fuckyeahanarchistbanners
fuckyeahanarchistbanners:

Our dreams will become your nightmares. Empty homes belong to us. Villa Amalias. // Athens, Greece // December 19, 2013
From Contra Info:
Below is a text by the Villa Amalias collective.
Villa is here. It still stands at the full height of those who gave rise to the squat for 22 consecutive years, the thousands of individuals who visited the building and created within it.
Its full height feels insuperable.
All those who will sell properties on high prices in the area after its eviction—
All those who direct and play political games in its name—
All those who talk about the makeup of downtown Athens, and devalue human existence day after day—
All those who are subordinates or supporters of Nazi and nationalist formations, and under their skin and in their mind cannot withstand the “thorn” that causes them to bleed, the obstacle that stands against their racist campaign in the district—
All those who bleed us dry day after day under the umbrella of national unity and the land’s rescue—
All these people will never reach the peak of Villa, or of any other squat and self-organized space. Simply because they do not see the peak.
And how could they ever see it when they are only looking at their pockets, the ballot box, the camera, their peace of mind.
You must keep your head up high to see the sky.
From the rooftop, the walls, the yard, the shadows, the breaths, the street…SQUAT FOREVER VILLA AMALIAS
Squats belong to the people of struggle.
“Our dreams will become your nightmares”
… minions and bosses, shove the €3,500,000 budget for the reconstruction of Villa Amalias up your arse.

fuckyeahanarchistbanners:

Our dreams will become your nightmares. Empty homes belong to us. Villa Amalias. // Athens, Greece // December 19, 2013

From Contra Info:

Below is a text by the Villa Amalias collective.

Villa is here. It still stands at the full height of those who gave rise to the squat for 22 consecutive years, the thousands of individuals who visited the building and created within it.

Its full height feels insuperable.

All those who will sell properties on high prices in the area after its eviction—

All those who direct and play political games in its name—

All those who talk about the makeup of downtown Athens, and devalue human existence day after day—

All those who are subordinates or supporters of Nazi and nationalist formations, and under their skin and in their mind cannot withstand the “thorn” that causes them to bleed, the obstacle that stands against their racist campaign in the district—

All those who bleed us dry day after day under the umbrella of national unity and the land’s rescue—

All these people will never reach the peak of Villa, or of any other squat and self-organized space. Simply because they do not see the peak.

And how could they ever see it when they are only looking at their pockets, the ballot box, the camera, their peace of mind.

You must keep your head up high to see the sky.

From the rooftop, the walls, the yard, the shadows, the breaths, the street…
SQUAT FOREVER
VILLA AMALIAS

Squats belong to the people of struggle.

“Our dreams will become your nightmares”

… minions and bosses, shove the €3,500,000 budget for the reconstruction of Villa Amalias up your arse.

theveganarchist

Thousands of people took to the streets of Athens on Thursday night to protest the murder of Greek antifascist Pavlos Fyssas. The protest, organised by the Greek KKE (Communist Party) included other left parties, antifascists, anarchists, unionists, students and pensioners. 

The message of the protest was loud and clear; that the working people of Greece will no longer accept the fascist thuggery of the Golden Dawn and their agents in the police.

There is no time for liberal wish-washing and protests about freedom of speech; this is the clearest evidence that allowing fascist parties a platform of legitimacy will lead them to commit violence and intimidate the public, especially the most vulnerable sections of it. Golden Dawn - and groups like them across the world - must be forcefully removed from the streets.

RIP Pavlos Fyssas

progenyofpenitence

fotojournalismus:

Greece | September 18, 2013

1. Riot police walk past a burning garbage bin in front of the Bank of Greece during a protest in Thessaloniki. Violent clashes broke out Wednesday in several Greek cities after a member of the country’s far-right Golden Dawn party was arrested in the fatal stabbing of a 34-year-old musician described as an anti-fascist activist. The stabbing drew condemnation from across Greece’s political spectrum and from abroad. While the extremist Golden Dawn has been blamed for numerous violent attacks in the past, the overnight stabbing is the most serious violence directly attributed to a member so far. (Nikolas Giakoumidis/AP)

2. Protesters holding banners cast their shadows as they march during an anti-government rally in front of the parliament in Athens. Greek workers shut schools and forced hospitals to operate with only emergency staff on Wednesday at the start of a 48-hour strike against the latest plans to fire thousands of public sector employees. (Yorgos Karahalis /Reuters)

3. High school students shout slogans in solidarity with their striking teachers during a 48 hour general strike in Athens. (Kostas Tsironis/AP)

4. Protesters march in front of the parliament as words are seen on the ground during an anti-government rally in Athens. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)

5. Protesters from the health sector take part in a protest during a 48 hour general strike in Athens. (Kostas Tsironis/AP)

6. People gather at the site where Pavlos Fissas, a 35-year-old anti-racism rapper was stabbed to death, by a man who sympathized with the far-right Golden Dawn group, at Keratsini suburb southwest of Athens. Fissas, 35, who went by the stage name Killah P, was stabbed twice in the heart and chest on Tuesday night in a brawl after a soccer match shown in a cafe in Keratsini, a working-class suburb of Athens. (John Kolesidis/Reuters)

7. Riot police officers detain protesters after clashes between police and anti-fascist protesters in the northern Greek town of Thessaloniki. (Alexandros Avramidis/Reuters)

8. A protester is chased by police during clashes between police and anti-fascist protesters following the killing of a 35-year-old anti-racism rapper in an Athens suburb. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)

9. A protester throws a flare to riot police during a protest at the suburb of Keratsini near Athens. (Kostas Tsironis/AP)

Educators resist: What Greece’s & Mexico’s teachers have in common
September 17, 2013

I had the opportunity to pass by the Zócalo in Mexico City in the last days of August 2013 and see with my own eyes the occupation of the square and the surrounding streets by the public school teachers of CNTE, the National Coordinating Committee of Education Workers. It was impressive to see the — really huge — square of Mexico City having been transformed into a massive tent-city by the public teachers on strike, and it was even more impressive to sense how determined they were in their struggle.

The teachers were resisting to Peña Nieto’s “neoliberalization of education” that would put the — already extremely unequal — Mexican public education system under the orders of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and make it “autonomous”: forced to look for funds from the private sector. At the same time, the President’s reforms promised to establish some kind of “performance controls” for the teachers.

Of course, this indirect privatization of public schools was downplayed by the state-controlled (or vice-versa?) Mexican media, which focused on the “quality controls” finally imposed on the “lazy and privileged” teachers. The teachers on their own turn mobilized, organized marches and bloqueos and — most importantly — occupied the main square of the capital in thousands since the 19th of August 2013. The teachers’ mobilization lasted for three weeks until his highness, the Butcher of Atenco — a.k.a. Enrique Peña Nieto — ordered the police to brutally evict the teachers from the Zócalo, on 14 September 2013.

At the same time, in austerity-stricken Greece, the Federation of Secondary Education State School Teachers (OLME) announced a national five-day rolling strike starting on the 16th of September 2013. The reasons? As OLME put it in a public announcement:

The situation in public schools is dramatic:

  • There are 16,000 fewer teachers in secondary education meaning a 20% reduction since June 2013.

  • 102 Vocational Education Schools are closing down.

  • 2,500 Vocational Education Teachers are being suspended — just a step before dismissals.

  • In 2009, there was 33% reduction of spending on education which is expected to reach 47% in 2016.

  • There is a compulsory transfer of 5,000 teachers to primary education and administration posts.

  • The government has passed a new law on education without a dialogue establishing a harsh, examination-centered system in all forms/grades of upper secondary education forcing students to seek private tuition outside school and leading to school drop-outs. The government proceeds with:
  • The privatization of a  part of Vocational Education
  • The introduction of apprenticeship as a form of minor/under-age employment replacing education process.

If in Mexico it was the OECD and the country’s ruling elite, in Greece the Troika of foreign lenders (made up of the EU, ECB and IMF) and its servant government decided that — after the civil servants, the [profitable!] state owned enterprises, the national broadcaster etc. — free and public education is also a “luxury” and a “burden” for the state budget and thus has to be cut. Let’s not forget that Greece is one of the very few countries in the EU where education is — until now — free and public and where universities especially are protected from privatization by the country’s constitution itself.

For that reason, free and public education has been threatened by neoliberal reforms several times in the past, always being protected by the country’s strong student movement. What we are witnessing these days is yet another attack on Greece’s free and public education by the neoliberal servant coalition of Antonis Samaras and Evangelos Venizelos, who hoped not to be met with resistance by the already socially and economically exhausted Greek society. Yet, this time, it was the Greek teachers who picked up the baton from their Mexican counterparts to fight for free and public education and for their dignity, as they stated in one of the videos they put on YouTube. “I go on strike — and I think we should all do so — because it is the only thing left to do for our dignity…” said one of them.

Full article

U.S. financial regulators to warn about student debt risks
April 25, 2013

The panel of senior U.S. regulators charged with safeguarding the financial system will warn this week about risks posed by the rapidly growing amount of student debt, increasing pressure on policymakers to deal with the potential problem.

At roughly $1 trillion and rising, education loans may hamper economic growth and limit home purchases as overly indebted households and young workers cut back on consumption and borrowing, the Financial Stability Oversight Council is poised to warn in its latest annual report, sources familiar with the matter said.

The yearly compendium on financial developments and potential risks to the financial system, prepared by the nine agencies that comprise FSOC, will be made public on Thursday. Student debt will not be presented as an immediate threat to financial stability, these people said, but its mention in the report as a risk is likely to alarm a sector that has been in policymakers’ sights for the past year.

FSOC joins the Federal Reserve’s interest rate-setting panel, the Federal Open Market Committee; the Treasury Department’s Office of Financial Research; the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in alerting about the possible danger student debt poses to either financial stability or the broader economy.

Huff Post Article Source

Graphics/Images Source

This is the reality of austerity: Greek children are starvingApril 22, 2013
Force-feeding Greece with budget cuts and tax increases gets a predictable, and tragic, results.
It’s not fair to blame Rogoff and Reinhart for the austerity craze that has gripped Europe. It is fair to say that their presentation of flawed data about the last half-century of growth and debt was used as intellectual ammunition in a total war on deficits that has destroyed families across the continent.
In Greece, the fog of austerity is more than a metaphor. This winter, a very real cloud of smoke haunted the city at night, as families burned felled trees and broken chairs to stay warm. While the economy has shrunk by a fifth and youth unemployment has screamed past 50 percent, the real tragedy can’t really be told with numbers. It’s simple, really. Children are starving.
The New York Times reports the heart-breaking details:
"He had eaten almost nothing at home," Mr. Nikas said, sitting in his cramped school office near the port of Piraeus, a working-class suburb of Athens, as the sound of a jump rope skittered across the playground. He confronted Pantelis’s parents, who were ashamed and embarrassed but admitted that they had not been able to find work for months. Their savings were gone, and they were living on rations of pasta and ketchup.
The euro was supposed to tie Europe together as a single unified economic powerhouse. When Greek children go malnourished while unemployment falls in Germany, you can see very clearly that unity is just another European myth. In the United States, we have an answer for weak state economies. It’s called Mississippi. They get a permanent “bail out” through an annual transfer of money: tax credits, Medicaid spending, infrastructure assistance, and so on. In Europe, the answer for failing state economies is: You get this bag of money if you take the following measures to destroy your economy.
You don’t need to know how to fact-check Harvard economists to understand a simple truth: Force-feeding austerity to a country starving for money and growth will only get you more starvation.
Source

This is the reality of austerity: Greek children are starving
April 22, 2013

Force-feeding Greece with budget cuts and tax increases gets a predictable, and tragic, results.

It’s not fair to blame Rogoff and Reinhart for the austerity craze that has gripped Europe. It is fair to say that their presentation of flawed data about the last half-century of growth and debt was used as intellectual ammunition in a total war on deficits that has destroyed families across the continent.

In Greece, the fog of austerity is more than a metaphor. This winter, a very real cloud of smoke haunted the city at night, as families burned felled trees and broken chairs to stay warm. While the economy has shrunk by a fifth and youth unemployment has screamed past 50 percent, the real tragedy can’t really be told with numbers. It’s simple, really. Children are starving.

The New York Times reports the heart-breaking details:

"He had eaten almost nothing at home," Mr. Nikas said, sitting in his cramped school office near the port of Piraeus, a working-class suburb of Athens, as the sound of a jump rope skittered across the playground. He confronted Pantelis’s parents, who were ashamed and embarrassed but admitted that they had not been able to find work for months. Their savings were gone, and they were living on rations of pasta and ketchup.

The euro was supposed to tie Europe together as a single unified economic powerhouse. When Greek children go malnourished while unemployment falls in Germany, you can see very clearly that unity is just another European myth. In the United States, we have an answer for weak state economies. It’s called Mississippi. They get a permanent “bail out” through an annual transfer of money: tax credits, Medicaid spending, infrastructure assistance, and so on. In Europe, the answer for failing state economies is: You get this bag of money if you take the following measures to destroy your economy.

You don’t need to know how to fact-check Harvard economists to understand a simple truth: Force-feeding austerity to a country starving for money and growth will only get you more starvation.

Source

At least 28 immigrants shot at Greece strawberry plantation after not being paid for six months
April 19, 2013

Greek police are hunting three strawberry plantation foremen, who are suspected of shooting nearly 30 workers, mostly Bangladeshi, after immigrants demanded wages they had not been paid for six months.

Officials have promised “swift and exemplary” punishment for the three foremen who disappeared after the incident that took place on April, 17 in Nea Manolada, about 260km (160 miles) west of Athens.

So far police arrested the owner of the farm, in the rural south of the country and a local man on suspicion of hiding the three foremen.

The violence allegedly occurred when one of the supervisors opened fire on a crowd of about 200 foreign workers gathered to request their unpaid salaries.

According to one of the immigrants, they were promised wages of 22 euros ($28.70) a day.

"They keep telling us that we will get paid in a month, and this has been going on for more than a year," Reuters quoted a man who refused to be identified.

The conflict resulted in at least 28 people being injured. Seven Bangladeshi workers are still receiving treatment in local hospitals, but none of them has life-threatening injuries.

The Greek government has condemned the “inhuman, unprecedented and shameful” shooting.

"This unprecedented and shameful act is foreign to Greek ethics," government spokesman Simos Kedikoglou said.

At the same time, the country’s main labor union, GSEE, has accused the government of failing to properly investigate conditions at Manolada.

“The criminal act in Manolada … shows the tragic results of labor exploitation, combined with a lack of control” [by the government labor inspectorate]”, a GSEE statement said. “In Manolada, and particularly in the strawberry plantations, a sort of state within a state has been created.”

Wednesday’s attack has been called the worst of all recent attacks on migrant strawberry workers in Greece, the country that mostly Asian and African asylum seekers see as a gateway to the European Union.

The Greek department of the Doctors of the World medical aid group suggested the shooting should be treated as a case of racist violence, a felony which carries more severe penalties.

“The protracted financial crisis, combined with a constantly growing mood of xenophobia and tolerance for racist violence, is leading to incidents of barbarity and brutality that … insult Greece,” the group said.  

Following the violence, local supermarkets, Vasilopoulos and Chalkiadakis, announced that they would stop selling strawberries from the company that employed the alleged shooters.

Activists are now calling for a boycott of what they call slavery, by not buying Manolada berries.  

“By boycotting #Manolada’s #bloodstrawberries you’re sending a clear message that you do not condone slavery,” reads the statement on Twitter.

However, there are some who believe that illegally hired immigrant workers should be deported from crisis stricken Greece.

With unemployment hitting a record 27 percent, anti-immigrant sentiment has been rising in the country.

Right-wing extremist political party, Golden Dawn, which holds 18 seats of the 300-member Parliament, said in a statement Thursday that they “condemn those who illegally employ illegal immigrants, taking the bread away from thousands of Greek families.”

“All illegal immigrants must be immediately deported,” it said.

Source

Cypriot “no” inspires Greeks to rail against austerity
March 20, 2013

Greeks and opposition parties inspired by the Cypriot rejection of an unpopular bailout deal urged Athens on Wednesday to stand up to foreign lenders whose demands have resulted in repeated rounds of austerity that have made Greek life a misery.

Cyprus’s parliament on Tuesday rejected a levy on bank deposits demanded in return for aid, raising the spectre of a default for the island nation that could mean enduring wave after wave of spending cuts and tax rises, just like Greece.

"See what Cyprus did? We are proud of them," said Fey Papadopoulou, 22, a university student. "They should be an example for our politicians, who have succumbed to every demand."

Cyprus pleaded with Russia on Wednesday for a five-year extension and lower interest on an existing 2.5 billion euro ($3.22 billion) loan and 5 billion euros in new loans after voting down euro zone plan for a 10 billion euro bailout.

"The Cypriots set an example to follow," left-leaning Eleftherotypia said in its leading editorial. "How can the Cypriots say ‘no’ and we can’t even reject a single property tax?", ran a headline on Greek television channel Antenna.

Greece which first sought aid from European Union and the International Monetary Fund in 2010, has yielded to demands for harsh austerity measures that have slashed household income by almost a third and sent unemployment up to a record 26 percent.

"Cyprus said ‘No’ on our behalf too," said Odysseas Panagiotou, a 45-year old clerk. "It’s about time that our traitors - politicians - say a big ‘No’ to the troika demands."

The “no” vote from Nicosia comes just days before Athens and its lenders resume delicate talks on the implementation of the country’s bailout, with creditors pushing Athens to respect past pledges to fire civil servants and stick to unpopular tax rises.

Merkel’s Strategy

Whether Athens - which in the past has ignored riots and mass protests to approve austerity packages and avert bankruptcy - will be swayed by the latest outcry depends on whether Cyprus ends up bankrupt or finds a solution elsewhere, analysts said.

"If Cyprus goes bankrupt, then the government’s argument that we must stay on the austerity path will be reinforced, but if it wins better bailout terms the main opposition’s arguments will be stronger," said Thomas Gerakis, head of Marc pollsters.

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras’s government - which has been scrambling to assure Greeks that their bank deposits are not at risk due to the Cypriot crisis - said late on Tuesday it supported Cyprus’s choices.

But Greece’s anti-bailout opposition, including the radical leftist Syriza party, rushed to accuse him and Finance Minister Yiannis Stournaras of bowing to the austerity demands of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

"After the Cypriots’ proud ‘no’, Mr. Samaras and Mr. Stournaras are the most faithful adherents of Ms. Merkel’s strategy," said a statement from Syriza, Greece’s most popular party according to a MARC/Alpha survey published on Tuesday.

"The Cypriot parliament shows the way of real negotiation, which no pro-bailout government in Greece even considered."

Syriza also interpreted a statement late on Tuesday by the European Central Bank to continue funding Cypris banks within existing rules, as a sign of weakness on the part of creditors.

"And just like that, we found out that another way is possible," Syriza deputy Rena Dourou tweeted a few minutes after the ECB statement was release.

Source

Thousands of Greeks protest planned gold mining site that would be destructive to the environment
March 9, 2013

More than 10,000 people have taken to the streets of Greece’s second largest city to protest a planned gold mine they see as an environmental risk.

Police blocked the crowd’s march to the Canadian Consulate in Thessaloniki, but Saturday’s protest took place and ended peacefully. Eldorado Gold Corp., based in Vancouver, Canada, has been granted the rights to the gold mine in Halkidiki peninsula, east of Thessaloniki.

The company has established a camp employing 1,200 people and plans to begin digging soon.

The issue has bitterly divided Halkidiki residents, with some claiming the mine will harm tourism and release toxic substances, and others denying that and saying new jobs are crucial during Greece’s severe economic crisis.

Source

Thousands of Greek university students protest against a higher education ‘reform’ bill, amid the government’s austerity measures.
March 7, 2013

The students held a rally in front of the parliament on Wednesday, opposing the administration’s plan to close down or merge 350 university departments and faculties. 

“We want our diplomas, not worthless documents,” chanted the protesters.

As a result of the reform, many students might have to move to other cities to complete their studies or end up holding a different degree than what they initially planned. 

This comes only a few days after another demonstration by primary and secondary state school teachers and unionists held in Athens against relentless budgetary restrictions in the country’s public education sector. 

Athens aims to cut 150,000 public sector jobs by 2015, including 25,000 before the end of this year. 

Over the past years, workers’ salaries and pensions have been cut, resulting in the country’s citizens to stage strikes and demonstrations numerous times to voice their dissatisfaction. 

Greece has been at the epicenter of the eurozone debt crisis and is experiencing its sixth year of recession, while harsh austerity measures have left tens of thousands of people without jobs.

Source

The People’s Record Daily News Update 
Here’s a collection of news stories for February 20, 2013 that you may not otherwise have a chance to see/learn about.

Courts have officially ruled that a Metropolitan Police Department officer’s first amendment rights were violated when he was punished for publicly criticizing the ‘DC crime prevention’ program.

Chief of Police Cathy Lanier ordered a documentation of counseling to be placed in Detective William Hawkins’ performance-documentation file after he spoke openly to the Washington Postfor a 2009 article about the department’s All Hands on Deck initiative. That program, which has since been retired by the department, required all officers in the city to report for scheduled weekend-shifts in an attempt to flood the streets with law enforcement and ideally thwart crime. It was condemned by Detective Hawkins and the police union, however, who said the program was inefficient and in violation of bargaining contracts, respectively.

In an effort to promote equal-opportunity murder of civilians, police departments can now purchase target practice pregnant women and small children to shoot at, without hesitation.

For only 99 cents per sheet, Law Enforcement Targets Inc. allows customers to order life-like posters that show that people of all walks of life could be potential threats to police officers. Among the targets available in their “No More Hesitation” series for shooting practice are enlarged photographs of a pregnant woman, children holding hands and a high-school aged girl.

In every image, the suspect is showing holding a gun, meant to force officers of the law to act without hesitation in even the most unusual life-or-death scenarios. In a statement emailed to Reason on Tuesday afternoon, the marketing team at Law Enforcement Targets explains the thought process involved in selling realistic targets that let people open fire on young children and the elderly alike.

"The subjects in NMH targets were chosen in order to give officers the experience of dealing with deadly force shooting scenarios with subjects that are not the norm during training,” the statement begins.

Greek workers walk out in fresh austerity protests & actions

Thousands of Greek workers walked off the job on Wednesday in the first nationwide protest against austerity this year, shutting schools, reducing staffing at state hospitals and disrupting transportation.

The 24-hour strike was called by the country’s two main labor unions, which represent about 2.5 million workers and have led public resistance to three years of austerity measures that have raised taxes and cut salaries and pensions. The unions called on Greeks to join them in protest rallies in Athens and other cities on Wednesday to oppose “dead-end policies that have squeezed the life out of workers and impoverished citizens,” slashing average incomes by a third and pushing unemployment to 27 percent.

Anti-fracking protests shut down gas drilling in Ohio for hours

Authorities say a protest by members of environmental groups temporarily shut down operations at a gas drilling waste storage site in southeast Ohio.

The Washington County sheriff’s office said it happened Tuesday at the GreenHunter Water storage facility in New Matamoras on the Ohio River.

About 100 people staged the protest, which included one of them perching on a chair at the top of a 30-foot pole. Operations at the facility — which stores wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking — were disrupted for about four hours.

Yale will train US Special Forces in interrogation techniques using immigrants as guinea pigs

Yale University is planning to train US Special Forces to detect lies by practicing on immigrants. The program strives to provide soldiers with such interview tactics by practicing on “someone they can’t necessarily identify with”.

Starting as early as April, the university will launch a new training center on its campus for interrogators to prepare the Green Berets for overseas interrogations. Yuck.

Thousands protest in Armenia after conservative Republican president is re-elected

About 5,000 flag-waving protesters rallied on Wednesday against Armenian President Serzh Sarksyan’s re-election, saying his victory was tainted by fraud. Supporters of Sarksyan’s second-placed rival Raffi Hovannisian filled Freedom Square in the center of the capital Yerevan to condemn what they said were uncounted ballots and other violations.

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Striking workers at the Vio.Me factory in Thessaloniki, Greece who have not been paid since May 2011 have decided to restart production under workers’ control on February 12, 2013 (tomorrow). 

With unemployment climbing to 30%, workers’ income reaching zero, sick and tired of big words, promises and more taxes, unpaid since May 2011 and currently withholding their labour, with the factory abandoned by the employers, the workers of Vio.Me. by decision of their general assembly declare their determination not to fall prey to a condition of perpetual unemployment, but instead to struggle to take the factory in their own hands and operate it themselves. Through a formal proposal dating from October 2011 they have been claiming the establishment of a workers’ cooperative under full workers’ control, demanding legal recognition for their own workers’ cooperative, as well as for all the others to follow. At the same time they have been demanding the money required to put the factory in operation, money that in any case belongs to them, as they are the ones who produce the wealth of society. The plan that was drawn up met with the indifference of the state and of trade union bureaucracies. But it was received with great enthusiasm by the world of the social movements, which, through the creation of the Open Initiative of Solidarity in Thessaloniki and afterwards with similar initiatives in many other cities, have been struggling for the past 6 months to spread the message of Vio.Me across society.

Now it’s time for worker´s control of Vio.Me.!

The workers cannot wait any longer for the bankrupt state to fulfil its gratuitous promises of support (even the 1000-euro emergency aid promised by the Ministry of Labour was never approved by the Minister of Finance). It’s time to see the Vio.Me. factory –as well as any other factory that is closing down, going bankrupt or laying off its workers- reopened but its workers, and not by its old or new bosses. The struggle should not be limited to Vio.Me., in order for it to be victorious it should be generalized and spread to all the factories and businesses that are closing down, because only through a network of self-managed factories will Vio.Me be able to thrive and light the way towards a different organisation of production and the economy, with no exploitation, inequality or hierarchy.

When factories are closing down one after another, the number of the unemployed in Greece is approaching 2 million and the vast majority of the population is condemned to poverty and misery by the governing coalition of PASOK-ND-DIMAR, which continues the policies of the preceding governments, the demand to operate the factories under workers’ control is the only reasonable response to the disaster that we experience every day, the only answer to unemployment; for that reason, the struggle of Vio.Me. is everyone’s struggle.

We urge all workers, the unemployed and all those who are affected by the crisis to stand by the workers of Vio.Me and support them in their effort to put in practice the belief that workers can make it without bosses! We call them to participate in a nationwide Struggle and Solidarity Caravan culminating in three days of struggle in Thessaloniki. We urge them to take up the struggle and organize their own fights within their working places, with direct democratic procedures, without bureaucrats. To participate in a general political strike in order to oust those who destroy our lives!

Aiming to establish worker’s control over factories and the whole of production and to organize the economy and society that we desire, a society without bosses!

It’s Vio.Me.’s time. Let’s get to work!
Paving the way for workers’ self-management everywhere!
Paving the way for a society without bosses!

Open Initiative of Solidarity and Support to the struggle of the workers of Vio.Me.

From http://www.viome.org/

Man trampled as hundreds of desperate Greeks scuffle for foodFebruary 7, 2013
A fruit and vegetable handout in Greece led to one man being trampled on Wednesday, calling attention to the desperate conditions in the crisis-hit country. Some 55 tons of produce was given away by farmers who were protesting high production costs.
The person was injured when he was pushed by a crowd trying to grab the goods and fell and hit his head.
The chaos was sparked when food stalls ran out of fruits and vegetables, prompting dozens of people to rush to a nearby truck.
It was an “every man for himself” situation as the Greeks shoved their way to the front of the truck, competing for the food that was left. The 55 tons of food was completely gone in under two hours.
A Reuters employee at the scene was hit on the head with cauliflower heads as he attempted to photograph the situation.
"These images make me angry. Angry for a proud people who have no food to eat, who can’t afford to keep warm, who can’t make ends meet,"
Kostas Barkas, a lawmaker from the leftist Syriza party, told Reuters.
Other Greek lawmakers said the situation showed images “of people on the brink of despair” and the sense of“sadness for a proud people who have ended up like this.”
It’s a reality that many Greek citizens find hard to comprehend.
"It’s difficult. I never imagined that I would end up here," 65-year-old Panagiota Petropoulos said.
"I can’t afford anything, not even at the fruit market. Everything is expensive, prices of everything are going up while our income is going down and there are no jobs," she continued.
Greece, which is currently in its sixth year of recession, is experiencing record high unemployment rates. Citizens have been forced to endure wage and pension cuts to satisfy European Union and International Monetary Fund demands.
The handout was an attempt by farmers to persuade the government to give them a 50 per cent price reduction on diesel-powered farm equipment, abolish the obligatory declaration for cultivation and cut Value Added Tax from 23 per cent to 6 per cent on their products and agricultural machinery and equipment.
Strikes continue to take place in various sectors, as workers protest the government’s austerity plan.
On Wednesday, Greece’s ruling coalition forced striking seamen to return to work after a six-day action that suspended ferry services to dozens of Greek Islands. The strike led to food and medical shortages.
But when one strike ends, others continue.
Farmers throughout the country are in their ninth day of demonstrations, staging roadblocks with their tractors on highways across Greece on Wednesday.
Journalists working for state broadcasters went into a third day of strikes on Wednesday, protesting against the government’s policies regulating the sector. The strike is scheduled to continue until Thursday.
Various Greek Unions have held a wave of strikes over the past three years to protest the harsh austerity measures taken to secure international rescue loans.
Source
Unemployment for workers under 25 is now at 57.6 percent, & more than one fifth of the population lives in poverty in Greece. Austerity measures have also cut wages by 60 percent. The IMF & the EU are planning more cuts to the minimum wage & public sector wages.

Man trampled as hundreds of desperate Greeks scuffle for food
February 7, 2013

A fruit and vegetable handout in Greece led to one man being trampled on Wednesday, calling attention to the desperate conditions in the crisis-hit country. Some 55 tons of produce was given away by farmers who were protesting high production costs.

The person was injured when he was pushed by a crowd trying to grab the goods and fell and hit his head.

The chaos was sparked when food stalls ran out of fruits and vegetables, prompting dozens of people to rush to a nearby truck.

It was an “every man for himself” situation as the Greeks shoved their way to the front of the truck, competing for the food that was left. The 55 tons of food was completely gone in under two hours.

A Reuters employee at the scene was hit on the head with cauliflower heads as he attempted to photograph the situation.

"These images make me angry. Angry for a proud people who have no food to eat, who can’t afford to keep warm, who can’t make ends meet,"

Kostas Barkas, a lawmaker from the leftist Syriza party, told Reuters.

Other Greek lawmakers said the situation showed images “of people on the brink of despair” and the sense of“sadness for a proud people who have ended up like this.”

It’s a reality that many Greek citizens find hard to comprehend.

"It’s difficult. I never imagined that I would end up here," 65-year-old Panagiota Petropoulos said.

"I can’t afford anything, not even at the fruit market. Everything is expensive, prices of everything are going up while our income is going down and there are no jobs," she continued.

Greece, which is currently in its sixth year of recession, is experiencing record high unemployment rates. Citizens have been forced to endure wage and pension cuts to satisfy European Union and International Monetary Fund demands.

The handout was an attempt by farmers to persuade the government to give them a 50 per cent price reduction on diesel-powered farm equipment, abolish the obligatory declaration for cultivation and cut Value Added Tax from 23 per cent to 6 per cent on their products and agricultural machinery and equipment.

Strikes continue to take place in various sectors, as workers protest the government’s austerity plan.

On Wednesday, Greece’s ruling coalition forced striking seamen to return to work after a six-day action that suspended ferry services to dozens of Greek Islands. The strike led to food and medical shortages.

But when one strike ends, others continue.

Farmers throughout the country are in their ninth day of demonstrations, staging roadblocks with their tractors on highways across Greece on Wednesday.

Journalists working for state broadcasters went into a third day of strikes on Wednesday, protesting against the government’s policies regulating the sector. The strike is scheduled to continue until Thursday.

Various Greek Unions have held a wave of strikes over the past three years to protest the harsh austerity measures taken to secure international rescue loans.

Source

Unemployment for workers under 25 is now at 57.6 percent, & more than one fifth of the population lives in poverty in Greece. Austerity measures have also cut wages by 60 percent. The IMF & the EU are planning more cuts to the minimum wage & public sector wages.