#OcupaLosPinos: Mexican protesters clash with riot police on the way to protest at President Enrique Peña Nieto’s residence

Yesterday (June 1) at the Tacubaya subway station in Mexico City, a group of police confronted about 100 protesters who were heading to occupy Los Pinos President Enrique Peña Nieto resides.

This occupation, according to local reports, was part of a civil disobedience movement formed by #MéxicoSOS in response to the last year’s presidential election. 

Mexico has seen an increase in youth uprisings with the Yo Soy 132 movement, a growing student/teacher mobilization calling for accessible education & recent protests against media giant Televisa’s corrupt political ties & negative social influence.

Photo 1, 2, 3, 4

350,000 to 500,000 people take to the streets of Dallas, Texas & demand immigration reform & a more just life in the United States
May 6, 2013

Thousands gathered Sunday in downtown Dallas to call for an immigration system overhaul as the Senate considers a proposal to legalize some of the estimated 11 million people who are in the U.S. unlawfully.

At the front of a march that began at the Cathedral Shrine of Our Virgin of Guadalupe were Catholic Bishop Kevin J. Farrell, an immigrant from Ireland, and Domingo García, a Dallas lawyer and one of the demonstration’s organizers.

“This nation was founded and built on immigrants, and we must continue to always welcome the immigrant in our midst,” Bishop Farrell said as the crowd clapped. The bishop drew more applause when he switched to Spanish and said he prayed that the nation’s leaders “accept and treat every person with justice.”

The march stretched for several blocks, bringing out families, college students and other supporters of the cause. A crowd estimate wasn’t available from police, but the turnout was a fraction of a similar march in 2006 that police said drew 350,000 to 500,000 people.

When the marchers arrived at Dallas City Hall, a Cinco de Mayo festival paused as the Pledge of Allegiance was recited and “The Star-Spangled Banner” was sung.

Dallas County Commissioner Elba García told the crowd: “We want immigration reform now. No more excuses!” Her husband, Domingo García, added, “The march is not over until President Obama signs an immigration bill.”

Angel Mondragon, an immigrant from Mexico City, carried a handmade placard that read, “Gays also want an immigration reform.” Mondragon said he loves the U.S. “I am gay and I have more opportunity here. People give me more respect here.” But the Senate measure doesn’t provide a provision that recognizes same-sex bi-national couples — a fact highlighted by various gay advocacy groups on the national level.

Some marchers and speakers noted the recent record deportations in the U.S. of about 400,000 a year. Hector Flores, a past national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, and Roberto Corona, an immigrant leader demanded that deportations should end. Through hard work within the United States, Corona said, “we have earned this immigration reform.”

Source

Chronicle of a Mexico without a presidentDecember 10, 2012
In Mexico, December 1, 2012, will be remembered as the day that an imposition was legitimized.
Enrique Peña Nieto — his name is often abbreviated in Mexico as “EPN” — took the reins of power in the context of deep indignation and amidst heavy state crackdown against crowds of protesters. A number of actions were planned in Mexico City to show the illegitimacy of Peña Nieto’s presidency, particularly given the unfair media attention he received and the electoral fraud that took place to ensure his victory.
On that day, Mexico’s historic center and the congressional buildings were a microcosm of the Mexican state as a whole. The Legislative Palace of San Lázaro, which houses Mexico’s Congress, appeared to be a giant fortress, deaf to the rubber bullets and tear gas grenades that the federal police fired at protesters. Nearby, thepresidential palace stood on one side of the Zócalo, the main square of Mexico City.
Across the street from the palace, Alameda central park had been turned into a battleground between protesters and police. The violence forced the“embroiderers for peace” — a group of artists who had gathered to display embroidered handkerchiefs that symbolized those killed or disappeared during former president Calderón’s six-year drug war — to withdraw from their peaceful protest.
Meanwhile, over televisions across the country, Mexicans participated in a society of  spectacle as they watched Peña Nieto’s inauguration. Just outside the media bubble, however, shouts of indignation rose in the streets. At a restaurant on 5 de Mayo Street, Peña Nieto’s voice declared from a television screen, “Two thousand one hundred and ninety-one days are sufficient to lay the foundation to make Mexico a prosperous country.” In the meantime, the repression continued in the historical center of the city, resulting in more than 170 arrests, and another hundred injured, many seriously. All of the violence and outcry occurred just feet from the media spectacle that protected the so-called “imposition.”
As EPN lifted his right hand and promised to protect the Constitution, the story of a Mexico without a president began. The inauguration was marked by discontent and indignation in the streets, juxtaposed against the sense of denial — “nothing to see here” — taking place in a presidential palace living in a media bubble.
“I will govern looking out for the well-being and prosperity of the union, and if I don’t accomplish it, may the nation demand it of me,” Peña Nieto declared in his inauguration speech.
This speech and the government-controlled narrative of the day’s event have been widely broadcast. But the story of the day’s protests tended to be suppressed and distorted by official propaganda.
Full article

Chronicle of a Mexico without a president
December 10, 2012

In Mexico, December 1, 2012, will be remembered as the day that an imposition was legitimized.

Enrique Peña Nieto — his name is often abbreviated in Mexico as “EPN” — took the reins of power in the context of deep indignation and amidst heavy state crackdown against crowds of protesters. A number of actions were planned in Mexico City to show the illegitimacy of Peña Nieto’s presidency, particularly given the unfair media attention he received and the electoral fraud that took place to ensure his victory.

On that day, Mexico’s historic center and the congressional buildings were a microcosm of the Mexican state as a whole. The Legislative Palace of San Lázaro, which houses Mexico’s Congress, appeared to be a giant fortress, deaf to the rubber bullets and tear gas grenades that the federal police fired at protesters. Nearby, thepresidential palace stood on one side of the Zócalo, the main square of Mexico City.

Across the street from the palace, Alameda central park had been turned into a battleground between protesters and police. The violence forced the“embroiderers for peace” — a group of artists who had gathered to display embroidered handkerchiefs that symbolized those killed or disappeared during former president Calderón’s six-year drug war — to withdraw from their peaceful protest.

Meanwhile, over televisions across the country, Mexicans participated in a society of  spectacle as they watched Peña Nieto’s inauguration. Just outside the media bubble, however, shouts of indignation rose in the streets. At a restaurant on 5 de Mayo Street, Peña Nieto’s voice declared from a television screen, “Two thousand one hundred and ninety-one days are sufficient to lay the foundation to make Mexico a prosperous country.” In the meantime, the repression continued in the historical center of the city, resulting in more than 170 arrests, and another hundred injured, many seriously. All of the violence and outcry occurred just feet from the media spectacle that protected the so-called “imposition.”

As EPN lifted his right hand and promised to protect the Constitution, the story of a Mexico without a president began. The inauguration was marked by discontent and indignation in the streets, juxtaposed against the sense of denial — “nothing to see here” — taking place in a presidential palace living in a media bubble.

“I will govern looking out for the well-being and prosperity of the union, and if I don’t accomplish it, may the nation demand it of me,” Peña Nieto declared in his inauguration speech.

This speech and the government-controlled narrative of the day’s event have been widely broadcast. But the story of the day’s protests tended to be suppressed and distorted by official propaganda.

Full article

Peña-Nieto isn’t my president: At dawn this morning, thousands marched in Mexico City in protest against the fraudulent election of Enrique Peña-Nieto, who was sworn in at midnight. Protests are expected to continue throughout the day.

Police have responded with rubber bullets and tear gas, injuring dozens; one death has been reported, but unconfirmed.

Peña-Nieto is likely to continue former president Felipe Calderon’s legacy, during whose six-year presidential term more than 120,000 Mexicans were killed, hundreds of thousands disappeared and countless others ravaged by femicide, kidnapping, extortion, prostitution & trafficking. 

As always, the mainstream media coverage of this is leaving much to be desired (if it is even covered at all); demonstrators at the heart of the protest in Mexico City have been tweeting photos & providing real-time updates via social media.

Click here for various livestream channels.

Photo 1, 2, 3, 4

Protesters blockade Mexico’s biggest TV stationJuly 27, 2012
Thousands of protesters on Thursday blockaded the studios of Mexico’s most popular TV network, accusing it of biased coverage of the July 1 presidential election.
Shouting “Tell the truth,” the demonstrators, including students and union workers, stopped employees entering the offices of the Televisa studios in Mexico City although they allowed others to leave.

The protesters allege that Televisa supported Enrique Pena Nieto, who won the election by almost 7 percentage points over leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.

The protesters promised to continue the blockade for 24 hours.

Televisa, which carried on broadcasting as normal, argues that it covered the election fairly and gave all candidates time on prime-time news shows.

Televisa is the world’s most popular Spanish language network and sells its soap operas around the globe.

Lopez Obrador has claimed that Pena Nieto paid Televisa for favorable coverage and bought votes. He has filed a legal challenge to the vote with an electoral tribunal, asking it to annul the ballot.

The tribunal has until September to rule on the accusations and officially declare Pena Nieto as president. It is widely expected to uphold the vote.
Source

Protesters blockade Mexico’s biggest TV station
July 27, 2012

Thousands of protesters on Thursday blockaded the studios of Mexico’s most popular TV network, accusing it of biased coverage of the July 1 presidential election.

Shouting “Tell the truth,” the demonstrators, including students and union workers, stopped employees entering the offices of the Televisa studios in Mexico City although they allowed others to leave.

The protesters allege that Televisa supported Enrique Pena Nieto, who won the election by almost 7 percentage points over leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.

The protesters promised to continue the blockade for 24 hours.

Televisa, which carried on broadcasting as normal, argues that it covered the election fairly and gave all candidates time on prime-time news shows.

Televisa is the world’s most popular Spanish language network and sells its soap operas around the globe.

Lopez Obrador has claimed that Pena Nieto paid Televisa for favorable coverage and bought votes. He has filed a legal challenge to the vote with an electoral tribunal, asking it to annul the ballot.

The tribunal has until September to rule on the accusations and officially declare Pena Nieto as president. It is widely expected to uphold the vote.

Source

Thousands continue to march against election fraud in MexicoJuly 22, 2012
Thousands marched through Mexico City’s center on Sunday to protest what they called the “imposition” of the candidate of the old ruling party as the country’s new president.
Protesters carried signs accusing presumed President-elect Enrique Pena Nieto of electoral fraud and Mexico television giant Televisa of being a “factory of lies.” Opponents say Pena Nieto’s party, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, won the July 1 election through vote-buying and overspending, including paying major media outlets such as Televisa for favorable coverage.
"Mexico didn’t vote for fraud. Mexico wants a country that is honest and democratic," said marcher Marlem Munoz, 26, who studies dentistry at Mexico’s National Autonomous University. "What happened in the elections was a total mockery directed at the Mexican people."
The PRI has vehemently denied the charges and on Friday accused losing leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of trying to “disqualify the entire electoral process with lies.” Televisa also has denied charges of being paid for positive coverage.
Mexico City authorities did not immediately release an official crowd estimate, but the march appeared to draw far fewer people than similar protests before the election with as many as 90,000 participants. A July 7 march, the first after election, drew 50,000. The events have attracted people from a new student movement, “I Am 132,” and leftist groups supporting Lopez Obrador.
Source

Thousands continue to march against election fraud in Mexico
July 22, 2012

Thousands marched through Mexico City’s center on Sunday to protest what they called the “imposition” of the candidate of the old ruling party as the country’s new president.

Protesters carried signs accusing presumed President-elect Enrique Pena Nieto of electoral fraud and Mexico television giant Televisa of being a “factory of lies.” Opponents say Pena Nieto’s party, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, won the July 1 election through vote-buying and overspending, including paying major media outlets such as Televisa for favorable coverage.

"Mexico didn’t vote for fraud. Mexico wants a country that is honest and democratic," said marcher Marlem Munoz, 26, who studies dentistry at Mexico’s National Autonomous University. "What happened in the elections was a total mockery directed at the Mexican people."

The PRI has vehemently denied the charges and on Friday accused losing leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of trying to “disqualify the entire electoral process with lies.” Televisa also has denied charges of being paid for positive coverage.

Mexico City authorities did not immediately release an official crowd estimate, but the march appeared to draw far fewer people than similar protests before the election with as many as 90,000 participants. A July 7 march, the first after election, drew 50,000. The events have attracted people from a new student movement, “I Am 132,” and leftist groups supporting Lopez Obrador.

Source

frijoliz
thinkmexican:

In the Spirit of Cuauhtemoc
Thousands of students and young people took to the streets this past Wednesday in Tijuana in protest of widely documented electoral fraud in Mexico’s presidential election. The march ended at the Monument to Cuauhtemoc (seen above).
Cuauhtemoc, the Tlatoani, literally meaning “Speaker,” of Mexico Tenochtitlan at the time of the Spanish Invasion between 1520 to 1521. Known as the “Young Elder,” Cuauhtemoc remains one of Mexico’s most patriotic symbols.
July 4, 2012Alfredo Ornelas CUT Universidad de Tijuana

& the Global Awakening continues.

thinkmexican:

In the Spirit of Cuauhtemoc

Thousands of students and young people took to the streets this past Wednesday in Tijuana in protest of widely documented electoral fraud in Mexico’s presidential election. The march ended at the Monument to Cuauhtemoc (seen above).

Cuauhtemoc, the Tlatoani, literally meaning “Speaker,” of Mexico Tenochtitlan at the time of the Spanish Invasion between 1520 to 1521. Known as the “Young Elder,” Cuauhtemoc remains one of Mexico’s most patriotic symbols.

July 4, 2012
Alfredo Ornelas
CUT Universidad de Tijuana

& the Global Awakening continues.

Thousands protest Mexico’s president-electJuly 7, 2012 
Tens of thousands of demonstrators marched through Mexico City Saturday against the presidential election win of Enrique Pena Nieto, accusing him and his party of widespread vote-buying.
The marchers claim Pena Nieto, from the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), “bought” his way to victory by handing out gift cards and securing paid favorable media coverage from the country’s two main TV networks.
"Out Pena, Mexico without the PRI!" the protesters chanted as the massive crowd made its way down the Paseo de la Reforma — a main thoroughfare in the capital — to the Zocalo, the city’s giant downtown square.
Mexico’s independent election authority on Friday ratified Pena Nieto’s victory in the July 1 vote, saying he bested his nearest opponent, leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, by more than six percentage points.
But many in this country of 112 million have refused to accept Pena Nieto’s victory, which marks the return to power of the PRI — the party that ruled for seven decades until 2000, amid accusations of rigged elections and repression.
"We would look really bad if Pena Nieto would take office and we did nothing," said Mara Soto, a 21 year-old student at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).
Source

Thousands protest Mexico’s president-elect
July 7, 2012 

Tens of thousands of demonstrators marched through Mexico City Saturday against the presidential election win of Enrique Pena Nieto, accusing him and his party of widespread vote-buying.

The marchers claim Pena Nieto, from the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), “bought” his way to victory by handing out gift cards and securing paid favorable media coverage from the country’s two main TV networks.

"Out Pena, Mexico without the PRI!" the protesters chanted as the massive crowd made its way down the Paseo de la Reforma — a main thoroughfare in the capital — to the Zocalo, the city’s giant downtown square.

Mexico’s independent election authority on Friday ratified Pena Nieto’s victory in the July 1 vote, saying he bested his nearest opponent, leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, by more than six percentage points.

But many in this country of 112 million have refused to accept Pena Nieto’s victory, which marks the return to power of the PRI — the party that ruled for seven decades until 2000, amid accusations of rigged elections and repression.

"We would look really bad if Pena Nieto would take office and we did nothing," said Mara Soto, a 21 year-old student at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).

Source

Students from the Iberoamerican University chant a school cheer during a protest last weekend in Mexico City. The demonstrators have added fuel to the political frenzy leading up to Mexico’s elections on Sunday, July 1.
Mass protests have become increasingly common in Mexico as students become disenfranchised by corrupt government practices, are left with little educational opportunities & burdened by a high youth unemployment rate. (photo)

Students from the Iberoamerican University chant a school cheer during a protest last weekend in Mexico City. The demonstrators have added fuel to the political frenzy leading up to Mexico’s elections on Sunday, July 1.

Mass protests have become increasingly common in Mexico as students become disenfranchised by corrupt government practices, are left with little educational opportunities & burdened by a high youth unemployment rate. (photo)

A student upsurge in MexicoJune 14, 2012
An unexpected wave of protests led by university students has broken out in cities across Mexico, centered on the media’s promotion of presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the party that ruled Mexico for 70 years until 2000.
Students from different social backgrounds, and from both public and private universities have for the first time formed a united front in leading a nonviolent struggle of conscience against mainstream media conglomerates Televisa, TV Azteca, Milenio and Radio Formula, including their anchors, broadcasters and journalists. But the protests’ main focus on the media’s telegenic chosen candidate, Peña Nieto.
Anti-Peña Nieto sentiment publicly began to make headlines at the Universidad Iberoamericana on May 11, when the visiting candidate was loudly and embarrassingly mocked by students.
The candidate’s visit to the campus was previously canceled on two occasions—apparently out of fear that he would stumble, as he had at the International Book Fair in Guadalajara last December, when he was unable to remember the authors of books that had been important to his life.
Once he arrived on campus in May, Peña Nieto was forced to leave through the back door as students ran him off the premises chanting: “Out ignorant, out Peña Nieto, the Ibero doesn’t want you!” In a university that mostly caters to the upper middle class and wealthy, the protest was another unexpected blow to the PRI candidate’s already flawed reputation.
With the help of a friendly media, Peña Nieto and the PRI immediately retaliated in accusing Josephina Vasquez Mota of the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and center-left candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the Progressive Front of jointly conspiring against him by accusing the two of fomenting intolerance.
When the media echoed those claims, 131 students who had participated in the protest posted a video in which they showed their student IDs. This led to the launch of a Twitter feed, #YoSoy132—I am 132.
Source

A student upsurge in Mexico
June 14, 2012

An unexpected wave of protests led by university students has broken out in cities across Mexico, centered on the media’s promotion of presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the party that ruled Mexico for 70 years until 2000.

Students from different social backgrounds, and from both public and private universities have for the first time formed a united front in leading a nonviolent struggle of conscience against mainstream media conglomerates Televisa, TV Azteca, Milenio and Radio Formula, including their anchors, broadcasters and journalists. But the protests’ main focus on the media’s telegenic chosen candidate, Peña Nieto.

Anti-Peña Nieto sentiment publicly began to make headlines at the Universidad Iberoamericana on May 11, when the visiting candidate was loudly and embarrassingly mocked by students.

The candidate’s visit to the campus was previously canceled on two occasions—apparently out of fear that he would stumble, as he had at the International Book Fair in Guadalajara last December, when he was unable to remember the authors of books that had been important to his life.

Once he arrived on campus in May, Peña Nieto was forced to leave through the back door as students ran him off the premises chanting: “Out ignorant, out Peña Nieto, the Ibero doesn’t want you!” In a university that mostly caters to the upper middle class and wealthy, the protest was another unexpected blow to the PRI candidate’s already flawed reputation.

With the help of a friendly media, Peña Nieto and the PRI immediately retaliated in accusing Josephina Vasquez Mota of the right-wing National Action Party (PAN) and center-left candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the Progressive Front of jointly conspiring against him by accusing the two of fomenting intolerance.

When the media echoed those claims, 131 students who had participated in the protest posted a video in which they showed their student IDs. This led to the launch of a Twitter feed, #YoSoy132—I am 132.

Source

Must Watch: The rising Mexican student movement, known as Yo Soy 132, explains its struggle for a fair, transparent media, democratic elections, access to education, freedom of press & for the mass murders across Mexico to come to an end immediately.

"Today the youth of Mexico have ignited a torch in the public life of the country. Let us take on this historic moment with bravery, responsibility & integrity.

Let us not wait any longer; let us not keep quiet any longer. Let us unite & get organized.”

Police military backlash is beginning as the Mexican Student Movement, known as Yo Soy #132, gains momentum. (photo source)
The movement is centered around a censored, biased media & a corrupt political system, especially as national elections are coming up. 
“Our main goal is to seek greater democracy within Mexican media,” said fellow activist, Rodrigo Serrano.
The name, “YoSoy132” alludes to a group of students from the Universidad Iberamericana, who heckled PRI presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto during a recent visit to the university that chased him off the premises.
After the incident, PRI leaders accused the Iberoamericana students of being intolerant, inconsiderate “stooges” paid to protest against Peña Nieto by the leftist PRD party. 
Source

Police military backlash is beginning as the Mexican Student Movement, known as Yo Soy #132, gains momentum. (photo source)

The movement is centered around a censored, biased media & a corrupt political system, especially as national elections are coming up. 

“Our main goal is to seek greater democracy within Mexican media,” said fellow activist, Rodrigo Serrano.

The name, “YoSoy132” alludes to a group of students from the Universidad Iberamericana, who heckled PRI presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto during a recent visit to the university that chased him off the premises.

After the incident, PRI leaders accused the Iberoamericana students of being intolerant, inconsiderate “stooges” paid to protest against Peña Nieto by the leftist PRD party. 

Source