From Global Voices for Justice, a two-part interview with poet Joshua Clover, one of the recently triumphant Davis Dozen. The first part addresses Occupy and philosophy and crisis theory; the second part, on culture and poetry, is above. Clover reads two poems. The second concerns the problem of “how to set fire to fire”; the first contains the following lines: “You know all too well | that the best poetry is not | the least revolution | you know also that poetry | is the best way available to you | to affirm this truth.” Among all else that gets discussed, someone at The Poetry Foundation chose to transcribe the following: 

I take an almost mystical satisfaction from poetry’s strangeness and it’s strange beauty and that satisfaction is important to me and I want to preserve it. But, I don’t think that poetry is a satisfactory revolutionary force. The thing that I’ve been saying for several years now is, listen, it’s a good time for poets to get out in the streets and struggle and it will make their poetry better… don’t figure out what kind of poetry you can write to make the world better, get out into the streets and struggle and your poetry will change for it.

Speaking of The Poetry Foundation, Clover and Juliana Spahr applied for a job there last year; their letter is well worth a read as well. 

Submitted by:  afieryflyingroule

The Bulgarian uprising largely ignored by the corporate media continues into it’s 8th day
June 23, 2013

For the eighth straight day, tens of thousands of Bulgarians have demonstrated for the government to resign. At least 10,000 people have joined rallies in Sofia nightly since June 14.

On Friday, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso expressed concern over political developments and the rule of law in Bulgaria after protests followed the appointment, since withdrawn, of a media mogul as the country’s national security chief. Though the protests began in reaction to that appointment, they have turned into demonstrations against the Socialist-backed government and politicians in general.

"We demand that the oligarchy resign from political office so that Bulgaria can conform to European Union standards," organizers demanded.

Barroso highlighted the appointment of media mogul Delyan Peevski, who lacked experience in security matters, to head of the state agency DANS. The parliament, which had initially approved the appointment, later reversed it unanimously. The European Union has monitored Bulgaria since it joined in 2007 as it works to meeting the bloc’s demands on judicial reform, corruption and organized crime. On Prime Minister Plamen Oresharski’s inaugural trip to Brussels, Barosso said that he urged him to “consult widely on key appointments, especially in the areas of the fight against corruption and organized crime.”

"Some of the recent developments in Bulgaria were not good, and they raised concerns not only in Bulgarian society but among the European partners of Bulgaria," Barroso said. "The candidates chosen should be based on merit, and they should have the highest standards of integrity," he added.

The technocratic prime minister came to power at the head of a Socialist-led government last month after a snap election followed the resignation of the conservative coalition in February. Since then, however, thousands have been demonstrating against corruption and organized crime while the conservatives are boycotting parliament and demanding new elections.

"I will persevere in my efforts to ensure the normalization of the political and public situation in the country," Oresharski pledged, adding that his government took the EU’s recommendations seriously. "We will persevere in our efforts to build the confidence of our partners in the EU," he added.

For his part, Bulgaria’s president praised the protest rallies on Friday, saying that politicians must heed the demonstrators’ demands for reform. “Bulgaria can be proud of this good-natured, democratic protest, which delivers a message to the politicians,” said President Rosen Plevneliev, who holds a largely ceremonial office. “I very much hope they will be heard and that this time the politicians really take responsible, clear and, I would say, brave decisions,” he added.

An opinion poll by Alpha Research published this week found that over 80 percent of Bulgarians support the protests, though respondents split nearly evenly on whether the Cabinet should immediately resign. The poll also found that only 23 percent of respondents approved of the new coalition of the Socialists and the ethnic Turkish MRF party, the lowest level for any government since 1997. About 28 percent of respondents to the June 13-18 survey expressed disapproval.

Protesters have planned further rallies for the weekend.

Source

Rescuers in Bangladesh have found a survivor in the rubble of a clothing factory that collapsed 17 days ago
May 10, 2013

Bangladeshi television channels broadcast live footage of emergency service workers pulling the woman out from the debris, as onlookers burst into cheers.

The woman, called Reshma, was discovered on the second floor of the eight-storey Rana Plaza building in the capital Dhaka, where crews had been focusing on recovering bodies, not rescuing survivors, for much of the past two weeks. She told a TV company from her hospital bed:

"I heard voices of the rescue workers for the past several days. I kept hitting the wreckage with sticks and rods just to attract their attention. No one heard me. It was so bad for me. I never dreamed I’d see the daylight again. There was some dried food around me. I ate the dried food for 15 days. The last two days I had nothing but water. I used to drink only a limited quantity of water to save it. I had some bottles of water around me."

She was discovered in the wreckage of a Muslim prayer room in the building and army officials immediately ordered the cranes and bulldozers to stop work. Once Reshma finally got their attention, the crews ordered the cranes and bulldozers to immediately stop work and used handsaws and welding and drilling equipment to cut through the iron rod and debris still trapping her.

They gave her water, oxygen and saline as they worked to free her, using handsaws to cut through the rubble, as hundreds of people who had been engaged in the grim job of removing decomposing bodies from the site, raised their hands together in prayer.

"Allah, you are the greatest, you can do anything. Please allow us all to rescue the survivor just found," said a man on a loudspeaker leading the prayers. "We seek apology for our sins. Please pardon us, pardon the person found alive."

Abdur Razzak, a warrant officer with the military’s engineering department who first spotted her in the wreckage, said she was in a remarkably good condition and could even walk.

Reshma told her rescuers there were no more survivors in her area. Workers began tearing through the nearby rubble anyway, hoping to find another person alive.

Source

Never be deceived that that rich will allow you to vote their wealth away.

Lucy Parsons, the Haymarket Square widow who internationalized the struggle for the eight-hour day and whose work led to the May Day rallies held around the world. Happy May Day!

Check this out for more on the Haymarket Martyrs, the origins of May Day, and Lucy Parsons: Lucy Parsons: An American Revolutionary

Oh look, it’s another blackface editorial in Vogue
April 19, 2013

Somehow, in 2013, yet another magazine has decided it would be a good idea to put a Caucasian model in literal blackface for a fashion editorial. This time, the culprit isVogue Netherlands. (In the recent past,Numéro, L’Officiel and Vogue Paris, have all come under for using blackface.)

Model Querelle Jansen stars in the May 2013 issue’s “Heritage Heroes,” sort of a retrospective editorial of some of Marc Jacobs’s work for Louis Vuitton. The styling of each look is, we guess, somehow meant to illustrate the inspiration of a particular collection. Marc Jacobs found inspiration in African-American cultural icons for his Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 collections–Grace Jones and Josephine Baker, respectively. Vogue Netherlands decided that the best way to convey those inspirations would be with some white models, black face paint and wigs of what looks like black hair, worn throughout. A caption from the editorial translates to “This collection is inspired by the style of the Parisian showgirl Josephine Baker, mixed with tribal influences.”

A couple of alternative ideas: use a model who already looks something like Grace Jones or Josephine Baker without face paint. Or just, you know, don’t paint a white person’s face black ever? Why is this even something we have to keep pointing out? European editors and stylists especially, it seems, are really not getting it.

Vogue Netherlands, though it’s a relatively new Vogue (it launched in March of last year), has a particularly bad track record with using non-white models. And lest we forget, the Netherlands is also the birthplace of the controversial “Zwarte Piet” tradition, wherein Dutch people dress up in blackface to celebrate Sinterklaas every year.

As many Dutch commenters have pointed out, Zwarte Piet takes place during Sinterklaas, a winter holiday that is similar to Christmas but preceeds it. Those in blackface are depicting a helper of Sinterklaas (essentially Santa Claus) who was either a slave or a white person covered in soot, depending on whom you ask. 

Source

Palestinian youth shot for protesting has diedMarch 9, 2013
A Palestinian who was hit in the head by a rubber bullet during a protest which erupted after a prisoner died in Israeli custody has died of his wounds, medical officials say.
"Mohammed Asfour died this morning after being in hospital for a long time after he was injured during a demonstration," a spokesman for Tel Aviv’s Ichilov hospital said on Thursday.
Asfour, a 22-year-old student studying sports, was wounded in the head by a rubber-coated steel bullet fired by Israeli troops during a demonstration in the West Bank village of Abud on February 22, activists said.
Israeli rights group B’Tselem demanded that the military launch an immediate inquiry into the incident and four other cases where Palestinians were seriously injured by army fire.
"[It]must not only examine the immediate circumstances in which Asfour was killed, but also the orders that were given for use of these bullets during the event, the measures that were taken to ensure soldiers’ familiarity with the orders, and the command responsibility for the shooting," it said in a statement.
"The goal of holding the shooters accountable and preventing similar cases by deterring other soldiers must apply to cases of severe injury, as well as to cases of death," it added.
Asfour was initially taken to a Palestinian hospital but later transferred to Ichilov, they said.
The protest erupted after news leaked out that a Palestinian man had died in Israeli custody after being interrogated by the Shin Bet internal security service, sparking angry demonstrations across the territories.
Asfour was to be buried on Friday after the weekly prayers in his home village of Abud, some 20km northwest of Ramallah.
Months of hunger strikes
His death comes after weeks of heightened tensions across the West Bank over the issue of Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails, some of whom have been on hunger strike for months.
The strikes are to protest poor conditions inside the jails and the issue of administrative detention by Israeli forces of Palestinians.
The protests intensified on February 23 after news emerged that Arafat Jaradat, 30, had died after days of Shin Bet interrogation on suspicion of throwing stones.
Palestinian officials claim that a joint autopsy showed Jaradat died after being tortured, but Israel says further tests are needed to determine the cause of death.
Meanwhile, the Ramallah-based Prisoners Club said an Israeli military court had postponed a decision on whether or not to extend the detention without charge of two prisoners on long-term hunger strike.
Spokeswoman Amani Sarahne said the judge “wanted to re-examine the evidence before deciding whether to renew the administrative detention orders” against Tareq Qaadan and Jafar Ezzedine who have been on intermittent hunger strike since November.
Both men were arrested on November 22 and handed a three-month administrative detention order which was due to expire or be renewed by a military court on February 22.
Sarahne said the judge was expected to rule on the issue “within days”.
Figures published by B’Tselem at the end of January show there are currently 4,500 Palestinians being held by Israel, of whom 159 are being held in administrative detention.
Source

Palestinian youth shot for protesting has died
March 9, 2013

A Palestinian who was hit in the head by a rubber bullet during a protest which erupted after a prisoner died in Israeli custody has died of his wounds, medical officials say.

"Mohammed Asfour died this morning after being in hospital for a long time after he was injured during a demonstration," a spokesman for Tel Aviv’s Ichilov hospital said on Thursday.

Asfour, a 22-year-old student studying sports, was wounded in the head by a rubber-coated steel bullet fired by Israeli troops during a demonstration in the West Bank village of Abud on February 22, activists said.

Israeli rights group B’Tselem demanded that the military launch an immediate inquiry into the incident and four other cases where Palestinians were seriously injured by army fire.

"[It]must not only examine the immediate circumstances in which Asfour was killed, but also the orders that were given for use of these bullets during the event, the measures that were taken to ensure soldiers’ familiarity with the orders, and the command responsibility for the shooting," it said in a statement.

"The goal of holding the shooters accountable and preventing similar cases by deterring other soldiers must apply to cases of severe injury, as well as to cases of death," it added.

Asfour was initially taken to a Palestinian hospital but later transferred to Ichilov, they said.

The protest erupted after news leaked out that a Palestinian man had died in Israeli custody after being interrogated by the Shin Bet internal security service, sparking angry demonstrations across the territories.

Asfour was to be buried on Friday after the weekly prayers in his home village of Abud, some 20km northwest of Ramallah.

Months of hunger strikes

His death comes after weeks of heightened tensions across the West Bank over the issue of Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails, some of whom have been on hunger strike for months.

The strikes are to protest poor conditions inside the jails and the issue of administrative detention by Israeli forces of Palestinians.

The protests intensified on February 23 after news emerged that Arafat Jaradat, 30, had died after days of Shin Bet interrogation on suspicion of throwing stones.

Palestinian officials claim that a joint autopsy showed Jaradat died after being tortured, but Israel says further tests are needed to determine the cause of death.

Meanwhile, the Ramallah-based Prisoners Club said an Israeli military court had postponed a decision on whether or not to extend the detention without charge of two prisoners on long-term hunger strike.

Spokeswoman Amani Sarahne said the judge “wanted to re-examine the evidence before deciding whether to renew the administrative detention orders” against Tareq Qaadan and Jafar Ezzedine who have been on intermittent hunger strike since November.

Both men were arrested on November 22 and handed a three-month administrative detention order which was due to expire or be renewed by a military court on February 22.

Sarahne said the judge was expected to rule on the issue “within days”.

Figures published by B’Tselem at the end of January show there are currently 4,500 Palestinians being held by Israel, of whom 159 are being held in administrative detention.

Source

Sri Lanka military blocks protest over missing relatives
March 6, 2013

Sri Lanka’s security forces blocked hundreds of mostly ethnic Tamils from travelling to Colombo for a protest on Wednesday to demand justice for relatives missing after the island’s war.

Protesters were kept away from the capital because the government did not want the protest to go ahead.

In the end, the mainly elderly women protested in Vavuniya, where they had been halted some 260 km (160 miles) north of the capital, holding pictures of their relatives and demanding the government help find them, television footage showed.

"The police and army prevented us coming to Colombo saying that the Vavuniya to Colombo passage was not safe. But we don’t buy that story," Mano Ganesan, an opposition politician who was with the protesters, told Reuters.

Ganesan said the government, which has been accused of a myriad of abuses in the chaotic end of the war, was behind the move. The military denied that.

"There had been some complaints to police that there were stonings of buses and vehicles on the way to Colombo. So for their own safety, police have stopped them," military spokesman Ruwan Wanigasooriya said.

Tens of thousands of civilians were killed in 2009, in the final months of a war that began in 1983, a U.N. panel has said, as government troops advanced on the last stronghold of the Tamil Tiger rebels fighting for an independent homeland.

The panel said it had “credible allegations” that troops and the Tamil Tigers both carried out atrocities and war crimes, but singled out the government for most of the responsibility for the deaths. The government rejects the allegation.

Separately in Colombo, several hundred protesters handed over a letter to the U.N. office demanding an account of how tens of thousands of service personnel and civilians were killed or left missing at the hands of the Tamil Tigers.

Source

I’m not exactly sure, but I’ll do my best to offer a starting place. 
I really don’t claim to be an expert so if I’m listing these areas and readers out there are like ‘WHAT?! I KNOW SOME GREAT BLOGS ABOUT THAT?!’ just reblog and list them and I will be really appreciative.
But in terms of news, I think domestic politics in pretty much all Western countries, and large segments of the Middle East are pretty well documented on Tumblr (and often on this blog). We (The People’s Record) don’t do a near complete enough job covering internal domestic politics in Central America, South America, East & South-East Asia, or Africa.
We also don’t do a good enough job covering indigenous issues, throughout the world and particularly in the above mentioned places.
In terms of analysis, I personally see a lack in/would like to see more blogs or even get some people writing columns for The People’s Record that:
Compare & discuss the differences between various tendencies in revolutionary politics: Trotskyists vs Maoists vs anarcho-syndicalists, etc. Something fair minded and critical of all the tendencies (since none has technically liberated us from capitalism or imperialism or ended colonialism yet). But I think a thoughtful blog or column about that would be really helpful, I’ve been thinking about writing one myself but I’m concerned I would start and then not finish, lol.
It would be cool to see a blog just dedicated to co-ops, cooperatively run economies, anarcho-syndicalism and democratic workplaces
International news blogs and/or a column representing/covering perspectives of international happenings from non-Western points-of-view. Like, what’s being said about India in the Chilean media, or how is the first female president of South Korea being received across the South-African blogosphere, for instance.
 I’d like to see a blog and/or column focused on ‘what capitalism does’ to various aspects of society: like medical care, law enforcement,
Lastly, something that dares to speculate/discuss/inspire-discussions about the particular forms a new world might take, how we might alternatively structure society, what could it look like – would we want to get rid of all the concrete as the anarchist chant goes: ‘Whose streets? No streets. Tear down the concrete.’ How would that work? Would we try and build large-scale rails for transportation? How might new technologies be utilized to make a new world more possible, (a tech focused/leftist/radical/revolutionary blog might be really cool) etc?
Add your own to the list, Tumblr. And if anyone wants to write about any of this (or anything along these lines) for The People’s Record in a regular column or even just post about this stuff regularly for us to reblog, send us an email: thepeoplesrec@gmail.com 
If we haven’t gotten back to you yet, that’s because we are terrible slackers and not because we don’t want to work with you. We will be catching up on those messages shortly. We’re trying to compile a list so that we can transition into a larger team in the most efficient way possible. 

I’m not exactly sure, but I’ll do my best to offer a starting place. 

I really don’t claim to be an expert so if I’m listing these areas and readers out there are like ‘WHAT?! I KNOW SOME GREAT BLOGS ABOUT THAT?!’ just reblog and list them and I will be really appreciative.

  1. But in terms of news, I think domestic politics in pretty much all Western countries, and large segments of the Middle East are pretty well documented on Tumblr (and often on this blog). We (The People’s Record) don’t do a near complete enough job covering internal domestic politics in Central America, South America, East & South-East Asia, or Africa.
  2. We also don’t do a good enough job covering indigenous issues, throughout the world and particularly in the above mentioned places.
  3. In terms of analysis, I personally see a lack in/would like to see more blogs or even get some people writing columns for The People’s Record that:
  4. Compare & discuss the differences between various tendencies in revolutionary politics: Trotskyists vs Maoists vs anarcho-syndicalists, etc. Something fair minded and critical of all the tendencies (since none has technically liberated us from capitalism or imperialism or ended colonialism yet). But I think a thoughtful blog or column about that would be really helpful, I’ve been thinking about writing one myself but I’m concerned I would start and then not finish, lol.
  5. It would be cool to see a blog just dedicated to co-ops, cooperatively run economies, anarcho-syndicalism and democratic workplaces
  6. International news blogs and/or a column representing/covering perspectives of international happenings from non-Western points-of-view. Like, what’s being said about India in the Chilean media, or how is the first female president of South Korea being received across the South-African blogosphere, for instance.
  7.  I’d like to see a blog and/or column focused on ‘what capitalism does’ to various aspects of society: like medical care, law enforcement,
  8. Lastly, something that dares to speculate/discuss/inspire-discussions about the particular forms a new world might take, how we might alternatively structure society, what could it look like – would we want to get rid of all the concrete as the anarchist chant goes: ‘Whose streets? No streets. Tear down the concrete.’ How would that work? Would we try and build large-scale rails for transportation? How might new technologies be utilized to make a new world more possible, (a tech focused/leftist/radical/revolutionary blog might be really cool) etc?

Add your own to the list, Tumblr. And if anyone wants to write about any of this (or anything along these lines) for The People’s Record in a regular column or even just post about this stuff regularly for us to reblog, send us an email: thepeoplesrec@gmail.com

If we haven’t gotten back to you yet, that’s because we are terrible slackers and not because we don’t want to work with you. We will be catching up on those messages shortly. We’re trying to compile a list so that we can transition into a larger team in the most efficient way possible. 

Chilean government to prioritize constitutional recognition of indigenous
January 22, 2013

After the various Mapuche summits, President Piñera announced that the constitutional recognition of indigenous peoples would be a new priority of the government.

President Sebastián Piñera recently announced the reactivation of the project for a constitutional recognition of Chile’s indigenous peoples, as well as the creation of a council representing the different ethnic groups of the country.

This commitment marks an effort of the government to resolve the ongoing Mapuche conflict. The government, said the president, will declare the constitutional recognition a “legislative urgency”.  The bill has already been approved by the Senate, however, the impact of the initiative will be more symbolic than truly effective.

“I have decided to make the constitutional recognition and the creation of a council for indigenous peoples a priority. This council must be truly representative of their history, their traditions, their culture, but above all, will allow them to raise their own voices about their future,” Piñera stated.

In addition to these institutional reforms, he also emphasized that a plan would be put in place in order to encourage the economic and social development of the La Araucanía and Biobío regions. This plan, in La Araucanía, is already bearing fruit, according to the president.

“After long years of stagnation, La Araucanía has begun growing and creating jobs. Its unemployment rate has dropped to 6 percent.”

“We believe that Chile is a multicultural country. Among these various cultures, there is one that deserves special recognition: the culture of our indigenous peoples, who were here long before the Spanish conquistadors arrived,” the head of state highlighted.

At the same time, a new meeting was taking place in Temuco between Minister of Social Development Joaquín Lavín, Minister of the Interior Andrés Chadwick, and representatives of the Mapuche communities. The indigenous leaders questioned the government members about their representation, and the ability of the National Corporation for Indigenous Development (Conadi) to satisfy their demands, such as the creation of an Indigenous Ministry.

Minister Chadwick said that the information gathered through the different summits would allow the government to start working on reforms. However, he dismissed the possibility of an Indigenous Ministry, because “the existence of a state within another state is impossible”.

“Nobody can pretend that a dialogue will solve all the current problems,” he concluded.

Source 

It’s annoying how he said “I have decided,”… like it wasn’t that the Mapuches demanded recognition and built a movement around it or that the state was scared of Coordinadora Arauco-Malleco but instead, that he decided to ‘give’ constitutional rights. I wonder if it’s a translation thing or if he’s really just a prick. 

The United States & Canada even more-so have such tremendous responsibility to empower the communities our entire history has been built on the genocide of, and all we do instead is stifle, starve and subject. 

This is the second of our photoquote sets against imperialism.  Here’s the first photoset. We’ve uploaded all of these pictures (and many others) onto our Facebook photostream featuring activists, historic figures, writers, artists & movement leaders from various backgrounds and time periods, ideologically united against capitalism.

Our firstsecond and third photosets critical of capitalism can be found through their respective links. A photoset we did on the Prison Industrial Complex can be found here & a photoset we did on human rights for Palestinians here.

Help us reach a larger audience by liking and sharing our photos/page on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter (@ThePeoplesRec) & everywhere else!

Ramdev launches round two of protests
August 9, 2012
Yoga guru Ramdev on Thursday launched his second round of indefinite protest here demanding bringing back of black money stashed away abroad.

Ramdev arrived at the Ramlila Maidan protest venue, from where he was bundled out by police 14 months ago during a similar stir, to a rousing welcome from his supporters.

Before coming to the venue, he visited Mahatma Gandhi’s memorial Raj Ghat.

"I am here to pay my respect to the sacrifice made by Mahatama Gandhi. I am paying my respect to Bhagat Singh, Rajguru and 7,00,000 other martyrs whose sacrifice has sadly been compromised because of corruption and black money,” Ramdev said.

The second round of Ramdev’s protest witnesses an expansion of his agenda from black money to Lokpal Bill, making CBI independent and a more transparent procedure for appointing election commissioners, CAG, CVC and CBI director.
Source
Photo source (& story from the first round of his protest as referred to in the text)

Ramdev launches round two of protests

August 9, 2012

Yoga guru Ramdev on Thursday launched his second round of indefinite protest here demanding bringing back of black money stashed away abroad.

Ramdev arrived at the Ramlila Maidan protest venue, from where he was bundled out by police 14 months ago during a similar stir, to a rousing welcome from his supporters.

Before coming to the venue, he visited Mahatma Gandhi’s memorial Raj Ghat.

"I am here to pay my respect to the sacrifice made by Mahatama Gandhi. I am paying my respect to Bhagat Singh, Rajguru and 7,00,000 other martyrs whose sacrifice has sadly been compromised because of corruption and black money,” Ramdev said.

The second round of Ramdev’s protest witnesses an expansion of his agenda from black money to Lokpal Bill, making CBI independent and a more transparent procedure for appointing election commissioners, CAG, CVC and CBI director.

Source

Photo source (& story from the first round of his protest as referred to in the text)

Pussy Riot trial in Moscow erupts in chaos 
August 5, 2012
The central Khamovniki court in Moscow erupted in chaos Friday when defense witnesses for Pussy Riot – the three feminist punk rockers charged in what many consider a political show trial – were denied the opportunity to testify on the musicians’ behalf.
After the prosecution read a statement from their absent last witness (the senior priest at Moscow’s Christ the Savior Cathedral), the Pussy Riot defense team demanded that Judge Marina Syrova order guards to let in their witnesses, who have been kept out of the building. Syrova repeatedly ignored motions for witness testimonies. A huge barking Rottweiler kept in the courtroom, and three men in balaclavas outside yelling “Free Pussy Riot,” escalated the mayhem.
Two of the girls’ college professors and a friend were allowed to testify on the defendants’ character. One noted that bandmember Maria Alyokhina, 24, is a poet who volunteers at a hospital run by a Christian Orthodox organization. Yekaterina Samutsevich, 29, was characterized as a good student. A witness who was supposed to testify on the character of Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22, could not be found.
The prosecution questioned four other witnesses this week, including two women who cleaned the Bogoyavlensky Cathedral, where part of the video was filmed; a real estate agent who saw the video online and believes Pussy Riot declared war on God, Christianity and the government; and Samutsevich’s father, who called the arrest and trial absurd.
Syrova pushed some sessions this week up to 12 hours, which is a sign that the authorities want to close the case as soon as possible, according to Polozov. The longer the trial lasts, the more controversy it appears to be gathering.
On Thursday the Russian law association published an open letter, signed by 35 prominent lawyers, declaring that the Pussy Riot cathedral performance was no crime. President Vladimir Putin told journalists in London Thursday that although he believes there is nothing good about what the women have done, they should not be punished too severely.
But such statements have had no effect on the trial, Polozov said. “This isn’t a trial – it’s total chaos,” he said.
Source

Pussy Riot trial in Moscow erupts in chaos 

August 5, 2012

The central Khamovniki court in Moscow erupted in chaos Friday when defense witnesses for Pussy Riot – the three feminist punk rockers charged in what many consider a political show trial – were denied the opportunity to testify on the musicians’ behalf.

After the prosecution read a statement from their absent last witness (the senior priest at Moscow’s Christ the Savior Cathedral), the Pussy Riot defense team demanded that Judge Marina Syrova order guards to let in their witnesses, who have been kept out of the building. Syrova repeatedly ignored motions for witness testimonies. A huge barking Rottweiler kept in the courtroom, and three men in balaclavas outside yelling “Free Pussy Riot,” escalated the mayhem.

Two of the girls’ college professors and a friend were allowed to testify on the defendants’ character. One noted that bandmember Maria Alyokhina, 24, is a poet who volunteers at a hospital run by a Christian Orthodox organization. Yekaterina Samutsevich, 29, was characterized as a good student. A witness who was supposed to testify on the character of Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22, could not be found.

The prosecution questioned four other witnesses this week, including two women who cleaned the Bogoyavlensky Cathedral, where part of the video was filmed; a real estate agent who saw the video online and believes Pussy Riot declared war on God, Christianity and the government; and Samutsevich’s father, who called the arrest and trial absurd.

Syrova pushed some sessions this week up to 12 hours, which is a sign that the authorities want to close the case as soon as possible, according to Polozov. The longer the trial lasts, the more controversy it appears to be gathering.

On Thursday the Russian law association published an open letter, signed by 35 prominent lawyers, declaring that the Pussy Riot cathedral performance was no crime. President Vladimir Putin told journalists in London Thursday that although he believes there is nothing good about what the women have done, they should not be punished too severely.

But such statements have had no effect on the trial, Polozov said. “This isn’t a trial – it’s total chaos,” he said.

Source

Student movement begins to stir in Ottawa
July 23, 2012
Police arrested two adults in relation to a student protest pushing for free tuition downtown Sunday.
Around 40 protesters marched from Confederation Park to Major’s Hill Park starting at 3 p.m. with pots and pans to accompany their chants for free education.
Police arrested two protesters for common nuisance and mischief later in the afternoon. Police said demonstrators caused traffic disruptions and concerns during their march from Laurier Avenue to Major’s Hill Park by splitting into different directions in what is called a “Snake March.”
Organizer Ian Brannigan, 23, said the protest was over and most of the demonstrators had dispersed when a few police officers approached the small remaining group and arrested two of them, who made no move to resist.
“It’s exactly what’s been happening in Quebec,” Brannigan said. “I’m really disappointed it’s happening in Ottawa.”
The student protest made a point to stand in solidarity with similar movements in Quebec, where Montreal students have staged strikes and protests against proposed tuition rises and other issues since February. Thousands in Montreal participated in a demonstration Sunday.
Brannigan said the Ottawa arrests were a move by police to intimidate protesters, but showed that their movement was noticed. At 7 p.m., hours after the conclusion of the demonstration, he stood outside the police station waiting for the two arrested friends, calling for his network to join him.
The demonstration is the first of its kind in Ottawa, organized by Ottawa Students Mobilize! in collaboration with Solidarity Against Austerity. The 22nd day of the month is the same date in March and May where Montreal demonstrations saw turnouts of hundreds of thousands of people.
Source

Student movement begins to stir in Ottawa

July 23, 2012

Police arrested two adults in relation to a student protest pushing for free tuition downtown Sunday.

Around 40 protesters marched from Confederation Park to Major’s Hill Park starting at 3 p.m. with pots and pans to accompany their chants for free education.

Police arrested two protesters for common nuisance and mischief later in the afternoon. Police said demonstrators caused traffic disruptions and concerns during their march from Laurier Avenue to Major’s Hill Park by splitting into different directions in what is called a “Snake March.”

Organizer Ian Brannigan, 23, said the protest was over and most of the demonstrators had dispersed when a few police officers approached the small remaining group and arrested two of them, who made no move to resist.

“It’s exactly what’s been happening in Quebec,” Brannigan said. “I’m really disappointed it’s happening in Ottawa.”

The student protest made a point to stand in solidarity with similar movements in Quebec, where Montreal students have staged strikes and protests against proposed tuition rises and other issues since February. Thousands in Montreal participated in a demonstration Sunday.

Brannigan said the Ottawa arrests were a move by police to intimidate protesters, but showed that their movement was noticed. At 7 p.m., hours after the conclusion of the demonstration, he stood outside the police station waiting for the two arrested friends, calling for his network to join him.

The demonstration is the first of its kind in Ottawa, organized by Ottawa Students Mobilize! in collaboration with Solidarity Against Austerity. The 22nd day of the month is the same date in March and May where Montreal demonstrations saw turnouts of hundreds of thousands of people.

Tens of thousands take to the streets of Spain today to resist austerity!

July 19, 2012

Demonstrators protest against austerity measures announced by the Spanish government in Madrid, Spain, on Thursday July 19, 2012. Concerns over Spain’s attempts to restore market confidence in its economy resurfaced Thursday after a bond auction went poorly and its borrowing costs edged higher, even as the country’s Parliament passed the latest round of harsh austerity measures designed to cut its bloated deficit.

Source

JUNE GLOBAL ROUND-UP
July 06, 2012

To look back at the first time we covered student protests in Quebec a few months ago and to see where the movement is now is astonishing. Movements across South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and North America are continuing to develop and  accelerate at a rate we can hardly keep up with. Simultaneously, more and more people are becoming aware of the magnitude of these social movements, and that is only fueling the solidarity between these massive international social movements.

June has not led to any conclusions, only more possibilities. The People’s Record is excited to continue to track global social movements with our bi-monthly global round-ups and our daily reporting of protest news.

So far the month of June has been the busiest month in 2012 yet for global protest-movement news. Here’s a list of some of the protests and movements that shook the global capitalist system in the month of June:

June 1

June 2

June 3

June 4

June 5

  • Police detained some 20 brave activists who were protesting outside Russia’s parliament where deputies debated a Kremlin-backed bill to hike fines for violations during rallies, a proposal the opposition says is aimed at smothering dissent.
  • The “Dream Walkers,” undocumented youth who are walking from California to Washington, D.C. began a sit-in at Obama’s Colorado campaign headquarters that would continue for days with the students implementing a hunger strike into their protest two days later.

June 6

June 7

June 8

  • Taiwanese activists staged a protest in Taipei against US beef containing the feed additive ractopamine ahead of a parliamentary vote on a controversial bill to allow such imports.

June 9

June 10

June 11

June 12

June 13

June 14

June 15 

June 16

June 17

June 18

June 19

June 20

June 21

June 22

June 23

June 24

June 25

June 26

June 27

June 28

June 29

June 30

-R.Cunningham

To see the Global Round-ups from past months, click here.