From an email:

Hey comrades,

Recently, a campaign to target Sallie Mae’s central, detrimental role in the student debt crisis has began to build great traction. Conversations have been sparked amongst various collectives and organizations as to how everyone can participate to effectively target Sallie Mae and how together, this can be an avenue to make strong demands and envision alternatives on fundamental issues like free public higher education, racial justice, and equal access to education for immigrants.

Organizers at Jobs with Justice and Student Labor Action Project have already begun to coordinate efforts against the already beleaguered corporation by organizing workers in Sallie Mae call centers, to pressuring the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for tougher regulation to pursuing legal recourse for Sallie Mae’s redlining practices.

Here in New York, folks from New York Students Rising, Strike Debt, Occupy Student Debt Campaign, and All in the Red have been discussing what it would look like to continue to focus on Sallie Mae together in the context of building a broad-based coalition.  

We’d like to open up the discussion to organizers and activists across New York City (there will be a national call following this) to unpack what this could look like locally and nationally in the coming months. Please send this to anyone in and around NYC who may be interested and indicate your availability on this Doodle if you’d like be a part of the call: http://www.doodle.com/8tz3w6nwc7a63xvd

Best, Matt Tinker, (479-366-8609) #allinthered

Janna Powell (484-695-1204) #allinthered

In my humble opinion, All in the Red is one of the most promising new economic-justice/education groups you can choose to be involved with in the U.S. They are creative & smart & serious about testing innovative organizational tactics. 
  • All in the Red fights for accessible debt-free education for all!
  • Through visionary tactics, surprising actions, and creative networking, we resist corporate ownership of our schools and the commodification of knowledge.
  • By combining artistic and organizational innovations with grassroots direct action, we strive to create dynamic experimental spaces of connectivity and collaboration–incubators for new forms of creative protest.

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Quebec protesters start tour at Ontario universities
July 13, 2012
As the pots and pans take a summer break from the streets of Montreal, leaders of Quebec’s huge, headline-grabbing student protests are in Ontario to share their strategies with 10 universities during a week-long tour that began Thursday night at the University of Ottawa.
One of the panel members is Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, a well-known face of the student movement and spokesperson for CLASSE, the most militant of the student groups involved.
“For us, it’s kind of a responsibility as activists, to share what we have learned,” he says. “There is a lot of curiosity around our capacity to mobilize so many people.”
Nadeau-Dubois, who is only attending the Ottawa event, says there is no reason that students could not stage an effective strike in Ontario — but says, “Ontario students need to find their own reason to fight.”
As in Quebec, that unifying issue could be high tuition fees.
“(Ontario students) have the highest tuition fees in the country. We have seen (an) increase of up to 71 per cent since 2006. We’ve seen a government committed to reducing tuition instead of increasing them this fall,” says Sarah Jayne King, head of the Ontario chapter of the Canadian Federation of Students.
Source

Quebec protesters start tour at Ontario universities

July 13, 2012

As the pots and pans take a summer break from the streets of Montreal, leaders of Quebec’s huge, headline-grabbing student protests are in Ontario to share their strategies with 10 universities during a week-long tour that began Thursday night at the University of Ottawa.

One of the panel members is Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, a well-known face of the student movement and spokesperson for CLASSE, the most militant of the student groups involved.

“For us, it’s kind of a responsibility as activists, to share what we have learned,” he says. “There is a lot of curiosity around our capacity to mobilize so many people.”

Nadeau-Dubois, who is only attending the Ottawa event, says there is no reason that students could not stage an effective strike in Ontario — but says, “Ontario students need to find their own reason to fight.”

As in Quebec, that unifying issue could be high tuition fees.

“(Ontario students) have the highest tuition fees in the country. We have seen (an) increase of up to 71 per cent since 2006. We’ve seen a government committed to reducing tuition instead of increasing them this fall,” says Sarah Jayne King, head of the Ontario chapter of the Canadian Federation of Students.

Source

The case against him in Sweden coincided with the release of these documents and has no basis in fact, if you look at the evidence and the way the Swedish prosecution has run the case. The whole exercise has been set up to smear and silence the truth and those countries with their snouts in the trough with America have fallen into line. Ecuador, whose snout isn’t in the trough, has not fallen into line.
Police Violence Escalates in Israel as Social Justice Movement Reignites 
June 23, 2012
Public Security Minister Yitzhak Aharonovitch should not be allowed to forget these pictures, nor should Police Commissioner Yohanan Danino or Tel Aviv Mayor Ron Huldai (a retired brigadier general): Five police special unit officers – maybe six – drag protest leader Daphne Leef out of a group of demonstrators on Rothschild Blvd. in Tel Aviv and onto the opposite sidewalk.
Leef, in a blue shirt, is thrown to the ground. A few meters away, municipal inspectors and Huldai’s “Green Patrol” help the police push back the protesters. Every few minutes Leef tries to raise her hands and protect herself from the shoves and kicks, to no avail.
In the background, the crowd repeatedly shouts one word: Democracy. This horrific sight lasted for many minutes, until Leef was forcefully taken to a nearby police vehicle. No one should ever ignore or repress these pictures.
If the prospect of a renewed summer social protest needed a little spark to get angry, raging Israelis back on the street, the police’s special unit officers and Huldai’s municipal inspectors generously provided just that; the disproportional use of force against Leef – one woman vs. five-six officers, and later against other protesters – tainted the events on Rotchild. The brutality from above was not only direct, it was public and unabashed.
The 300 activists who remained on the boulevard after the arrests decided on a swift response to counter the silencing of their voices: A protest march on Saturday evening, directed not least at mayor Huldai.
There are more protests planned in the near future, but even the movement’s leaders know that the events of last year cannot repeat themselves. They don’t need to, either, as they will manifest themselves according to today’s reality. The protest is still here, because very little – if at all – has changed since last summer.
Source

Police Violence Escalates in Israel as Social Justice Movement Reignites

June 23, 2012

Public Security Minister Yitzhak Aharonovitch should not be allowed to forget these pictures, nor should Police Commissioner Yohanan Danino or Tel Aviv Mayor Ron Huldai (a retired brigadier general): Five police special unit officers – maybe six – drag protest leader Daphne Leef out of a group of demonstrators on Rothschild Blvd. in Tel Aviv and onto the opposite sidewalk.

Leef, in a blue shirt, is thrown to the ground. A few meters away, municipal inspectors and Huldai’s “Green Patrol” help the police push back the protesters. Every few minutes Leef tries to raise her hands and protect herself from the shoves and kicks, to no avail.

In the background, the crowd repeatedly shouts one word: Democracy. This horrific sight lasted for many minutes, until Leef was forcefully taken to a nearby police vehicle. No one should ever ignore or repress these pictures.

If the prospect of a renewed summer social protest needed a little spark to get angry, raging Israelis back on the street, the police’s special unit officers and Huldai’s municipal inspectors generously provided just that; the disproportional use of force against Leef – one woman vs. five-six officers, and later against other protesters – tainted the events on Rotchild. The brutality from above was not only direct, it was public and unabashed.

The 300 activists who remained on the boulevard after the arrests decided on a swift response to counter the silencing of their voices: A protest march on Saturday evening, directed not least at mayor Huldai.

There are more protests planned in the near future, but even the movement’s leaders know that the events of last year cannot repeat themselves. They don’t need to, either, as they will manifest themselves according to today’s reality. The protest is still here, because very little – if at all – has changed since last summer.

Source

Violent Backlash Against Growing Sudanese Student Movement

June 23, 2012

Sudan’s police force ordered its officers to put an end to the demonstrations “immediately”, state media said, after the protests spread throughout the capital a day earlier expanding beyond the core of student activists initially involved.

Angered by a raft of planned austerity measures meant to tackle the country’s $2.4 billion budget deficit, activists have tried to use discontent over a worsening economic crisis to trigger an “Arab Spring”-style uprising against the government of President Omar Hassan al-Bashir.

Security forces have used teargas and batons to break up the demonstrations, which have taken place in several neighborhoods but have never garnered more than a few hundred people.

On Saturday, the smell of teargas hung in the air and smoke rose from burning tires amid a heavy security presence in the Al-Daim neighborhood, which was also the site of some of the larger protests a day earlier.

A Reuters correspondent saw around 300 to 400 demonstrators, but it was difficult to estimate the total number of protesters as they were scattered in small groups on different streets.

Protests followed the same pattern in the Sajjana neighborhood, where small groups of demonstrators moved through side streets, blocked roads, burned tires and chanted “freedom, freedom”, and “the people want to overthrow the regime”.

In January, last year, similar protests broke out after students in the nation vowed to replicate the Arab Spring that has swept over the Middle East. The government cracked down on those protests harshly too. But with the experience of last year’s social movement, can the people of Sudan turn this movement into something capable of stopping the oppressive Sudanese government? thepeoplesrecord.com will continue to monitor the situation.

Source

28 protesters arrested near Grand Prix in MontrealJune 10, 2012
Organizers of this weekend’s Grand Prix festivities in downtown Montreal saw their worst nightmare play out on Saturday night as protesters and police clashed for two hours along one of the city’s busiest thoroughfares, trapping thousands of revelers in the middle of recurring episodes of chaos.
Police reported a total of 28 arrests.
The night began peacefully around 9 p.m. as a group of about 600 protesters set out from Émilie Gamelin Park near the Berri-UQÀM métro station and made their way west, walking at a brisk pace until they ran into a line of riot police that forced them to turn south. A game of cat and mouse ensued, with officers from both the Sûreté du Québec and the Montreal police force continually blocking access west and pushing the demonstrators further and further south.
At 9:45 p.m., however, the crowd finally managing to dart up toward Ste. Catherine St. W. and into the heart of the Grand Prix party, which at that point was in full swing.
Within minutes, all semblance of order along the already bustling street appeared to collapse.
Traffic ground to a halt and the crowds – party-goers and protesters alike – flooded into the roadway.
Projectiles were thrown at officers and several police vehicles had their windows smashed or were otherwise damaged at the intersection of Ste. Catherine and Crescent Sts.
Police were seen making several targeted arrests within the crowd.
At one point, pepper spray was deployed and a line of riot police advanced on the mass of people who had gathered to watch the confrontation unfold. Panicked, the crowd fled both east and west away from the chaotic scene. One woman was seen cowering behind a jewelry stand. Others could be heard screaming.
Many people, including several children, were overcome by pepper spray that wafted through the air.
Over the next hour, police pushed the crowds back, only to have them advance again several times, ending up right back where the first clash occurred at the entrance to Crescent St. – traditionally the busiest spot downtown during Grand Prix weekend.
Source

28 protesters arrested near Grand Prix in Montreal
June 10, 2012

Organizers of this weekend’s Grand Prix festivities in downtown Montreal saw their worst nightmare play out on Saturday night as protesters and police clashed for two hours along one of the city’s busiest thoroughfares, trapping thousands of revelers in the middle of recurring episodes of chaos.

Police reported a total of 28 arrests.

The night began peacefully around 9 p.m. as a group of about 600 protesters set out from Émilie Gamelin Park near the Berri-UQÀM métro station and made their way west, walking at a brisk pace until they ran into a line of riot police that forced them to turn south. A game of cat and mouse ensued, with officers from both the Sûreté du Québec and the Montreal police force continually blocking access west and pushing the demonstrators further and further south.

At 9:45 p.m., however, the crowd finally managing to dart up toward Ste. Catherine St. W. and into the heart of the Grand Prix party, which at that point was in full swing.

Within minutes, all semblance of order along the already bustling street appeared to collapse.

Traffic ground to a halt and the crowds – party-goers and protesters alike – flooded into the roadway.

Projectiles were thrown at officers and several police vehicles had their windows smashed or were otherwise damaged at the intersection of Ste. Catherine and Crescent Sts.

Police were seen making several targeted arrests within the crowd.

At one point, pepper spray was deployed and a line of riot police advanced on the mass of people who had gathered to watch the confrontation unfold. Panicked, the crowd fled both east and west away from the chaotic scene. One woman was seen cowering behind a jewelry stand. Others could be heard screaming.

Many people, including several children, were overcome by pepper spray that wafted through the air.

Over the next hour, police pushed the crowds back, only to have them advance again several times, ending up right back where the first clash occurred at the entrance to Crescent St. – traditionally the busiest spot downtown during Grand Prix weekend.

Source

Thousands continue to rally in Montreal after failed tuition talksJune 3, 2012
Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Montreal in Canada to protest against a planned tuition fee hike after talks between student groups and Quebec government officials collapsed.
The mass rally, organized by the CLASSE student association, was held on Saturday as thousands of student protesters and their supporters convened at the base of Mount Royal near McGill University in Montreal. The protest was the first since the latest tuition negotiations with Quebec Premier Jean Charest’s government broke down Thursday. CLASSE said some 10,000 people were marching by Saturday late afternoon in the biggest protest since the start of the tuition crisis in February. "It’s to continue to rally and show that we are still motivated even if summer is on its way," CLASSE leader Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois told reporters before the start of the protest. "This isn’t a student strike, it’s a society waking up,” read a banner at the front of the march. 
Source
March on, Quebec!

Thousands continue to rally in Montreal after failed tuition talks
June 3, 2012

Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Montreal in Canada to protest against a planned tuition fee hike after talks between student groups and Quebec government officials collapsed.

The mass rally, organized by the CLASSE student association, was held on Saturday as thousands of student protesters and their supporters convened at the base of Mount Royal near McGill University in Montreal. 

The protest was the first since the latest tuition negotiations with Quebec Premier Jean Charest’s government broke down Thursday. 

CLASSE said some 10,000 people were marching by Saturday late afternoon in the biggest protest since the start of the tuition crisis in February. 

"It’s to continue to rally and show that we are still motivated even if summer is on its way," CLASSE leader Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois told reporters before the start of the protest. "This isn’t a student strike, it’s a society waking up,” read a banner at the front of the march. 

Source

March on, Quebec!

Québec’s Student Strike Turning Into a Citizens’ Revolt
The province of Québec is no stranger to large and powerful social movements (the 1949Asbestos Strike comes to mind, as does the Summit of the Americas in Québec City, in 2001). However, the ongoing conflict between the provincial government and striking students and their supporters will go down in history as one of the province’s - indeed the country’s - biggest mass protests. On its 102nd day, the student movement is growing, as is the awareness of an ever more oppressive and corrupt government.

On May 22, nearly half a million people marched in the streets of Montreal in defiance of a recently adopted law denying protester’s civil liberties, namely the right to protest, freedom of association and of expression. A crowd made up of students, professors, children and citizens from every walk of life marched peacefully throughout the city, ignoring provisions prohibiting any deviation from the planned itinerary and disrupting the commercial and banking district. The crowd openly defied articles of Bill 78, which make any gathering of over 50 protesters illegal, and chanted for the resignation of Premier Jean Charest, who has systematically refused to meet with the students personally. Many consider that the government’s refusal to find a solution and, indeed, its increasingly repressive position have given the movement a second wind.

On Wednesday, May 23, more than 3,000 people assembled in Montreal, in Emilie-Gamelin Square for the 30th nightly protest, while throughout the city, citizens spontaneously took to the streets (in some neighborhoods, over 2,000 people) banging on pots and pans and blocking busy roads, in a situation reminiscent of the Argentinian protests of 2001. No longer just a student strike, the Maple Spring is fast becoming a widespread citizens’ revolt.
Full article

Québec’s Student Strike Turning Into a Citizens’ Revolt

The province of Québec is no stranger to large and powerful social movements (the 1949Asbestos Strike comes to mind, as does the Summit of the Americas in Québec City, in 2001). However, the ongoing conflict between the provincial government and striking students and their supporters will go down in history as one of the province’s - indeed the country’s - biggest mass protests. On its 102nd day, the student movement is growing, as is the awareness of an ever more oppressive and corrupt government.

On May 22, nearly half a million people marched in the streets of Montreal in defiance of a recently adopted law denying protester’s civil liberties, namely the right to protest, freedom of association and of expression. A crowd made up of students, professors, children and citizens from every walk of life marched peacefully throughout the city, ignoring provisions prohibiting any deviation from the planned itinerary and disrupting the commercial and banking district. The crowd openly defied articles of Bill 78, which make any gathering of over 50 protesters illegal, and chanted for the resignation of Premier Jean Charest, who has systematically refused to meet with the students personally. Many consider that the government’s refusal to find a solution and, indeed, its increasingly repressive position have given the movement a second wind.

On Wednesday, May 23, more than 3,000 people assembled in Montreal, in Emilie-Gamelin Square for the 30th nightly protest, while throughout the city, citizens spontaneously took to the streets (in some neighborhoods, over 2,000 people) banging on pots and pans and blocking busy roads, in a situation reminiscent of the Argentinian protests of 2001. No longer just a student strike, the Maple Spring is fast becoming a widespread citizens’ revolt.

Full article