have sued, saying the Muslim spying programs are unconstitutional and make Muslims afraid to practice their faith without police scrutiny.
Both Mayor Mike Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly have denied those accusations. Speaking Wednesday on MSNBC&#8217;s Morning Joe, Kelly reminded people that his intelligence-gathering programs began in the wake of 9/11.


"We follow leads wherever they take us," Kelly said. "We&#8217;re not intimidated as to wherever that lead takes us. And we&#8217;re doing that to protect the people of New York City."


Full article

NYPD designates mosques as terrorism organizations
August 28, 2013

The New York Police Department has secretly labeled entire mosques as terrorist organizations, a designation that allows police to use informants to record sermons and spy on imams, often without specific evidence of criminal wrongdoing.

Designating an entire mosque as a terrorism enterprise means that anyone who attends prayer services there is a potential subject of an investigation and fair game for surveillance.

Since the 9/11 attacks, the NYPD has opened at least a dozen “terrorism enterprise investigations” into mosques, according to interviews and confidential police documents. The TEI, as it is known, is a police tool intended to help investigate terrorist cells and the like.

Many TEIs stretch for years, allowing surveillance to continue even though the NYPD has never criminally charged a mosque or Islamic organization with operating as a terrorism enterprise.

The documents show in detail how, in its hunt for terrorists, the NYPD investigated countless innocent New York Muslims and put information about them in secret police files. As a tactic, opening an enterprise investigation on a mosque is so potentially invasive that while the NYPD conducted at least a dozen, the FBI never did one, according to interviews with federal law enforcement officials.

The strategy has allowed the NYPD to send undercover officers into mosques and attempt to plant informants on the boards of mosques and at least one prominent Arab-American group in Brooklyn, whose executive director has worked with city officials, including Bill de Blasio, a front-runner for mayor.

De Blasio said Wednesday on Twitter that he was “deeply troubled NYPD has labelled entire mosques & Muslim orgs terror groups with seemingly no leads. Security AND liberty make us strong.”

The revelations about the NYPD’s massive spying operations are in documents recently obtained by The Associated Press and part of a new book, “Enemies Within: Inside the NYPD’s Secret Spying Unit and bin Laden’s Final Plot Against America.” The book by AP reporters Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman is based on hundreds of previously unpublished police files and interviews with current and former NYPD, CIA and FBI officials.

The disclosures come as the NYPD is fighting off lawsuits accusing it of engaging in racial profiling while combating crime. Earlier this month, a judge ruled that the department’s use of the stop-and-frisk tactic was unconstitutional.

The American Civil Liberties Union and two other groups have sued, saying the Muslim spying programs are unconstitutional and make Muslims afraid to practice their faith without police scrutiny.

Both Mayor Mike Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly have denied those accusations. Speaking Wednesday on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, Kelly reminded people that his intelligence-gathering programs began in the wake of 9/11.

Full article