This is from Paul D’Amato’s recent article called “Diversity of tactics or unity in action?” on the question of violence as a tactic:
As Ahmed Shawki wrote, in the context of the 2001 mass demonstrations against the G8 summit in Genoa, Italy:

The question of tactics, of violence and nonviolence, must flow from the aims of the movement. The Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky once said that if all it took was to yell “Charge!” in every battle, no matter what the balance of forces is, no matter the terrain, no matter who the enemy is, or no matter who’s on your side, then any idiot can be a revolutionary general. Those who run the system have shown that they will respond violently against our movement. We can’t go around simply talking about doing our own thing and expect that there won’t be a price to pay.

Marxists don’t equate the violence of the oppressor with the violence of the oppressed; the former is overwhelming, widespread and systematic. To expect a purely peaceful social revolution—particularly in the U.S., against what Martin Luther King once called “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today”—is to live in a fantasy world.
But at the same time, we don’t fetishize violence or street fighting. For us, the most important question is how to build a movement that draws into it masses of workers and the oppressed.

This is from Paul D’Amato’s recent article called “Diversity of tactics or unity in action?” on the question of violence as a tactic:

As Ahmed Shawki wrote, in the context of the 2001 mass demonstrations against the G8 summit in Genoa, Italy:

The question of tactics, of violence and nonviolence, must flow from the aims of the movement. The Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky once said that if all it took was to yell “Charge!” in every battle, no matter what the balance of forces is, no matter the terrain, no matter who the enemy is, or no matter who’s on your side, then any idiot can be a revolutionary general. Those who run the system have shown that they will respond violently against our movement. We can’t go around simply talking about doing our own thing and expect that there won’t be a price to pay.

Marxists don’t equate the violence of the oppressor with the violence of the oppressed; the former is overwhelming, widespread and systematic. To expect a purely peaceful social revolution—particularly in the U.S., against what Martin Luther King once called “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today”—is to live in a fantasy world.

But at the same time, we don’t fetishize violence or street fighting. For us, the most important question is how to build a movement that draws into it masses of workers and the oppressed.

This is an amazing article. For anyone who has spent a day at an Occupy encampment, I know you can identify with this narrative. This movement has helped decolonize so many of our minds - we owe it so much! 


Then one day, you hear about the kids sleeping in a park around Wall Street. You’ve been-there-done-that, before you hit the Real World and became focused on your career. You remember activism fondly and hope the kids have fun and make some cool signs, or enjoy letting their body hair grow long, or make some bankers feel bad about themselves. You shrug. You are doing your part to get by: you are shopping at the farmer’s market, you read Chomsky, you even criticize The New York Times. You do yoga. Your online dating profile reflects your ambivalence toward the bourgeois, heteronormative standard of romance while clearly expressing that you are available for drinks with a good-looking so-and-so of a certain pedigree who has the same excellent taste that you do. Everything is going just fine.
But then curiosity gets the best of you, and anyway Radiohead is rumored to be playing. They don’t show, and instead, you find yourself in the General Assembly. People are talking about the possibility of a new society and screaming “mic check!” and wearing strange costumes, and the food is great, and you start seeing people you know. And you remember liking those people at the time you knew them, but not actually knowing them very well. And a week later, one of them sends you a text message, saying to come to the park now, there’s a march, and he doesn’t have anyone around him and is afraid of being arrested. 


Read the whole article (its really good). 

This is an amazing article. For anyone who has spent a day at an Occupy encampment, I know you can identify with this narrative. This movement has helped decolonize so many of our minds - we owe it so much! 

Then one day, you hear about the kids sleeping in a park around Wall Street. You’ve been-there-done-that, before you hit the Real World and became focused on your career. You remember activism fondly and hope the kids have fun and make some cool signs, or enjoy letting their body hair grow long, or make some bankers feel bad about themselves. You shrug. You are doing your part to get by: you are shopping at the farmer’s market, you read Chomsky, you even criticize The New York Times. You do yoga. Your online dating profile reflects your ambivalence toward the bourgeois, heteronormative standard of romance while clearly expressing that you are available for drinks with a good-looking so-and-so of a certain pedigree who has the same excellent taste that you do. Everything is going just fine.

But then curiosity gets the best of you, and anyway Radiohead is rumored to be playing. They don’t show, and instead, you find yourself in the General Assembly. People are talking about the possibility of a new society and screaming “mic check!” and wearing strange costumes, and the food is great, and you start seeing people you know. And you remember liking those people at the time you knew them, but not actually knowing them very well. And a week later, one of them sends you a text message, saying to come to the park now, there’s a march, and he doesn’t have anyone around him and is afraid of being arrested. 

Read the whole article (its really good). 

What have we done in three months?
This Movement just recently had its three month anniversary. Three months ago most American citizens wouldn’t have known what you meant if you talked about “the 1%” or “the 99%”. Vibrant communities of resistance did not exist in nearly every large city (and many more in smaller communities) in the United States and globally. Many of us had less radical (less educated) political/economic understandings. Many of us had never been involved in any sort of organized protest before. Many of us had a more naive outlook about our media, our police departments and our local city governments. Make no mistake, in just three months this movement has changed everything and it is still in its infancy. 
In just three months…
Thousands protested against big banks & switched to local credit unions on November 5. 
Gov. Cuomo (NY) negotiates a tax increase to those in higher brackets, saving $2 billion in tax cuts on December 5. 
Occupiers shut down ports in Oakland, Long Beach, Seattle, Vancouver, Portland, Houston, Longview & other ports on December 12.
Police responses to the Occupy Movement recorded on cell phones and shared over the internet focused attention on police brutality.
The movement focused protests on tuition hikes, especially in New York City & public universities in California.
We’ve landed the cover of TIME magazine for Person of the Year on December 14. 
The protests have shifted American media back into the hands of the people instead of mainstream media outlets with corporate interests.
…not bad for just three months. 
 -R.Cunningham

What have we done in three months?

This Movement just recently had its three month anniversary. Three months ago most American citizens wouldn’t have known what you meant if you talked about “the 1%” or “the 99%”. Vibrant communities of resistance did not exist in nearly every large city (and many more in smaller communities) in the United States and globally. Many of us had less radical (less educated) political/economic understandings. Many of us had never been involved in any sort of organized protest before. Many of us had a more naive outlook about our media, our police departments and our local city governments. Make no mistake, in just three months this movement has changed everything and it is still in its infancy. 

In just three months…

  • Thousands protested against big banks & switched to local credit unions on November 5. 
  • Gov. Cuomo (NY) negotiates a tax increase to those in higher brackets, saving $2 billion in tax cuts on December 5. 
  • Occupiers shut down ports in Oakland, Long Beach, Seattle, Vancouver, Portland, Houston, Longview & other ports on December 12.
  • Police responses to the Occupy Movement recorded on cell phones and shared over the internet focused attention on police brutality.
  • The movement focused protests on tuition hikes, especially in New York City & public universities in California.
  • We’ve landed the cover of TIME magazine for Person of the Year on December 14. 
  • The protests have shifted American media back into the hands of the people instead of mainstream media outlets with corporate interests.

…not bad for just three months. 

 -R.Cunningham

A huge accomplishment for the Occupy Movement has been changing people’s mind about media literacy. After witnessing who was covering the brutality & arrests & who was not, Americans can really see that mainstream media outlets are owned by corporations whose interests they need to protect. 
Rethink where you get your news - is a media conglomerate behind what you read in headlines & what you see on front pages? 

A huge accomplishment for the Occupy Movement has been changing people’s mind about media literacy. After witnessing who was covering the brutality & arrests & who was not, Americans can really see that mainstream media outlets are owned by corporations whose interests they need to protect. 

Rethink where you get your news - is a media conglomerate behind what you read in headlines & what you see on front pages? 

anarcho-queer
occupyallstreets:

An Occupy Oakland protestor moves a tent into place at a new encampment at a foreclosed property on November 22, 2011 in Oakland, California. About a dozen Occupy Oakland protestors set up an encampment on the grassy area of a foreclosed property after Oakland police shut down three different Occupy encampments over the past week, including the biggest one - at Frank Ogawa Plaza in front of Oakland City Hall.(Source)

Already we can see how the Occupy Movement is evolving. First occupying Zuccotti, it caught fire in other cities across the country then across the world. After evictions & brutality, it’s now working at a more local level to the solve problems caused by corporate greed. Occupy Homes is another step toward the activism the movement has sparked. 

occupyallstreets:

An Occupy Oakland protestor moves a tent into place at a new encampment at a foreclosed property on November 22, 2011 in Oakland, California. About a dozen Occupy Oakland protestors set up an encampment on the grassy area of a foreclosed property after Oakland police shut down three different Occupy encampments over the past week, including the biggest one - at Frank Ogawa Plaza in front of Oakland City Hall.

(Source)

Already we can see how the Occupy Movement is evolving. First occupying Zuccotti, it caught fire in other cities across the country then across the world. After evictions & brutality, it’s now working at a more local level to the solve problems caused by corporate greed. Occupy Homes is another step toward the activism the movement has sparked. 

dishabillic
Our struggle will prevail once we begin not only to deplore or condemn but also to interrupt the mechanisms that exploit the labour and resources of the immense majority. When workers withhold their labour or take control of their workplace, when the unemployed refuse the exclusion to which they are condemned, when students refuse to pay their fees and debts, when immigrants rebel against discrimination, when householders defend their homes against foreclosure – when civil disobedience and noncompliance acquires a depth and scale that no police operation can break – then the fundamental isolation of the tendential 1% will be exposed for all to see.
occupationtv

occupationtv:

Occupy Our Homes - Join us December 6th for the national launch of Occupy Our Homes. For more info, visit OccupyOurHomes.org. 


To share your story, visit HousingisaHumanRight.org or call toll-free (888) 955-6653.

On December 6th Occupy Wall Street will join in solidarity with a Brooklyn community to re-occupy a foreclosed home. The day of action marks a national kick-off for a new frontier for the occupy movement: the liberation of vacant bank-owned homes for those in need. The banks got bailed out, but our families are getting kicked out. The fight to reclaim democracy from the banks is growing from Wall Street to Main Street.

The NYC foreclosure tour and home re-occupation is part of a big national day of action on Dec. 6 that will focus on the foreclosure crisis and protest fraudulent lending practices, corrupt securitization, and illegal evictions by banks. The Occupy movement actions, including eviction defense at foreclosed properties, takeovers of vacant properties by homeless families, and foreclosure action disruptions, will take place in more than 25 cities across the country.

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