Arab Spring stretches to Sudan amidst new waves of protests
July 04, 2012
While the Egyptians were celebrating the declaration of the name of the first elected president in their history, the young Sudanese were launching their protest against Omar Bashir’s government because of its decision to cut fuel subsidies as part of wider economic austerity measures to rescue the country from chronic economic crisis. The protest first erupted in an impoverished eastern province before reaching some parts of the capital including Khartoum University. As all other Arab regimes have done, Omar al-Bashir’s ordered the police to crack down on the protesters using teargas and batons along with widescale arrest of the protesters as well as some opposition figures. Similarly, al-Bashir followed in the footsteps of the other Arab dictators intending to show the demonstrators partly as outlaws and spies with the official media addressing them as gays. He dismissed the suggestion that the protest was part of the Arab Spring, remarking that the demonstrators were merely a group of agitators whose aims are not shared by the majority of the Sudanese.
The Khartoum government has insisted on continuing with its austerity plans despite the public opposition. Sudan’s finance minister Ali Mahmoud said the government would stick to its decision to cut fuel subsidies regardless of the continued anti-austerity protests in Khartoum and other cities.
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The People’s Record July 4th posts!

Arab Spring stretches to Sudan amidst new waves of protests

July 04, 2012

While the Egyptians were celebrating the declaration of the name of the first elected president in their history, the young Sudanese were launching their protest against Omar Bashir’s government because of its decision to cut fuel subsidies as part of wider economic austerity measures to rescue the country from chronic economic crisis.

The protest first erupted in an impoverished eastern province before reaching some parts of the capital including Khartoum University. As all other Arab regimes have done, Omar al-Bashir’s ordered the police to crack down on the protesters using teargas and batons along with widescale arrest of the protesters as well as some opposition figures.

Similarly, al-Bashir followed in the footsteps of the other Arab dictators intending to show the demonstrators partly as outlaws and spies with the official media addressing them as gays. He dismissed the suggestion that the protest was part of the Arab Spring, remarking that the demonstrators were merely a group of agitators whose aims are not shared by the majority of the Sudanese.

The Khartoum government has insisted on continuing with its austerity plans despite the public opposition. Sudan’s finance minister Ali Mahmoud said the government would stick to its decision to cut fuel subsidies regardless of the continued anti-austerity protests in Khartoum and other cities.

Source (finish the article)

The People’s Record July 4th posts!