The People’s Record news update: three important Tibetan self-immolation news stories from the last week
February 25, 2013

On Tuesday February 20th, 2013: Two Tibetan teenagers killed themselves by self-immolation on Tuesday to protest Chinese rule in Tibet, according to reports on Wednesday by a Tibet advocacy group and Radio Free Asia. The two were among the youngest Tibetans to kill themselves in protest, and the act was a rare instance in which Tibetans committed self-immolation together.

Source

Reported yesterday: A young Tibetan traditional artist was sentenced to two years in jail with hard labor for having photos on his mobilephone of two compatriots who self-immolated in protest against Chinese rule, according to exile sources Saturday.

Ngawang Thupden, 20, was detained in October last year in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR), but relatives learned of the prison sentence for “subversion” only four months later, the sources said, citing contacts in the Himalayan region.

"His relatives and family couldn’t see him at all until he was sent to the Tuelung Shungpa jail near Lhasa," Tibetan Yeshi Gyaltsen, who lives near India’s hill town of Dharamsala, told RFA’s Tibetan Service.  "The relatives said there weren’t any court proceedings nor were family and relatives informed when he was sentenced,” he said.

According to Yeshi Gyaltsen, the relatives said they saw many other Tibetans, from the TAR’s Chamdo (in Chinese, Changdu) and Nagchu (Naqu) prefectures, serving sentences on unspecified charges at the same prison.

Chinese authorities have been cracking down hard on any efforts by Tibetans to publicize self-immolation protests after steps taken by Beijing to stop the burnings failed.

Some 104 Tibetans have so far set themsleves alight in protests questioning Chinese rule in Tibetan majority areas and calling for the return of Tibet’s spiritual leader the Dalai Lama.

Source

Today: Reports coming out of Tibet say a Tibetan man set himself on fire Sunday in China’s northwestern Qinghai province.

The 20-year-old man, identified as Phakmo Thondup, set himself ablaze at Ja Khyung Monastery in Haidong Prefecture, allegedly protesting China’s policies in Tibet.

Reports say monks from the monastery took him to a local hospital to be treated for burns. It was not immediately clear if his life was in danger.

A Tibetan with close contacts in the area tells VOA (Tibetan service) that a large contingent of Chinese security forces were dispatched to the Ja Khyung Monastery where the monks are praying for the victim’s life.

More than 100 Tibetans have set themselves on fire in the past three years to protest what they call China’s repression in Tibet.

Source

Four Tibetans self-immolate to protest Chinese ruleNovember 28, 2012
Four more ethnic Tibetans have self-immolated to protest Chinese rule and at least 20 were hospitalized after clashing with police in a protest over a government booklet calling the Tibetan language irrelevant, a report and exile groups said Tuesday.
More than 80 Tibetans in China have set themselves on fire since 2009 in protest against what overseas supporters say is China’s strict control over Tibet’s Buddhist culture and a suffocating security presence in Tibetan regions.
Four more self-immolations were reported Sunday and Monday in Gansu, Sichuan and Qinghai provinces.
At least 20 students were hospitalized Monday after a protest turned violent in Qinghai province’s Hainan prefecture, U.S. broadcaster Radio Free Asia said in an emailed statement that cited Tibetan exile sources who were in touch with Hainan residents. London-based exile group Free Tibet said up to 1,000 students took part in the demonstration.
Radio Free Asia said students were angry over a booklet distributed at Tsolho Medical Institute in Hainan that called Tibetan irrelevant and condemned immolation protests by Tibetans as “acts of stupidity.” It said students burned the books in their protest.
Hainan government and police officials referred calls to other departments where the phone rang unanswered on Tuesday.
The broadcaster also quoted anonymous sources inside China’s Tibetan areas as saying teenaged nun Sangay Dolmas died from self-immolation on Sunday in Qinghai’s Tongren county. On Monday, 18-year-old Kunchok Tsering died after burning himself in Gansu province’s Xiahe county while in Sichuan’s Seda country a 20-year-old former monk, Wang Gyal, self-immolated though his condition was not immediately known, it said.
Also Monday, in Gansu province’s Luqu county, 24-year-old Gonpo Tsering died after setting himself ablaze, the report said.
The Washington, D.C.-based International Campaign for Tibet said that as of Monday the toll in China’s Tibetan areas from self-immolations had reached 84, though the organization’s count did not include Gonpo Tsering.
Most of the protesters have doused themselves with gasoline and set themselves alight after shouting slogans calling for Tibetan independence and blessings for the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s exiled Buddhist leader. China blames him for encouraging the wave of self-immolations that Beijing has apparently been powerless to stop despite stepped-up security and an extensive spying network.
Independent verification of events and conditions in Tibet is nearly impossible because of restrictions on travel.
Source

Four Tibetans self-immolate to protest Chinese rule
November 28, 2012

Four more ethnic Tibetans have self-immolated to protest Chinese rule and at least 20 were hospitalized after clashing with police in a protest over a government booklet calling the Tibetan language irrelevant, a report and exile groups said Tuesday.

More than 80 Tibetans in China have set themselves on fire since 2009 in protest against what overseas supporters say is China’s strict control over Tibet’s Buddhist culture and a suffocating security presence in Tibetan regions.

Four more self-immolations were reported Sunday and Monday in Gansu, Sichuan and Qinghai provinces.

At least 20 students were hospitalized Monday after a protest turned violent in Qinghai province’s Hainan prefecture, U.S. broadcaster Radio Free Asia said in an emailed statement that cited Tibetan exile sources who were in touch with Hainan residents. London-based exile group Free Tibet said up to 1,000 students took part in the demonstration.

Radio Free Asia said students were angry over a booklet distributed at Tsolho Medical Institute in Hainan that called Tibetan irrelevant and condemned immolation protests by Tibetans as “acts of stupidity.” It said students burned the books in their protest.

Hainan government and police officials referred calls to other departments where the phone rang unanswered on Tuesday.

The broadcaster also quoted anonymous sources inside China’s Tibetan areas as saying teenaged nun Sangay Dolmas died from self-immolation on Sunday in Qinghai’s Tongren county. On Monday, 18-year-old Kunchok Tsering died after burning himself in Gansu province’s Xiahe county while in Sichuan’s Seda country a 20-year-old former monk, Wang Gyal, self-immolated though his condition was not immediately known, it said.

Also Monday, in Gansu province’s Luqu county, 24-year-old Gonpo Tsering died after setting himself ablaze, the report said.

The Washington, D.C.-based International Campaign for Tibet said that as of Monday the toll in China’s Tibetan areas from self-immolations had reached 84, though the organization’s count did not include Gonpo Tsering.

Most of the protesters have doused themselves with gasoline and set themselves alight after shouting slogans calling for Tibetan independence and blessings for the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s exiled Buddhist leader. China blames him for encouraging the wave of self-immolations that Beijing has apparently been powerless to stop despite stepped-up security and an extensive spying network.

Independent verification of events and conditions in Tibet is nearly impossible because of restrictions on travel.

Source

The People’s Record Daily News Update - Whose news? Our news!

November 9, 2012 

Here are some stories you may not otherwise hear about today:

  • Seven NAVY Seals face disciplinary action after consulting for EA on the videogame ‘Medal of Honor: Warfighter’ and “disclosing classified information”. While these soldiers will face “disciplinary action” for selling classified information, alleged Wikileaks informant Bradley Manning remains imprisoned without conviction for more than 900 days for leaking human rights violations and war crimes committed by the United States military. 

Follow us on Tumblr or by RSS feed for more daily updates.

Three teenage monks self-immolate in call for freedom for TibetNovember 8, 2012
In a desperate plea for freedom from the rule of China, three teenage Tibetan monks set themselves on fire today, pleading for the return of the Dalai Lama.
In the first documented case of a triple self-immolation,the trios, aged 15 and 16, set fire to themselves today,as the called for the freedom for Tibet.
A total of four Tibetans have set themselves on fire, the largest number of confirmed self-immolations in any one day.
The triple self-immolation took place at approximately 3pm local time today outside the gates of the local Public Security Bureau office in Gomang Township, Ngaba County, Eastern Tibet, which the Chinese refer to as being in the Sichuan province.
The boys called out for freedom in Tibet and for the return of the Dalai Lama as they set themselves on fire. Security forces arrived at the scene almost immediately.
The youngest monk, 15-year-old Dorjee, died at the scene.
His companions, 16-year-olds Samdup and Dorjee Kyab, were taken to hospital by security forces.
Their current whereabouts and wellbeing are unknown.
The other person to set themselves ablaze was a 23-year-old Tibetan nomadic woman.
Tamdin Tso (pictured) took petrol from a motorbike and set fire to herself in the family’s winter pasture. Tamdin Tso, who had a five year-old so, died at the scene after setting herself alight, near Rongwo in Rebkong County, Eastern Tibet.
Her body was taken back to her family’s home and local people gathered there to pray.   
Free Tibet Director Stephanie Brigden said: ‘These are the youngest Tibetans to set fire to themselves in protest at China’ s occupation. 
'This is also the largest single incident, yet another indication of the escalation of protests in Tibet.
'In just one day, on the eve of the Communist Party Congress, four Tibetans have set fire to themselves. 
'These protests are aimed at sending the next generation of China’s unelected regime a clear signal that Tibetans will continue to fight for their freedom despite China’s efforts to suppress and intimidate them.
'As the numbers of Tibetans willing to set themselves on fire grows, and protesters grow younger, the international community’s failure to hold China accountable becomes more outrageous.”
The boys were all from the same area, and belonged to Ngoshul Monastery, which houses around 130 monks, which is just outside Gomang Town, approximately 10km from Ngaba town where many people have self-immolated in the last 18 months.
Security forces have been deployed to Gomang and to Ngoshul Monastery.
Already heavy restrictions in the Ngaba County have been intensified.  
People are unable to leave or enter Ngaba town. These restrictions make it extremely difficult to obtain more detailed information about the situation.
Source

Three teenage monks self-immolate in call for freedom for Tibet
November 8, 2012

In a desperate plea for freedom from the rule of China, three teenage Tibetan monks set themselves on fire today, pleading for the return of the Dalai Lama.

In the first documented case of a triple self-immolation,the trios, aged 15 and 16, set fire to themselves today,as the called for the freedom for Tibet.

A total of four Tibetans have set themselves on fire, the largest number of confirmed self-immolations in any one day.

The triple self-immolation took place at approximately 3pm local time today outside the gates of the local Public Security Bureau office in Gomang Township, Ngaba County, Eastern Tibet, which the Chinese refer to as being in the Sichuan province.

The boys called out for freedom in Tibet and for the return of the Dalai Lama as they set themselves on fire. Security forces arrived at the scene almost immediately.

The youngest monk, 15-year-old Dorjee, died at the scene.

His companions, 16-year-olds Samdup and Dorjee Kyab, were taken to hospital by security forces.

Their current whereabouts and wellbeing are unknown.

The other person to set themselves ablaze was a 23-year-old Tibetan nomadic woman.

Tamdin Tso (pictured) took petrol from a motorbike and set fire to herself in the family’s winter pasture. Tamdin Tso, who had a five year-old so, died at the scene after setting herself alight, near Rongwo in Rebkong County, Eastern Tibet.

Her body was taken back to her family’s home and local people gathered there to pray.   

Free Tibet Director Stephanie Brigden said: ‘These are the youngest Tibetans to set fire to themselves in protest at China’ s occupation. 

'This is also the largest single incident, yet another indication of the escalation of protests in Tibet.

'In just one day, on the eve of the Communist Party Congress, four Tibetans have set fire to themselves. 

'These protests are aimed at sending the next generation of China’s unelected regime a clear signal that Tibetans will continue to fight for their freedom despite China’s efforts to suppress and intimidate them.

'As the numbers of Tibetans willing to set themselves on fire grows, and protesters grow younger, the international community’s failure to hold China accountable becomes more outrageous.”

The boys were all from the same area, and belonged to Ngoshul Monastery, which houses around 130 monks, which is just outside Gomang Town, approximately 10km from Ngaba town where many people have self-immolated in the last 18 months.

Security forces have been deployed to Gomang and to Ngoshul Monastery.

Already heavy restrictions in the Ngaba County have been intensified.  

People are unable to leave or enter Ngaba town. These restrictions make it extremely difficult to obtain more detailed information about the situation.

Source

Sri Lanka’s Buddhist monks protest Bangladesh violence
October 4, 2012
Hundreds of Buddhist monks demonstrated in Sri Lanka Thursday to protest a recent wave of violence targeting their religious community in Bangladesh.
Reverend Galagodawatte Ghanasara told the crowd in Colombo that Buddhists are hiding in jungles in fear of their lives after rampaging Muslims reportedly torched more than 20 temples and over 100 businesses in southern Bangladesh near the Burmese border.  He said innocent people have been massacred.
Meanwhile, Bangladesh’s high commissioner to Sri Lanka, Shafiur Rahman says some 800 people peacefully protested in front of the Bangladesh Embassy and had discussions with the staff.
A day earlier, the Associated Press reported that representatives of Sri Lanka’s minority Muslim community also condemned the violence and demanded that authorities punish those responsible.  The human rights group Amnesty International also released a statement urging Bangladeshi authorities to protect minority populations.
Thousands of Bangladeshi Muslims rioted Saturday and Sunday, targeting Buddhist temples in Cox Bazar and surrounding areas.  The attacks began after Muslims found a photo of a burned Quran and blamed it on a Buddhist man.
Bangladeshi Home Affairs Minister Mohiuddun Khan Alamgir has accused radical Islamists and opposition party activists of instigating the riots as a “premeditated and deliberate” attempt to disrupt communal harmony.
Bangladeshi authorities say they have detained about 300 people in connection with the riots.
Source

Sri Lanka’s Buddhist monks protest Bangladesh violence

October 4, 2012

Hundreds of Buddhist monks demonstrated in Sri Lanka Thursday to protest a recent wave of violence targeting their religious community in Bangladesh.

Reverend Galagodawatte Ghanasara told the crowd in Colombo that Buddhists are hiding in jungles in fear of their lives after rampaging Muslims reportedly torched more than 20 temples and over 100 businesses in southern Bangladesh near the Burmese border.  He said innocent people have been massacred.

Meanwhile, Bangladesh’s high commissioner to Sri Lanka, Shafiur Rahman says some 800 people peacefully protested in front of the Bangladesh Embassy and had discussions with the staff.

A day earlier, the Associated Press reported that representatives of Sri Lanka’s minority Muslim community also condemned the violence and demanded that authorities punish those responsible.  The human rights group Amnesty International also released a statement urging Bangladeshi authorities to protect minority populations.

Thousands of Bangladeshi Muslims rioted Saturday and Sunday, targeting Buddhist temples in Cox Bazar and surrounding areas.  The attacks began after Muslims found a photo of a burned Quran and blamed it on a Buddhist man.

Bangladeshi Home Affairs Minister Mohiuddun Khan Alamgir has accused radical Islamists and opposition party activists of instigating the riots as a “premeditated and deliberate” attempt to disrupt communal harmony.

Bangladeshi authorities say they have detained about 300 people in connection with the riots.

Source

Tibetan man sets himself on fire in protest against ChinaAugust 7, 2012 
A Tibetan man in southwest China set himself on fire Monday, the latest in a series of shocking protests against Chinese rule, an overseas human rights group said.
The man set himself alight along the main street of Ngaba which sits on the Tibet plateau in a Tibetan-inhabited area of China’s Sichuan province, the London-based Free Tibet said in a statement.
Local government officials in the town, known as Aba in Chinese, were not immediately available for comment.
Security personnel quickly extinguished the flames and took the man away in a security vehicle, the statement said.
He was believed to be still alive, although his upper body was badly burned, it added.
More than 40 people have set themselves on fire in recent months in Tibetan-inhabited areas of China in protest at repressive government policies, the group said, with most incidents linked to monks or former monks of Ngaba’s Kirti monastery.
Tibetans have long chafed under China’s rule over the vast Himalayan region, charging that Beijing has curbed religious freedoms and their culture is being eroded by an influx of Han Chinese, the country’s main ethnic group.
Source

Tibetan man sets himself on fire in protest against China
August 7, 2012 

A Tibetan man in southwest China set himself on fire Monday, the latest in a series of shocking protests against Chinese rule, an overseas human rights group said.

The man set himself alight along the main street of Ngaba which sits on the Tibet plateau in a Tibetan-inhabited area of China’s Sichuan province, the London-based Free Tibet said in a statement.

Local government officials in the town, known as Aba in Chinese, were not immediately available for comment.

Security personnel quickly extinguished the flames and took the man away in a security vehicle, the statement said.

He was believed to be still alive, although his upper body was badly burned, it added.

More than 40 people have set themselves on fire in recent months in Tibetan-inhabited areas of China in protest at repressive government policies, the group said, with most incidents linked to monks or former monks of Ngaba’s Kirti monastery.

Tibetans have long chafed under China’s rule over the vast Himalayan region, charging that Beijing has curbed religious freedoms and their culture is being eroded by an influx of Han Chinese, the country’s main ethnic group.

Source

I realized I should probably clarify:
July 17, 2012
You probably know this, but just in case the point of the image wasn’t clear from the picture alone, Al Jazeera is better than the New York Times not because the title was more well-written or funny or anything like that. Rather, the point of the image is that the New York Times is a biased, problematic tool for the corporate media to represent and propagate a neoliberal perspective on important world events.
So we see something like the protests that have broken out in response to the self-immolation in Israel and read the titles from two publications covering it and the stories are two entirely different stories, representing incompatible accounts of what is happening in the world. I think that disparity is rooted in the fact that the New York Times is consistently biased and partial toward the ruling class.
The pun in the Al Jazeera title is pretty bad but I think it’s cool that they’re actually covering the news and what is happening in the world and not intentionally downplaying the growing unrest in Israel. Russia Today is the only international news provider that I prefer to Al Jazeera.
-R.Cunningham
EDIT: Reading the responses to this is really interesting. I’m learning lots, thanks tumblr friends! There is obviously no room for unproblematic media within capitalism. Still, Al Jazeera and Russia Today tend to represent facts in a way that seems more consistent with reality, in my humble opinion - at least in terms of international protest news.

I realized I should probably clarify:

July 17, 2012

You probably know this, but just in case the point of the image wasn’t clear from the picture alone, Al Jazeera is better than the New York Times not because the title was more well-written or funny or anything like that. Rather, the point of the image is that the New York Times is a biased, problematic tool for the corporate media to represent and propagate a neoliberal perspective on important world events.

So we see something like the protests that have broken out in response to the self-immolation in Israel and read the titles from two publications covering it and the stories are two entirely different stories, representing incompatible accounts of what is happening in the world. I think that disparity is rooted in the fact that the New York Times is consistently biased and partial toward the ruling class.

The pun in the Al Jazeera title is pretty bad but I think it’s cool that they’re actually covering the news and what is happening in the world and not intentionally downplaying the growing unrest in Israel. Russia Today is the only international news provider that I prefer to Al Jazeera.

-R.Cunningham

EDIT: Reading the responses to this is really interesting. I’m learning lots, thanks tumblr friends! There is obviously no room for unproblematic media within capitalism. Still, Al Jazeera and Russia Today tend to represent facts in a way that seems more consistent with reality, in my humble opinion - at least in terms of international protest news.

6 Occupied nations who cannot celebrate their independence today:
1. Palestine: West Bank and Gaza have been under Israeli occupation since the Six Day War in 1967. Israel seized back Jerusalem form Jordan, and has since controlled the borders of the two disjointed territories of Palestine. Palestinians have faced extreme Israeli apartheid conditions, including restricted movement, unlawful detainment, house & town demolitions, restricted water & healthcare, terrorism by Israeli police & horrific violence.
2. Kurdistan: The Kurds are a distinct ethnic group in the Middle East. Large communities of Kurds live in eastern Turkey (Anatolia), Iran, northern Iraq, and northern Syria. This is due to the Treaty of Sèvres and partition of territories formerly ruled by the Ottoman Empire prior to WWI. There is a major discrimination against Kurds in their native regions, because they are not allowed to form any advocacy groups, political parties or any kind of representation of the Kurdish identity, not even a flag. 
3. Kabylia: Kabylia is a Berber-ethnic or Amazigh (English for “free men”) region in Northern Algeria. The Kabylia people are a distinct ethnic group from Arabs. They’re not native Arab speakers; their native language is the Kabyle language, or taqabilit. Most Kabylians loathe Pan-Arabism as they feel that it’s imposed on them by the Algerian government. French colonization of Algeria left the country in a severe identity crisis. The Algerian government is obnoxiously authoritarian and has oppressed any non-Arab movement since independence in 1962.
4. Tibet: Despite being geographically, culturally and linguistically distinct from China, Tibet is still not recognized by the People’s “Republic” of China as a separate state. During the 1960s, between 200,000 and 1,000,000 people died in Tibet under Mao Zedong’s government. Separatist movements are not allowed. Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso removed himself from heading the care-taker Tibetian government in March 14th, 2011.
5. Western Sahara: The Western Sahara is an issue in North Africa between Arab countries that share many cultural ties. It is a disputed territory between Morocco, who has claimed it since 1957 after its independence, and the armed indigenous front, Polisario, proclaiming a Sahrawi Arab Democratic state. The Western Sahara has been on the United Nations list of non-self-governing territories since 1963, but, to this day, it is still majorly controlled by Moroccan army. The Moroccan government has moved many of its citizens to the Western Sahara and blocked them from going back in attempt to claim legitimately the territory.
6. Northern Cyprus: Turkey has been occupying the Northern part of Cyprus, 36% of the region, since 1974 after a military coup by the island’s Turkish neighbors, who invaded the country. Turkey’s military invasion of Cyprus was primarily to protect the interests of the Turkish Cypriots in the island. During the conflict between Turkish and Greek Cypriots, about 80% of Greek Cypriots who left the northern part of the island were displaced, and some 60,000 Turkish Cypriots were displaced from the southern part as well. The island was partitioned by the UN and negotiations of Turkish removal of the island are unheard of at the moment.
Source
July 4th protest news.

6 Occupied nations who cannot celebrate their independence today:

1. Palestine: West Bank and Gaza have been under Israeli occupation since the Six Day War in 1967. Israel seized back Jerusalem form Jordan, and has since controlled the borders of the two disjointed territories of Palestine. Palestinians have faced extreme Israeli apartheid conditions, including restricted movement, unlawful detainment, house & town demolitions, restricted water & healthcare, terrorism by Israeli police & horrific violence.

2. Kurdistan: The Kurds are a distinct ethnic group in the Middle East. Large communities of Kurds live in eastern Turkey (Anatolia), Iran, northern Iraq, and northern Syria. This is due to the Treaty of Sèvres and partition of territories formerly ruled by the Ottoman Empire prior to WWI. There is a major discrimination against Kurds in their native regions, because they are not allowed to form any advocacy groups, political parties or any kind of representation of the Kurdish identity, not even a flag. 

3. Kabylia: Kabylia is a Berber-ethnic or Amazigh (English for “free men”) region in Northern Algeria. The Kabylia people are a distinct ethnic group from Arabs. They’re not native Arab speakers; their native language is the Kabyle language, or taqabilit. Most Kabylians loathe Pan-Arabism as they feel that it’s imposed on them by the Algerian government. French colonization of Algeria left the country in a severe identity crisis. The Algerian government is obnoxiously authoritarian and has oppressed any non-Arab movement since independence in 1962.

4. Tibet: Despite being geographically, culturally and linguistically distinct from China, Tibet is still not recognized by the People’s “Republic” of China as a separate state. During the 1960s, between 200,000 and 1,000,000 people died in Tibet under Mao Zedong’s government. Separatist movements are not allowed. Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso removed himself from heading the care-taker Tibetian government in March 14th, 2011.

5. Western Sahara: The Western Sahara is an issue in North Africa between Arab countries that share many cultural ties. It is a disputed territory between Morocco, who has claimed it since 1957 after its independence, and the armed indigenous front, Polisario, proclaiming a Sahrawi Arab Democratic state. The Western Sahara has been on the United Nations list of non-self-governing territories since 1963, but, to this day, it is still majorly controlled by Moroccan army. The Moroccan government has moved many of its citizens to the Western Sahara and blocked them from going back in attempt to claim legitimately the territory.

6. Northern Cyprus: Turkey has been occupying the Northern part of Cyprus, 36% of the region, since 1974 after a military coup by the island’s Turkish neighbors, who invaded the country. Turkey’s military invasion of Cyprus was primarily to protect the interests of the Turkish Cypriots in the island. During the conflict between Turkish and Greek Cypriots, about 80% of Greek Cypriots who left the northern part of the island were displaced, and some 60,000 Turkish Cypriots were displaced from the southern part as well. The island was partitioned by the UN and negotiations of Turkish removal of the island are unheard of at the moment.

Source

July 4th protest news.

Vietnamese protest fights back as China rivals the United States for title of meanest imperial bully. 
July 1, 2012
Hundreds of Vietnamese demonstrated in Hanoi on Sunday against China’s moves to strengthen its claim to disputed islands in the South China Sea and its invitation to oil firms to bid for blocks in offshore areas that Vietnam claims as its territory.
The authorities in Vietnam rarely allow public demonstrations and some bloggers said security forces had warned them against attending the rally, but the police made no attempt to disperse people, Nguyen Quang A, one of the protesters said.
"We want to raise people’s awareness of China’s wrongful moves recently, and we have received applause from people in the streets," he said.
The authorities tolerated a series of protests over China’s territorial claims from June to August last year before the government put an end to them.
CNOOC, the parent of New York- and Hong Kong-listed CNOOC Ltd, issued a tender last Saturday to invite foreign companies to jointly develop nine blocks in the western part of the South China Sea.
Vietnam has called this move illegal because the blocks encroach on what it claims are its territorial waters.
"The area that the China National Offshore Oil Corporation announced to open for international bidding lies entirely within Vietnam’s 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone and continental shelf in accordance with the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea," Vietnamese Foreign Ministry spokesman Luong Thanh Nghi said on June 26.
"It is absolutely not a disputed area," he said.
Source
See other news from the last week by The People’s Record.

Vietnamese protest fights back as China rivals the United States for title of meanest imperial bully.

July 1, 2012

Hundreds of Vietnamese demonstrated in Hanoi on Sunday against China’s moves to strengthen its claim to disputed islands in the South China Sea and its invitation to oil firms to bid for blocks in offshore areas that Vietnam claims as its territory.

The authorities in Vietnam rarely allow public demonstrations and some bloggers said security forces had warned them against attending the rally, but the police made no attempt to disperse people, Nguyen Quang A, one of the protesters said.

"We want to raise people’s awareness of China’s wrongful moves recently, and we have received applause from people in the streets," he said.

The authorities tolerated a series of protests over China’s territorial claims from June to August last year before the government put an end to them.

CNOOC, the parent of New York- and Hong Kong-listed CNOOC Ltd, issued a tender last Saturday to invite foreign companies to jointly develop nine blocks in the western part of the South China Sea.

Vietnam has called this move illegal because the blocks encroach on what it claims are its territorial waters.

"The area that the China National Offshore Oil Corporation announced to open for international bidding lies entirely within Vietnam’s 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone and continental shelf in accordance with the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea," Vietnamese Foreign Ministry spokesman Luong Thanh Nghi said on June 26.

"It is absolutely not a disputed area," he said.

Source

See other news from the last week by The People’s Record.

Another self immolation in China as new emerging forms and movements of resistance are gaining momentum across the globe.
July 03, 2012
An overseas rights group says a Tibetan woman was hospitalized after setting herself on fire during a land rights protest in western China.
London-based Free Tibet says Dekyi Choezom, believed to be around 40 years old, set herself on fire June 27 in Yushu, a city in Qinghai province that was badly damaged by an earthquake in 2010. The group said in an emailed statement Tuesday that she was among a group of 70 families protesting being evicted from land seized to make way for new government offices.
The case adds to about three dozen self-immolations over the past year in ethnic Tibetan areas of China in protest of what activists say is Beijing’s heavy-handed rule in the region. The government has confirmed some but not all of them.
Source

Another self immolation in China as new emerging forms and movements of resistance are gaining momentum across the globe.

July 03, 2012

An overseas rights group says a Tibetan woman was hospitalized after setting herself on fire during a land rights protest in western China.

London-based Free Tibet says Dekyi Choezom, believed to be around 40 years old, set herself on fire June 27 in Yushu, a city in Qinghai province that was badly damaged by an earthquake in 2010. The group said in an emailed statement Tuesday that she was among a group of 70 families protesting being evicted from land seized to make way for new government offices.

The case adds to about three dozen self-immolations over the past year in ethnic Tibetan areas of China in protest of what activists say is Beijing’s heavy-handed rule in the region. The government has confirmed some but not all of them.

Source

Deadly Freedom: A new generation risks it allJune 11, 2012
On March 3, 2012, 19-year-old Tsering Kyi returned to school from winter holidays, purchased a can of gas, and set herself on fire in a busy market in Machu, in the Gannan province of China. Kyi held still, fist raised, her body ablaze, for several moments before collapsing to the ground.
Kyi was raised in a nomadic Tibetan family, and attended Tibetan school in a town several miles away from where her family lived. According to news reports, she was a dedicated student, simultaneously passionate about her education, and committed to her family and religious practice.
In 2010, Kyi joined students and teachers at her school to protest new Chinese-language textbooks and the government decision to limit Tibetan-language teaching to a single class. The protests only resulted in more government control: Several of Kyi’s teachers, as well as her headmaster, were subsequently fired and replaced. Kyi is reported to have told a close relative in early January of this year that she understood the motivations behind the growing numbers of self-immolations in Tibet and China – that “no one could go on living like this.”
Full article

Deadly Freedom: A new generation risks it all
June 11, 2012

On March 3, 2012, 19-year-old Tsering Kyi returned to school from winter holidays, purchased a can of gas, and set herself on fire in a busy market in Machu, in the Gannan province of China. Kyi held still, fist raised, her body ablaze, for several moments before collapsing to the ground.

Kyi was raised in a nomadic Tibetan family, and attended Tibetan school in a town several miles away from where her family lived. According to news reports, she was a dedicated student, simultaneously passionate about her education, and committed to her family and religious practice.

In 2010, Kyi joined students and teachers at her school to protest new Chinese-language textbooks and the government decision to limit Tibetan-language teaching to a single class. The protests only resulted in more government control: Several of Kyi’s teachers, as well as her headmaster, were subsequently fired and replaced. Kyi is reported to have told a close relative in early January of this year that she understood the motivations behind the growing numbers of self-immolations in Tibet and China – that “no one could go on living like this.”

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Two Tibetan Buddhist Monks Protest China, Set Selves On Fire At Jokhang Temple In Lhasa, Tibet

May 28, 2012

Two men engulfed themselves in towering flames outside a temple that is a popular tourist site in Lhasa, marking the first time a recent wave of self-immolations to protest Chinese rule has reached the tightly guarded Tibetan capital, a U.S. broadcaster reported Monday.

Radio Free Asia said in a statement that the men were taken away by authorities within minutes of setting themselves on fire Sunday outside the Jokhang Temple.

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The Scope of the Global Spring

In December 2010, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi drenched himself in fuel in the middle of Sidi Bouzid’s town square and ignited himself on fire as a traditional form of protest. Eighteen days later, Bouazizi died and four days after that, President Zine el Abidine Ben Ali’s 23-year dictatorship crumbled. More than a year later, Bouazizi’s self-immolation has created a scourge of resistance across all corners of the world.

The people’s epoch of protest has not come easily, but no revolution ever has. Censorship, brutality, arrest and murder have greeted protesters to derail their struggle for liberation. But as last year’s Arab Spring has proved, once the oppressed have lost their fear and tolerance for tyranny, real revolution and change is possible.

An international uprising

Now that the people of the Middle East have paved the way for emancipation, the afflicted working classes across the world are stirring up mass waves of upheaval, each fighting for their own distinct struggles. So far, this Global Spring has activated thousands in nearly every country to take the streets, mobilize and launch an international revolution.

March brought the revitalization of resistance communities all over the world:

  • The Socialist Unity Centre of India has reclaimed the streets of New Delhi to rally against unemployment, lack of education opportunities and violence against women and children in India.
  • When the Indonesian government announced fuel price hikes of more than 30 percent, thousands invaded Jakarta to protest and were met with tear gas and water cannons.
  • On the six-month anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, protesters reignited the American uprising against capitalism in all areas of the country.
  • More than 200,000 Canadian students marched to protest tuition hikes in Montreal and awoke a student movement for accessible education.
  • Protesters in the Philippines have marched by the thousands to rally against the U.S. imperialist occupation of their country.
  • Portuguese protesters conducted a general strike against austerity measures after a 78-billion euro bailout last year.
  • More than 400 people gathered in Moscow after taking the streets to mobilize against state television propaganda programming condemning opposition rallies.
  • The Pakistan working class took over a petrol station to oppose power cuts in Lahore.
  • The Aysén Social Movement in Chile has made great strides against its government tormentors and has worked to provide the working class with better working conditions, healthcare, education and city infrastructure.
  • About 40 people were killed in this week alone in Syria as a continued backlash against the Arab Spring and activist groups. More than 9,000 have been killed in the year-long conflict, but protests and marches have continued.
  • Countless marches have sprung up in the United States to assemble against racism in the dozens of protests that fought for justice for murdered teenager Treyvon Martin.
  • Jamyang Palden set himself aflame in the town of Rongwo in China to protest the country’s occupation of Tibet where government officials have cut off Internet and international news access. Palden is the 27th person in the last year to self-immolate in protest.

…and this has only been in the month of March.

These are just a few of the communities of resistance that have assembled and organized against their oppressors to continue the legacy of revolution Bouazizi helped spark.

Solidarity in revolution

As the globalization of government and markets has come to be the way of the world, oppressive regimes and capitalist interests have terrorized working classes and distorted countries’ economies. But the working class is using internationalism to their benefit; one country’s struggle has become another’s struggle. This use of solidarity has acted as the fuel to enrage and motivate working class groups to begin their own emancipation. Globalization has forced us to see that revolution cannot just happen in one country; it must be an international effort to crush the oppressive forces of government control, greed, violence and war. Social justice and human rights cannot exist in one country and not in another. This conflagration of dissent is spreading purposefully and will continue a power shift from the oppressive to the oppressed.

Those maintaining the status quo are scared, too. The use of violence against protesters only demonstrates a government’s belief that uprisings can and will eventually topple them to dust. Brutality cannot and has not prevented activists all over the world from continuing their plight for basic human rights.

The Global Spring has arrived, but this is only the beginning of the emancipation of the world’s working class and oppressed.

-G. Razo