French students barricade high school to protest deportation of classmatesOctober 21, 2013
Thousands of French high school students have launched protests across Paris, building barricades to block their own schools’ entrances, to show their opposition to aggressive government deportations of their classmates.
The uprisings were touched off by what many are calling the “inhumane” expulsion of a 15-year-old Kosovan Roma student Leonarda Dibrani, who was arrested in front of her fellow pupils while she was on a school field trip earlier this month after her family was denied asylum. She, her five siblings, and her parents were subsequently deported to Kosovo.
Protests swept more than 30 schools in Paris and the suburbs on Thursday, according to the high school student union the UNL, with the Paris education authority reporting 14 schools were “disrupted.”
Students blocked entrances to several schools with barricades and protests. The Guardian reports, “At one high school in Paris students piled green garbage cans in front of the entrance and hung a banner saying ‘Education in danger.’” A mass protest took place at Paris’s Place de la Nation, France 24 reports.
Some reports have emerged of clashes between protesters and police—who wielded batons and fired teargas.
"Everybody should have a chance. Everybody should have a job, work and have a family. When children try to achieve that, France refuses, and that is not my country," said protester Romain Desprez in an interview with the Guardian.
“Everyone has the right to an education,” Steven Nassiri, spokesman of the FIDL high school union, told AFP, explaining that protesters were demanding the return of students who had been deported from France.
Deportations like Dibrani’s are commonplace in a country known for its harsh immigration laws targeting its many migrant communities. France’s Interior Minister Manuel Valls sparked public outrage last month when he declared that a vast majority of the country’s 20,000 Roma residents should be deported.
"My home is in France," Dibrani declared in French when interviewed from the Kosovo city of Mitrovica where she was deported, the Guardian reports. “I don’t speak the language here [in Kosovo] and I don’t know anyone. I just want to go back to France and forget everything that happened.”
Source

French students barricade high school to protest deportation of classmates
October 21, 2013

Thousands of French high school students have launched protests across Paris, building barricades to block their own schools’ entrances, to show their opposition to aggressive government deportations of their classmates.

The uprisings were touched off by what many are calling the “inhumane” expulsion of a 15-year-old Kosovan Roma student Leonarda Dibrani, who was arrested in front of her fellow pupils while she was on a school field trip earlier this month after her family was denied asylum. She, her five siblings, and her parents were subsequently deported to Kosovo.

Protests swept more than 30 schools in Paris and the suburbs on Thursday, according to the high school student union the UNL, with the Paris education authority reporting 14 schools were “disrupted.”

Students blocked entrances to several schools with barricades and protests. The Guardian reports, “At one high school in Paris students piled green garbage cans in front of the entrance and hung a banner saying ‘Education in danger.’” A mass protest took place at Paris’s Place de la Nation, France 24 reports.

Some reports have emerged of clashes between protesters and police—who wielded batons and fired teargas.

"Everybody should have a chance. Everybody should have a job, work and have a family. When children try to achieve that, France refuses, and that is not my country," said protester Romain Desprez in an interview with the Guardian.

“Everyone has the right to an education,” Steven Nassiri, spokesman of the FIDL high school union, told AFP, explaining that protesters were demanding the return of students who had been deported from France.

Deportations like Dibrani’s are commonplace in a country known for its harsh immigration laws targeting its many migrant communities. France’s Interior Minister Manuel Valls sparked public outrage last month when he declared that a vast majority of the country’s 20,000 Roma residents should be deported.

"My home is in France," Dibrani declared in French when interviewed from the Kosovo city of Mitrovica where she was deported, the Guardian reports. “I don’t speak the language here [in Kosovo] and I don’t know anyone. I just want to go back to France and forget everything that happened.”

Source

Revelations on the French Big BrotherJuly 4, 2013
If the revelations about the American espionage program Prism set off a chorus of indignation in Europe, France itself protested only weakly. For two excellent reasons: Paris already knew about it – and it”s doing exactly the same thing. Le Monde is able to disclose that the General Directorate of External Security (the DGSE, or special services) systematically collects the electromagnetic signals emitted by computers and telephones in France, and the flow of signals between France and countries abroad: the entirety of our communications are being spied on. All of our email messages, SMS messages, itemised phone bills and connections to FaceBook and Twitter are then stored for years.
If this immense data base was used just by the DGSE, which operates only outside French borders, it would already be illegal. But the six other intelligence services – among them the Central Directorate of Internal Intelligence, the customs service and the Tracfin anti-money-laundering service – delve into this base daily for the data of interest to them. This takes place discreetly, on the margins of legality and and beyond any serious control. Politicians are perfectly aware of it, but secrecy is the rule.
A Clandestine System
This French Big Brother, a little brother of the American services, is clandestine. Yet its existence appears discreetly in parliamentary documents. In a report issued on April 30, the eight deputies and senators in the parliamentary intelligence delegation note that ”progress has been made since 2008 in the mutualisation of capabilities, notably regarding intelligence of electromagnetic origin, effected by the DGSE for the benefit of the entire intelligence community.”
The parliamentarians propose to go still further, to "reinforce the capabilities exploited by the DGSE" and to "consolidate the access of other services to the capabilities mutualised by the DGSE."
The Target: “Metadata”
The intelligence services are not looking for the content of the messages, but rather their context. It is more interesting to know who is speaking to whom than to record what they are saying. More than phone tapping, it”s the technical data – the “metadata” – that is being combed through.
The DGSE thus collects the itemised telephone bills of millions of subscribers – the names of the callers and the called, the place, the date, the duration, the weight of the message. The same goes for email (with the possibility of reading the title of the message), SMS messages, faxes… And all activity on the Internet that takes place via Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo… It’s what the parliamentary intelligence delegation very aptly calls “intelligence of electromagnetic origin”, the equivalent of the NSA’s SigInt (signals intelligence).
This metadata may be used to draw huge graphs of links among people based on their digital activity, and it’s been going on for years. The idea is to sketch out a kind of diary of each person’s activity on both telephone and computer. When an interesting group has been identified, it then becomes the responsibility of the intelligence services to use more intrusive techniques, like wire-tapping or policetails.
A Supercomputer on Boulevard Mortier in Paris
This system is obviously of great value in the fight against terrorism. But it allows spying on anyone, any time. The DGSE collects billions of billions of units of data, which are compressed and stored on three floors in the basement of the DGSE headquarters on Boulevard Mortier in Paris.
Bernard Barbier, technical director of the DGSE since 2006, has spoken publicly about this system on two occasions – in 2010 at a symposium on the security of information and communications technology, and to the Association of Reservists in Encryption and Information Security (Arsci). His comments were reported on a few specialised sites, including Bug Brother, a blog by Jean-Marc Manach on lemonde.fr. Mr. Barbier spoke of "the development of a calculator based on FPGA"– Field Programmable Gate Array, or an integrated circuit that may be programmed for logical functions – that is "probably the biggest data processing center in Europe after the English", capable of managing dozens of petaoctets of data, in other words dozens of millions of gigaoctets. The heat emitted by the computers is sufficient to heat all the buildings of the DGSE…
France is said to be among the Top 5 in computing capacity, after the United States, Britain, Israel and China. Mr. Barbier estimated the number of connections picked up by the system at 4 billion in 2013, with a flow of about 1 billion simultaneous communications. "Today, our targets are the networks of the public at large," the director said at the time, "because they are used by terrorists."
The DGSE heads ”the strongest team of crypto-mathematicians” in France, penetrates computer systems – and of course collects millions of units of personal data.
"Mutualised" Intelligence
The other French intelligence services have access to this gigantic data base, which is soberly called the "mutualisation infrastructure". They include the DGSE of course, but also the Directorate of Military Intelligence (DRM); the Directorate of Protection and Security of Defense (DPSD); the Central Directorate of Internal Security (DCRI); the Directorate of National Intelligence and Customs Investigations (DNRED); Tracfin, the anti-money-laundering unit; and even the small intelligence service of the police headquarters in Paris.
According to Senate reports, 80% of the resources of the technical management of the DGSE are used by these other intelligence services. Each supplies the name of the target of their investigation to the DGSE, which replies “hit” or “no hit” according to whether the target appears in the data base or not. Then the services of the DGSE make the metadata intelligible with the addition of classical intelligence.
Requests for consultation go far beyond just terrorism and the defence of France’s economic property. The very vague wording – protection of national security – makes it possible notably to identify the entourage of politicians at the highest level of the state, whatever their position and the nature of the links under surveillance.
Absence of Monitoring
The system is perfectly illegal – or “a-legal”, as the chief of one of the intelligence agencies puts it. According to the National Commission for Information Technology and Freedom (CNIL), the French agency in charge of protecting personal data, "The legal system governing security interceptions forbids the establishment by the intelligence services of a procedure like Prism." It adds :"Each request for the requisition or interception of data must be targeted and may not be carried out massively in terms of the quantity or the time period. Such practices thus have no legal foundation." The CNIL can neither confirm or deny the existence of the French system – it moveover does not have access to the files of the DGSE or the DCRI.
To be sure, there is a strict legal framework for security interceptions, which are to be authorised by the prime minister, on the recommendation of the National Consultative Commission for Security Interceptions, but this framework did not forecess the massive stocking of technical data by the secret services. "We’ve been operating is a zone of virtual autorisation for years", confided a former chief of one of the services. "And each agency is quite content with this freedom, which is possible thanks to the legal vagueness surrounding metadata." A parliamentarian confirmed that "a large portion of the electronic connections in France are effectively intercepted and stocked by the DGSE." But, officially, the"mutualisation infrastructure" does not exist.
Source
Submitted by dashielsheen.

Revelations on the French Big Brother
July 4, 2013

If the revelations about the American espionage program Prism set off a chorus of indignation in Europe, France itself protested only weakly. For two excellent reasons: Paris already knew about it – and it”s doing exactly the same thing. Le Monde is able to disclose that the General Directorate of External Security (the DGSE, or special services) systematically collects the electromagnetic signals emitted by computers and telephones in France, and the flow of signals between France and countries abroad: the entirety of our communications are being spied on. All of our email messages, SMS messages, itemised phone bills and connections to FaceBook and Twitter are then stored for years.

If this immense data base was used just by the DGSE, which operates only outside French borders, it would already be illegal. But the six other intelligence services – among them the Central Directorate of Internal Intelligence, the customs service and the Tracfin anti-money-laundering service – delve into this base daily for the data of interest to them. This takes place discreetly, on the margins of legality and and beyond any serious control. Politicians are perfectly aware of it, but secrecy is the rule.

A Clandestine System

This French Big Brother, a little brother of the American services, is clandestine. Yet its existence appears discreetly in parliamentary documents. In a report issued on April 30, the eight deputies and senators in the parliamentary intelligence delegation note that ”progress has been made since 2008 in the mutualisation of capabilities, notably regarding intelligence of electromagnetic origin, effected by the DGSE for the benefit of the entire intelligence community.”

The parliamentarians propose to go still further, to "reinforce the capabilities exploited by the DGSE" and to "consolidate the access of other services to the capabilities mutualised by the DGSE."

The Target: “Metadata”

The intelligence services are not looking for the content of the messages, but rather their context. It is more interesting to know who is speaking to whom than to record what they are saying. More than phone tapping, it”s the technical data – the “metadata” – that is being combed through.

The DGSE thus collects the itemised telephone bills of millions of subscribers – the names of the callers and the called, the place, the date, the duration, the weight of the message. The same goes for email (with the possibility of reading the title of the message), SMS messages, faxes… And all activity on the Internet that takes place via Google, Facebook, MicrosoftApple, Yahoo… It’s what the parliamentary intelligence delegation very aptly calls “intelligence of electromagnetic origin”, the equivalent of the NSA’s SigInt (signals intelligence).

This metadata may be used to draw huge graphs of links among people based on their digital activity, and it’s been going on for years. The idea is to sketch out a kind of diary of each person’s activity on both telephone and computer. When an interesting group has been identified, it then becomes the responsibility of the intelligence services to use more intrusive techniques, like wire-tapping or policetails.

A Supercomputer on Boulevard Mortier in Paris

This system is obviously of great value in the fight against terrorism. But it allows spying on anyone, any time. The DGSE collects billions of billions of units of data, which are compressed and stored on three floors in the basement of the DGSE headquarters on Boulevard Mortier in Paris.

Bernard Barbier, technical director of the DGSE since 2006, has spoken publicly about this system on two occasions – in 2010 at a symposium on the security of information and communications technology, and to the Association of Reservists in Encryption and Information Security (Arsci). His comments were reported on a few specialised sites, including Bug Brother, a blog by Jean-Marc Manach on lemonde.fr. Mr. Barbier spoke of "the development of a calculator based on FPGA"– Field Programmable Gate Array, or an integrated circuit that may be programmed for logical functions – that is "probably the biggest data processing center in Europe after the English", capable of managing dozens of petaoctets of data, in other words dozens of millions of gigaoctets. The heat emitted by the computers is sufficient to heat all the buildings of the DGSE…

France is said to be among the Top 5 in computing capacity, after the United States, Britain, Israel and China. Mr. Barbier estimated the number of connections picked up by the system at 4 billion in 2013, with a flow of about 1 billion simultaneous communications. "Today, our targets are the networks of the public at large," the director said at the time, "because they are used by terrorists."

The DGSE heads ”the strongest team of crypto-mathematicians” in France, penetrates computer systems – and of course collects millions of units of personal data.

"Mutualised" Intelligence

The other French intelligence services have access to this gigantic data base, which is soberly called the "mutualisation infrastructure". They include the DGSE of course, but also the Directorate of Military Intelligence (DRM); the Directorate of Protection and Security of Defense (DPSD); the Central Directorate of Internal Security (DCRI); the Directorate of National Intelligence and Customs Investigations (DNRED); Tracfin, the anti-money-laundering unit; and even the small intelligence service of the police headquarters in Paris.

According to Senate reports, 80% of the resources of the technical management of the DGSE are used by these other intelligence services. Each supplies the name of the target of their investigation to the DGSE, which replies “hit” or “no hit” according to whether the target appears in the data base or not. Then the services of the DGSE make the metadata intelligible with the addition of classical intelligence.

Requests for consultation go far beyond just terrorism and the defence of France’s economic property. The very vague wording – protection of national security – makes it possible notably to identify the entourage of politicians at the highest level of the state, whatever their position and the nature of the links under surveillance.

Absence of Monitoring

The system is perfectly illegal – or “a-legal”, as the chief of one of the intelligence agencies puts it. According to the National Commission for Information Technology and Freedom (CNIL), the French agency in charge of protecting personal data, "The legal system governing security interceptions forbids the establishment by the intelligence services of a procedure like Prism." It adds :"Each request for the requisition or interception of data must be targeted and may not be carried out massively in terms of the quantity or the time period. Such practices thus have no legal foundation." The CNIL can neither confirm or deny the existence of the French system – it moveover does not have access to the files of the DGSE or the DCRI.

To be sure, there is a strict legal framework for security interceptions, which are to be authorised by the prime minister, on the recommendation of the National Consultative Commission for Security Interceptions, but this framework did not forecess the massive stocking of technical data by the secret services. "We’ve been operating is a zone of virtual autorisation for years", confided a former chief of one of the services. "And each agency is quite content with this freedom, which is possible thanks to the legal vagueness surrounding metadata." A parliamentarian confirmed that "a large portion of the electronic connections in France are effectively intercepted and stocked by the DGSE." But, officially, the"mutualisation infrastructure" does not exist.

Source

Submitted by dashielsheen.

The French left hold socialist President Hollande accountable, march through Paris to protest his selling out & becoming an austerity puppet for capitalists Brussels & Berlin
May 6, 2013

At least tens of thousands of far-left protesters have marched through Paris, to vent their anger over economic austerity. Sunday’s demonstration came on the eve of the first anniversary of Francois Hollande’s election as French President.

The crowd were fired up by far-left leader Jean-Luc Melenchon. “We don’t want the financial sector in power,” he told the crowds.“We do not accept austerity policies that usher in endless suffering for our people, like all others in Europe.”

The protest highlighted fierce opposition on the left to the Socialist president’s market-friendly reforms.- and the loosening of labor rules which makes hiring and firing slightly easier.

“A number of economists, whose thoughts are well regarded, have recently said that this policy of austerity is driving us into the wall. The people of the world are getting poorer and poorer,” said one demonstrator.

France is on the edge of recession and unemployment is at an all time high. Hollande has suffered the sharpest fall in popularity of any president in more than half a century.

Source

The protesters held brooms to symbolize the need to clean the government of it’s dependence on the capitalist financial sector.

The film TOGETHER available to watch free online!

October 29, 2012

The documentary “TOGETHER -  how cooperatives show resilience to the crisis” is officially launched and you can watch the full version in English and French here!

The film shows the resilience of cooperatives to the crisis through testimonies of staff of four European cooperative stories located in France, Poland, Italy and SpainCECOP-CECOP Europe is producing also both Italian and Spanish versions that will be available by the end of October.

The examples filmed include a mineral water factory in Poland founded more than 60 years ago (Muszynianka), a French company in crisis acquired by its workers and transformed into a worker cooperative (Fonderie de l’Aisne), a consortium of social cooperatives in Milan providing labor inclusion to disadvantaged people and social services to thousands of citizens (Consorzio SIS) and an industrial cooperative group which is one of Spain’s largest business groups (MONDRAGON Corporation). 

Source

For more about the growing movement to build cooperatives to confront capitalism in crisis, read our write up about Red Emma’s in Baltimore and our write up about Democracy at Work based out of New York

80,000 Parisians rally over austerity measuresSeptember 30, 2012
Thousands of people have taken to the streets in the French capital Paris to express their outrage at the European Union’s fiscal pact and government’s plans for further spending cuts.
More than 80,000 protesters marched through central Paris on Sunday, chanting slogans against imposed austerity and belt-tightening policies. The demonstration comes before the French parliament’s debate this week on a European fiscal treaty. The treaty will help the establishment of European Stability Mechanism bailout fund. European leaders expect the fund to appease the on-going Eurozone sovereign debt crisis, which has shaken financial markets both within and outside the monetary union.
France’s main conservative opposition party and most Socialist lawmakers support the treaty. Far-left parties, the Greens and some dissident Socialists, however, oppose it. Socialist President Francois Hollande — who was elected in the spring — suffers a great deal of political pressure and his popularity has been declining according to recent surveys.
Source

80,000 Parisians rally over austerity measures
September 30, 2012

Thousands of people have taken to the streets in the French capital Paris to express their outrage at the European Union’s fiscal pact and government’s plans for further spending cuts.

More than 80,000 protesters marched through central Paris on Sunday, chanting slogans against imposed austerity and belt-tightening policies. 

The demonstration comes before the French parliament’s debate this week on a European fiscal treaty. 

The treaty will help the establishment of European Stability Mechanism bailout fund. 

European leaders expect the fund to appease the on-going Eurozone sovereign debt crisis, which has shaken financial markets both within and outside the monetary union.

France’s main conservative opposition party and most Socialist lawmakers support the treaty. Far-left parties, the Greens and some dissident Socialists, however, oppose it. 

Socialist President Francois Hollande — who was elected in the spring — suffers a great deal of political pressure and his popularity has been declining according to recent surveys.

Source

An investigation into the potential poisoning of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat may become reality
September 5, 2012
Palestinians on Wednesday welcomed news that a delegation of French judges investigating suspicions that Yasser Arafat was poisoned may travel to the West Bank.
"We welcome the visit of the French committee that was formed to look into the late president Arafat’s death," a statement from Tawfiq Tirawi, head of the Palestinian committee investigating the circumstances of the veteran leader’s death in November 2004, said.
His remarks came just hours after Arafat’s widow Suha said three investigative magistrates were making plans to travel to Ramallah following claims the late leader may have succumbed to poisoning by the radioactive substance polonium.
No date has been given for the trip which would involve forensic officers exhuming the body and taking samples for laboratory testing, she said in a statement released by her lawyer.
Source

An investigation into the potential poisoning of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat may become reality

September 5, 2012

Palestinians on Wednesday welcomed news that a delegation of French judges investigating suspicions that Yasser Arafat was poisoned may travel to the West Bank.

"We welcome the visit of the French committee that was formed to look into the late president Arafat’s death," a statement from Tawfiq Tirawi, head of the Palestinian committee investigating the circumstances of the veteran leader’s death in November 2004, said.

His remarks came just hours after Arafat’s widow Suha said three investigative magistrates were making plans to travel to Ramallah following claims the late leader may have succumbed to poisoning by the radioactive substance polonium.

No date has been given for the trip which would involve forensic officers exhuming the body and taking samples for laboratory testing, she said in a statement released by her lawyer.

Source

Anonymous attacks shirt chain over  trademark claim
August 5, 2012
A French T-shirt maker said on Saturday he would relinquish his claim to the trademark of the Anonymous logo and slogan after the international hacking group attacked his online business.
Apollinaire Auffret, who manages the Early Flicker T-shirt firm, drew the ire of Anonymous after he filed a trademark claim with France’s National Institute of Industrial Property to use the notorious group’s visual tags in various forms, including on clothing, bags or dishes.
The Anonymous logo features a suited figure with a question mark instead of a head.
Though the application was filed 16 February, it was only made public this week in a story in the Parisien newspaper.
Immediately after, Anonymous posted a grainy video on YouTube in which a synthesised voice says Anonymous will attack Early Flicker’s online presence.
"Their arrogance and ignorance of what they have done will not go unpunished," intones the voice, as a masked person holds a statement. "Anonymous will take down any business they have going on the internet."
Auffret told AFP on Saturday that he had been in contact with someone from Anonymous and resolved the dispute by pledging to relinquish his claim to the logo and slogan.
Source
Anonymous is the last group on earth I would try to exploit for profit. Seriously.

Anonymous attacks shirt chain over trademark claim

August 5, 2012

A French T-shirt maker said on Saturday he would relinquish his claim to the trademark of the Anonymous logo and slogan after the international hacking group attacked his online business.

Apollinaire Auffret, who manages the Early Flicker T-shirt firm, drew the ire of Anonymous after he filed a trademark claim with France’s National Institute of Industrial Property to use the notorious group’s visual tags in various forms, including on clothing, bags or dishes.

The Anonymous logo features a suited figure with a question mark instead of a head.

Though the application was filed 16 February, it was only made public this week in a story in the Parisien newspaper.

Immediately after, Anonymous posted a grainy video on YouTube in which a synthesised voice says Anonymous will attack Early Flicker’s online presence.

"Their arrogance and ignorance of what they have done will not go unpunished," intones the voice, as a masked person holds a statement. "Anonymous will take down any business they have going on the internet."

Auffret told AFP on Saturday that he had been in contact with someone from Anonymous and resolved the dispute by pledging to relinquish his claim to the logo and slogan.

Source

Anonymous is the last group on earth I would try to exploit for profit. Seriously.

French Parliamentary Elections Go to Hollande’s Socialists
June 17, 2012
French President Francois Hollande’s Socialists won an absolute parliamentary majority on Sunday, strengthening his hand as he presses Germany to support debt-laden euro zone states hit by austerity cuts and ailing banks.
The Socialist bloc secured between 296 and 320 seats in the parliamentary election runoff, according to reliable projections from a partial vote count, comfortably more than the 289 needed for a majority in the 577-seat National Assembly.
The result means Hollande won’t need to rely on the environmentalist Greens, projected to win 20 seats, or the Communist-dominated Left Front, likely to have just 10 deputies, to pass laws. The centre-left already controls the upper house of parliament, the Senate.
Source
Follow thepeoplesrecord.com for more news on June 17, 2012 for election results in important elections today in Greece, France and Egypt.

French Parliamentary Elections Go to Hollande’s Socialists

June 17, 2012

French President Francois Hollande’s Socialists won an absolute parliamentary majority on Sunday, strengthening his hand as he presses Germany to support debt-laden euro zone states hit by austerity cuts and ailing banks.

The Socialist bloc secured between 296 and 320 seats in the parliamentary election runoff, according to reliable projections from a partial vote count, comfortably more than the 289 needed for a majority in the 577-seat National Assembly.

The result means Hollande won’t need to rely on the environmentalist Greens, projected to win 20 seats, or the Communist-dominated Left Front, likely to have just 10 deputies, to pass laws. The centre-left already controls the upper house of parliament, the Senate.

Source

Follow thepeoplesrecord.com for more news on June 17, 2012 for election results in important elections today in Greece, France and Egypt.

THEPEOPLESRECORD.COM GREECE ELECTION UPDATE

June 17, 2012

30% of the vote counted. New Democracy - 30.61%, SYRIZA - 25.83%. Clear results won’t be for another 3 hours, estimated, but as urban areas start reporting in greater numbers, SYRIZA will close that gap.

Follow thepeoplesrecord.com  today for live election results in important elections in Greece, Egypt and France!

Source

Op-Ed: WikiLeaks exposes corruption as France bans Monsanto’s GMO maize
Article originally posted June 04, 2012
Coming soon after France bans GMO maize, WikiLeaks cables expose details of ‘military-style trade wars’ against countries who reject Monsanto GMOs.France banned the Monsanto MON 810 “Yieldgard” maize due to environmental and health concerns. And now the European Union is stepping in to re-secure Monsanto’s presence in that country, against the will of the nation itself. Back in 2007, the U.S. ambassador to France, Craig Stapleton, who is a business partner of George W. Bush, stated that nationals who do not accept Monsanto’s GMO crops will be “penalized”. He stated that the nations should be threatened with “military-styled trade wars”. So it is no surprise that the move to maintain Monsanto’s grip on France is all about the fact that the U.S. and other nations are continually pushing Monsanto’s agenda. Monsanto has major (and most likely financial) connections with political heads that have actually threatened to use these trade wars. In January, WikiLeaks cables came to light revealing the information concerning the deep involvement of Monsanto in political circles. In this cable, is a statement made by Craig Stapleton:“Country team Paris recommends that we calibrate a target retaliation list that causes some pain across the EU since this is a collective responsibility, but that also focuses in part on the worst culprits. The list should be measured rather than vicious and must be sustainable over the long term, since we should not expect an early victory. Moving to retaliation will make clear that the current path has real costs to EU interests and could help strengthen European pro-biotech voices.”

Op-Ed: WikiLeaks exposes corruption as France bans Monsanto’s GMO maize

Article originally posted June 04, 2012


Coming soon after France bans GMO maize, WikiLeaks cables expose details of ‘military-style trade wars’ against countries who reject Monsanto GMOs.

France banned the Monsanto MON 810 “Yieldgard” maize due to environmental and health concerns. And now the European Union is stepping in to re-secure Monsanto’s presence in that country, against the will of the nation itself. Back in 2007, the U.S. ambassador to France, Craig Stapleton, who is a business partner of George W. Bush, stated that nationals who do not accept Monsanto’s GMO crops will be “penalized”. He stated that the nations should be threatened with “military-styled trade wars”. So it is no surprise that the move to maintain Monsanto’s grip on France is all about the fact that the U.S. and other nations are continually pushing Monsanto’s agenda. Monsanto has major (and most likely financial) connections with political heads that have actually threatened to use these trade wars. In January, WikiLeaks cables came to light revealing the information concerning the deep involvement of Monsanto in political circles. In this cable, is a statement made by Craig Stapleton:

“Country team Paris recommends that we calibrate a target retaliation list that causes some pain across the EU since this is a collective responsibility, but that also focuses in part on the worst culprits. The list should be measured rather than vicious and must be sustainable over the long term, since we should not expect an early victory. Moving to retaliation will make clear that the current path has real costs to EU interests and could help strengthen European pro-biotech voices.”