288 protesters detained at anti-police brutality march in Montreal
March 16, 2014

Police gave protesters at the annual demonstration against police brutality just minutes before the riot squad encircled the crowd and detained 288 people on Saturday.

Lines of riot police blocked the streets around the protest at Jean-Talon St. and Chateaubriand Ave., funnelling protesters to the south down Chateaubriand, where they were immediately encircled.

The protesters were charged under municipal bylaw P-6, which requires organizers of a protest to provide their itinerary to police.

Two people suffered minor injuries during the police intervention, police spokesperson Ian Lafrenière said.  

The protest began under a heavy police presence, including cavalry, a helicopter and dozens of riot police from the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal and the Sûreté du Québec.

“It was a veritable army of police … who occupied the area surrounding the Jean-Talon métro when the protest was to start,” the Collective Opposed to Police Brutality, which organizes the annual protest, said in a written statement issued after the protest.

The COBP organized this year’s march to protest what it called “social cleansing” of homeless and marginalized citizens by police.

“The COBP denounces the fact that the SPVM has yet again demonstrated that it is incapable of tolerating protests against its brutality and police impunity,” the organization said.

The police had a different view.

“They refused to share their itinerary, and they refused to give us any details. When we got there, we asked them not to jump onto the street, and they answered by going into the street and yelling at us that they were not cooperating,” Lafrenière said. (LOL)

Police made several arrests over the next few hours as small groups of protesters moved through the neighbourhood, occasionally blocking traffic.

“The reason we apply P-6 is to prevent problems. In a case like this, with the history that we have — that protest has been going on for 18 years and unfortunately 15 years of that it went wrong,” Lafrenière said.

In past years, the protest has often devolved into vandalism and rioting, but this year police reported only two major acts of mischief. Both a police van and a CBC/Radio-Canada truck were damaged and spray-painted.

“We are still conducting investigations in regard to the mischief,” Lafrenière said.

The 288 people detained under bylaw P-6 will receive a ticket for participating in an illegal protest.

“It looks good in the media — the police can say (all of these) people were arrested, were breaking windows and stuff, but it’s not true. They were doing nothing,” said Claudine Lamothe, who narrowly escaped arrest when police surrounded the demonstration.

The first arrested protesters were released after about an hour, while others were still in police custody and waiting to be processed as of 7 p.m. The four who may face criminal charges will be held for longer, Lafrenière said.

Tamim Sujat, a McGill student and photo editor at The McGill Daily, one of the university’s campus newspapers, was among the group arrested at the beginning of the protest.

“(The police) said ‘You’re not supposed to be loitering around with cameras where you’re not supposed to be,’” Sujat said.

Sujat said he plans to contest the $638 fine with the help of the newspaper’s lawyer. Police did not recognize his student press credentials, he added.

“They said the only thing we can do is let you out before other people,” Sujat said. 

Source

The Turkish Uprising: What’s happening in Turkey right now
March 14, 2014

A fresh new wave of protests is rocking Turkey, as tens of thousands march on the streets to demonstrate against the government. But unlike what’s going on in Ukraine and Venezuela, the protests in Turkey mark a second, renewed round of protests that began last summer. 

Protests began with the death of a teenager named Berkin Elvan, who was in a nine-month coma after being injured during last year’s government rallies. Thousands attended his funeral in Istanbul and marched in the streets afterwards.

Tens of thousands are also protesting across Turkey, especially in big cities such as Ankara and Izmir. 

The government’s response has been to send riot police to clash with the protesters. The tactics have mostly been restricted to tear gas, water cannons and beatings. It seems that police may have forgotten that’s how Elvan died — he suffered a head injury when he was hit in the head with a tear gas canister. He was passing by the protests to go buy bread for his family.

On Wednesday, a protester died from a head injury while a police officer also passed away from a heart attack.

Around 36 children were arrested in Ankara for protesting on the streets. Over a hundred people were also arrested in Izmir. Students across the country are also organizing school boycotts and sit-ins.

Elvan’s death marks the eighth casualty resulting from last year’s protests. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has yet to comment on Elvan’s death.

Protests began last year over the development of Gezi Park in Istanbul, although it quickly spread into a widespread anti-government demonstration.

Turkey will hold local elections on Mar. 30. Erdogan has promised to step down if his ruling AK Party loses power.

Source

zahgurim
queernessandlatkes:

#Justice4Cecily Dance Dance Revolution! Solidarity Party (link to Facebook event)
Hey Tumblr, there’s a really important event/party happening this Saturday (3/1/2014) in Brooklyn. Please reblog and attend if you’re able! Even if you don’t live in NYC, pass this along to any friends or followers who do. If you see this post after Saturday, please keep reblogging because Cecily’s trial begins on Monday 3/3 and will continue until 3/10. We need people to show up in court to show their support for Cecily, so this needs to be spread until then. If you’re interested in signing up to come to court, you can RSVP on www.justiceforcecily.com. (Also, it’d be great if you could tag it with anything relevant that’ll help more people see this!)
Cecily McMillan is an activist and grad student who was brutally sexually and physically assaulted by police officers on the 6-month anniversary of Occupy Wall Street. When Cecily felt her right breast being grabbed from behind, she involuntarily swung her elbow back and hit her attacker in the face. It turns out that the person who groped her was an NYPD police officer, so Cecily is now being charged as a felon and is facing up to 7 years in jail for “assaulting a police officer.” When Cecily struck the officer, he and other officers attacked her until she was badly bruised, knocked unconscious and seizing. Although there is video footage of several police officers kicking Cecily as she laid unconscious on the ground, it is she who is being sued and could go to jail because she was attacked.
The event on Saturday will be a dance party (with DJs, live musicians, food and beer/wine for those over 21) and also with social justice components. There will be a space for people to write down and share their experiences with police brutality. There will be a table with zines and folks are invited to hang up posters for upcoming political/activist/leftist/queer events! Hopefully, we’ll also have computers so anyone who’s interested in supporting Cecily in court can sign up for shifts at the party. 
Hope to see you on Saturday and/or in court in the following weeks!
To learn more about Cecily and her trial:www.justiceforcecily.com (Official website)
http://www.democracynow.org/2012/3/23/exclusive_ows_activist_cecily_mcmillan_describes (Video interview immediately following the incident)
http://justiceforcecily.com/media/ (Comprehensive list of articles and videos about Cecily)
http://www.policymic.com/articles/82123/this-occupy-activist-could-go-to-prison-for-standing-up-to-the-cop-who-grabbed-her-breast (Trigger warning: somewhat graphic images of bruises)
How you can help:
Attend the party on Saturday 3/1! This is an opportunity to do something great and have fun at the same time. There is a $5 suggested donation (although no one will be turned away for lack of funds.) Please show up if you can—we’d like to see as many of you there as possible! (FB event)
Sign up to attend court any time from 3/3-3/10. It’s critical to show the judge, jury and the media that we all stand with Cecily. We’re hoping to pack the court room to capacity, with 100 people every day! For more information and to RSVP, click here. You can also find the Facebook event for the trial here: 
If you don’t live in NY: Sign this petition to ask the NY District Attorney to drop all charges against Cecily. After you sign it’ll prompt you to tweet at the DA if you want (but you don’t have to)
Spread the word!! Reblog this post, share articles and events on Facebook, and reach out to people you know, especially in the NYC area. Share Cecily’s story.

queernessandlatkes:

#Justice4Cecily Dance Dance Revolution! Solidarity Party 
(link to Facebook event)

Hey Tumblr, there’s a really important event/party happening this Saturday (3/1/2014) in Brooklyn. Please reblog and attend if you’re able! Even if you don’t live in NYC, pass this along to any friends or followers who do. If you see this post after Saturday, please keep reblogging because Cecily’s trial begins on Monday 3/3 and will continue until 3/10. We need people to show up in court to show their support for Cecily, so this needs to be spread until then. If you’re interested in signing up to come to court, you can RSVP on www.justiceforcecily.com. (Also, it’d be great if you could tag it with anything relevant that’ll help more people see this!)

Cecily McMillan is an activist and grad student who was brutally sexually and physically assaulted by police officers on the 6-month anniversary of Occupy Wall Street. When Cecily felt her right breast being grabbed from behind, she involuntarily swung her elbow back and hit her attacker in the face. It turns out that the person who groped her was an NYPD police officer, so Cecily is now being charged as a felon and is facing up to 7 years in jail for “assaulting a police officer.” When Cecily struck the officer, he and other officers attacked her until she was badly bruised, knocked unconscious and seizing. Although there is video footage of several police officers kicking Cecily as she laid unconscious on the ground, it is she who is being sued and could go to jail because she was attacked.

The event on Saturday will be a dance party (with DJs, live musicians, food and beer/wine for those over 21) and also with social justice components. There will be a space for people to write down and share their experiences with police brutality. There will be a table with zines and folks are invited to hang up posters for upcoming political/activist/leftist/queer events! Hopefully, we’ll also have computers so anyone who’s interested in supporting Cecily in court can sign up for shifts at the party. 

Hope to see you on Saturday and/or in court in the following weeks!

To learn more about Cecily and her trial:
www.justiceforcecily.com 
(Official website)

http://www.democracynow.org/2012/3/23/exclusive_ows_activist_cecily_mcmillan_describes 
(Video interview immediately following the incident)

http://justiceforcecily.com/media/ 
(Comprehensive list of articles and videos about Cecily)

http://www.policymic.com/articles/82123/this-occupy-activist-could-go-to-prison-for-standing-up-to-the-cop-who-grabbed-her-breast 
(Trigger warning: somewhat graphic images of bruises)

How you can help:

  • Attend the party on Saturday 3/1! This is an opportunity to do something great and have fun at the same time. There is a $5 suggested donation (although no one will be turned away for lack of funds.) Please show up if you can—we’d like to see as many of you there as possible! (FB event)

  • Sign up to attend court any time from 3/3-3/10. It’s critical to show the judge, jury and the media that we all stand with Cecily. We’re hoping to pack the court room to capacity, with 100 people every day! For more information and to RSVP, click here. You can also find the Facebook event for the trial here

  • If you don’t live in NY: Sign this petition to ask the NY District Attorney to drop all charges against Cecily. After you sign it’ll prompt you to tweet at the DA if you want (but you don’t have to)

  • Spread the word!! Reblog this post, share articles and events on Facebook, and reach out to people you know, especially in the NYC area. Share Cecily’s story.
anarcho-queer

anarcho-queer:

Protesters Disrupt Police Review Board Meeting On Anniversary Of Kayla Moore’s Death

On the evening of February 12th, a small crowd gathered outside Gaia Apartments in downtown Berkeley to demand answers regarding the death of Kayla Moore, a black transgender woman who was killed by six Berkeley police officers in the apartment at the beginning of 2013.

The vigil and march was only the most recent action in a year-long campaign by Berkeley Copwatch and Kayla’s family after BPD refused to release the details of her death, which occurred after a ‘mental health evaluation’ ended in six BPD officers pinning her to the mattress and suffocating her.

None of the seven police officers present, all of whom are trained in emergency first aid, performed mouth-to–mouth resuscitation on Moore, which would have assisted her, because they considered her transgender status as something objectionable.

Kayla was detained by police for an outstanding San Francisco warrant they discovered for a Xavier Moore. While Kayla’s birth name was Xavier, the warrant described a man in his 60s, Moore was only 41 and should not have been mistaken for the other Moore, according to a lawsuit against the police.

The meeting was stormed by participants in the angry march as they shouted “Cops! Pigs! Murderers!” and took over the hearing to speak about Kayla’s murder and the review board’s inaction in investigation.

The board, of course, announced that they couldn’t tell Kayla’s family anything yet, but that the inquiry process was entering a second stage, which consists of a secret meeting at a secret time in which all of the officers would be interviewed and none of the transcripts would be publicly available.

The crowd berated officers and review board members and interrupted the meeting until it was over, but ultimately knew that the board had no intention of helping Kayla’s family get any answers. Berkeley Copwatch, however, is committed to continuing to help the Moore family get as many details as possible about Kayla’s death.

TW: Sexual assault, police violence - Woman ejected from moving LAPD car says cop was sexually assaulting her

January 12, 2014

A 27-year-old Los Angeles pharmacist has sued the Los Angeles Police Department over injuries she sustained when she was thrown from a moving squad car. The New York Daily News reported that Kim Nguyen says she fell from the car as she struggled to escape sexual assault by a police officer.

“He was grabbing my left inner thigh, trying to — I’m assuming — opening my legs,” she said in her deposition about the incident.

Horrifying surveillance video shows a half-naked Nguyen tumbling from the police car into the street. She was badly injured and only regained consciousness when she emerged from a six-day medically induced coma.

Her injuries included a badly broken jaw, a brain concussion and soft tissue injuries all over her body.

The nightmare began when she and two male friends were waiting for a cab at 2:00 a.m. outside a restaurant in Los Angeles. The trio, Nguyen said, had been drinking.

A squad car pulled up to the curb and officers handcuffed her and bundled her into the back seat, saying she was being arrested for public intoxication. The car pulled away from the curb without either of Nguyen’s companions.

According to Nguyen’s deposition, one officer remained in the back seat of the squad car. He fondled her chest and yanked her head around by the ears before pulling up her skirt and trying to force her legs open.

It was then, she said, that the door behind her abruptly swung open and she was thrown from the vehicle.

Her attorney Arnoldo Cassillas said to KCAL that his client spent two weeks in the hospital with her jaw wired shut. All of her teeth were shattered in the fall and had to be pulled. She is suing for criminal negligence.

The LAPD told KCAL that it does not comment on pending litigation.

Source

Brazil: FIFA forces evictions for World Cup parking lot, police brutality rages
January 9, 2014

A dozen houses in the Mangueira slums of Rio de Janeiro have been demolished, and residents have been removed at gun point by the government of Brazil in order to build a parking lot for the upcoming World Cup.

People who were living in these homes were targeted by militarized riot cops, sent in by the government to push them into the streets. They were not even allowed to gather their personal belongings.

Impoverished residents were forcefully evicted in large numbers by the government: the riot cops even threatened to kill children in their mothers’ arms.

This video shows even more brutality: cops teargassing women for simply passing by; riot cops repeatedly attacking locals, throwing teargas grenades into their homes or aiming straight at them, and terrorizing and bullying defenseless people on the streets.

Riot cops are an occupying force, while people from Brazil fight FIFA and their government for targeted attacks on indigenous people, pregnant women and black people.

Faced with another episode of brutal oppression in the name of the World Cup and FIFA (an organisation which has kept silent about crimes, and racist/social abuses committed by the government of Brazil), activists from Rio de Janeiro organised to help people in the slums resist the governments violent gentrification attack.

Source
Photos

Cop allegedly said ‘We don’t have time for this’ before shooting schizophrenic teen to death

TW: Police murder
January 7, 2014

Schizophrenic 18-year-old Keith Vidal was having an episode on Sunday when his parents called the police for assistance. Instead, an officer shot and killed their son right in front of them.

During Sunday’s incident, Vidal had apparently picked up a small screwdriver — small enough that it couldn’t have caused serious harm, his family says, but enough that they sought law enforcement assistance. Three different police departments’ officers arrived at the scene. The first two were able to restrain Vidal and calm him down, according to Vidal’s father. But then a third entered, and that’s when he says things went sour.

He says the third officer tased Vidal, knocking the 90-pound teenager to the ground. The officer then allegedly stepped forward with a firearm and said, “we don’t have time for this,” before shooting the teen dead.

Southport Police Department, one of the three North Carolina agencies that responded to the call, has put one of its detectives on administrative leave in relation to the case, reports WECT. The department did not say whether the officer was the one who had fired the weapon. The other departments, Boiling Spring Lakes PD and the Brunswick County Sheriff’s office, said that they have not put their responding officers on leave. The State Bureau of Investigation is looking into the incident.

Sadly, families often treat police officers as assistants in home disputes or conflicts. But law enforcement officials have a long history of turning heated situations deadly. Protocol for police who take out their guns is to aim for the head or chest, and that’s exactly what the officer did in this case.

Too often, the mentally ill are on the other end of the barrel. Just last month, police fired 15-20 rounds at a schizophrenic man who they mistook for drunk, killing him. The month before that, in a similar incident to Vidal’s, a mentally ill man carrying a shovel was gunned down by police after his mother called them for help calming him down.

“This is what’s wrong with our mental health system,” Vidal’s mother, who was reportedly treated at the scene for an emotional breakdown, told reporters.

Source

Durham Police Chief claims teen died from self-inflicted gun wound while handcuffedDecember 12, 2013
A Durham teen died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez said Wednesday afternoon at a news conference.
Lopez held a 3 p.m. news conference and started by extending condolences to the family of Jesus Huerta, who died in a police cruiser in November. Huerta was 17.
He said the noise heard by the officer was a gunshot, and said it was a gunshot wound to the head.
Lopez said a handgun was found in the car and that Huerta was still handcuffed from behind. He said the wound was self-inflicted.
"The medical examiner’s office has confirmed that Jesus Huerta died from a gunshot wound to his head," Lopez said. "Whether that wound was accidental or intentional is unknown at this time."
Lopez said Huerta was searched, and police are not sure where how he had the weapon.
"I know that it is hard for people not in law enforcement to understand how someone could be capable of shooting themselves while handcuffed behind the back," Lopez said. "While incidents like this are not common, they unfortunately have happened in other jurisdictions in the past."
Huerta’s family released a statement following the press conference held by Lopez. The family of Huerta said the press conference did not release any new information to the public.
"How did Jesús end up dead in the parking lot at police headquarters in these circumstances?  Searched.  Handcuffed behind the back.  How is it even possible to shoot oneself?" the statement reads.
The family of Huerta also requested all forms of communication “received, sent, possessed or created by any City of Durham employee and/or city official (including but not limited to the police chief, command staff, city manager, police public relations/press staff) that touch upon or concern the detention, arrest, death and all investigations concerning Jesús Huerta.”
Lopez said the SBI is continuing their investigation into the incident for any possible criminal violations, which is standard procedure
Source

Durham Police Chief claims teen died from self-inflicted gun wound while handcuffed
December 12, 2013

A Durham teen died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez said Wednesday afternoon at a news conference.

Lopez held a 3 p.m. news conference and started by extending condolences to the family of Jesus Huerta, who died in a police cruiser in November. Huerta was 17.

He said the noise heard by the officer was a gunshot, and said it was a gunshot wound to the head.

Lopez said a handgun was found in the car and that Huerta was still handcuffed from behind. He said the wound was self-inflicted.

"The medical examiner’s office has confirmed that Jesus Huerta died from a gunshot wound to his head," Lopez said. "Whether that wound was accidental or intentional is unknown at this time."

Lopez said Huerta was searched, and police are not sure where how he had the weapon.

"I know that it is hard for people not in law enforcement to understand how someone could be capable of shooting themselves while handcuffed behind the back," Lopez said. "While incidents like this are not common, they unfortunately have happened in other jurisdictions in the past."

Huerta’s family released a statement following the press conference held by Lopez. The family of Huerta said the press conference did not release any new information to the public.

"How did Jesús end up dead in the parking lot at police headquarters in these circumstances?  Searched.  Handcuffed behind the back.  How is it even possible to shoot oneself?" the statement reads.

The family of Huerta also requested all forms of communication “received, sent, possessed or created by any City of Durham employee and/or city official (including but not limited to the police chief, command staff, city manager, police public relations/press staff) that touch upon or concern the detention, arrest, death and all investigations concerning Jesús Huerta.”

Lopez said the SBI is continuing their investigation into the incident for any possible criminal violations, which is standard procedure

Source

London’s biggest university bans student protestsDecember 9, 2013
The University of London - a body representing London universities including University College London, the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), Birkbeck and the London School of Economics - has banned protests on its campus for the next six months.
Students who hold sit-in protests in an area in Holborn, central London, including the Senate House, the student union building, and the buildings of SOAS and Birkbeck, can be imprisoned.
The president of the University of London student union, Michael Chessum, told Channel 4 News it was a “draconian” reaction and “a sign that the university had lost the argument”.
The court order obtained on the 4 December by the University of London bans “occupational protest” in the area for the next six months. Anyone breaching the order can be charged with contempt of court.
Chris Cobb, Chief Operating Officer at the University of London said: “This is a regrettable but necessary step that we have taken in order to prevent the type of violent and intimidating behaviour that we have seen by protesters at Senate House recently.”
Protest ‘ended in violence’
The University of London obtained the court order just after a sit-in protest at the student union on the 4 and 5 December. It was ended by police in violent scenes which resulted in 41 arrests. So far one protester has been charged with common assault, and the remaining 40, including three members of the union leadership, have been released on bail pending further investigations.
The protest had a series of demands calling for the university to pay sick pay to cleaners and asking the university to take a stand on the “marketisation” of higher education. It was supported but not organised by the student union.
The Metropolitan Police said that three police officers suffered minor injuries in the events that unfurled on the 4 December. The Met described what happened that evening this way: “The officers became aware of a large group, of up to 300 people, gathered and making their way along Malet Street. Some had their faces covered, others carrying home made shields. Smoke bombs and other unknown objects were thrown at police.”
Mr Chessum said that police behaviour in dispersing the protest was “at a level of violence beyond anything I’d ever seen before.”
Mr Chessum described the behaviour of some officers and security guards as “like a pub brawl”. He said: “I’ve seen people having their teeth punched out. The police were not turning up with horses and batons they were just swinging punches.”
An official statement from the student union reported violent scenes: “Initial reports indicate that protesters were assaulted by both police and security: thrown to the ground, kicked and punched, and dragged to the ground by their hair. When supporters gathered outside to show support for the occupation, they were beaten back and assaulted.”
Mr Chessum said that the union were also looking into the role that university security staff and administrators played in ending the protest. The union were compiling evidence with a view to making complaints he said.
The police said they have received no complaints regarding the behaviour of officers from anyone involved in this week’s protests and so are not investigating anything. But they have added that they will review what happened.
"As with all large public order incidents, a range of material will now be subject to review in order to establish the full facts," a statement said.
Source

London’s biggest university bans student protests
December 9, 2013

The University of London - a body representing London universities including University College London, the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), Birkbeck and the London School of Economics - has banned protests on its campus for the next six months.

Students who hold sit-in protests in an area in Holborn, central London, including the Senate House, the student union building, and the buildings of SOAS and Birkbeck, can be imprisoned.

The president of the University of London student union, Michael Chessum, told Channel 4 News it was a “draconian” reaction and “a sign that the university had lost the argument”.

The court order obtained on the 4 December by the University of London bans “occupational protest” in the area for the next six months. Anyone breaching the order can be charged with contempt of court.

Chris Cobb, Chief Operating Officer at the University of London said: “This is a regrettable but necessary step that we have taken in order to prevent the type of violent and intimidating behaviour that we have seen by protesters at Senate House recently.”

Protest ‘ended in violence’

The University of London obtained the court order just after a sit-in protest at the student union on the 4 and 5 December. It was ended by police in violent scenes which resulted in 41 arrests. So far one protester has been charged with common assault, and the remaining 40, including three members of the union leadership, have been released on bail pending further investigations.

The protest had a series of demands calling for the university to pay sick pay to cleaners and asking the university to take a stand on the “marketisation” of higher education. It was supported but not organised by the student union.

The Metropolitan Police said that three police officers suffered minor injuries in the events that unfurled on the 4 December. The Met described what happened that evening this way: “The officers became aware of a large group, of up to 300 people, gathered and making their way along Malet Street. Some had their faces covered, others carrying home made shields. Smoke bombs and other unknown objects were thrown at police.”

Mr Chessum said that police behaviour in dispersing the protest was “at a level of violence beyond anything I’d ever seen before.”

Mr Chessum described the behaviour of some officers and security guards as “like a pub brawl”. He said: “I’ve seen people having their teeth punched out. The police were not turning up with horses and batons they were just swinging punches.”

An official statement from the student union reported violent scenes: “Initial reports indicate that protesters were assaulted by both police and security: thrown to the ground, kicked and punched, and dragged to the ground by their hair. When supporters gathered outside to show support for the occupation, they were beaten back and assaulted.”

Mr Chessum said that the union were also looking into the role that university security staff and administrators played in ending the protest. The union were compiling evidence with a view to making complaints he said.

The police said they have received no complaints regarding the behaviour of officers from anyone involved in this week’s protests and so are not investigating anything. But they have added that they will review what happened.

"As with all large public order incidents, a range of material will now be subject to review in order to establish the full facts," a statement said.

Source

Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its historyDecember 5, 2013
It was an unprecedented headline in Iceland this week — a man shot to death by police.
"The nation was in shock. This does not happen in our country," said Thora Arnorsdottir, news editor at RUV, the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service. 
She was referring to a 59-year old man who was shot by police on Monday. The man, who started shooting at police when they entered his building, had a history of mental illness. 
It’s the first time someone has been killed by armed police in Iceland since it became an independent republic in 1944. Police don’t even carry weapons, usually. Violent crime in Iceland is almost non-existent.
"The nation does not want its police force to carry weapons because it’s dangerous, it’s threatening," Arnorsdottir says. "It’s a part of the culture. Guns are used to go hunting as a sport, but you never see a gun."
In fact, Iceland isn’t anti-gun. In terms of per-capita gun ownership, Iceland ranks 15th in the world. Still, this incident was so rare that neighbors of the man shot were comparing the shooting to a scene from an American film. 
The Icelandic police department said officers involved will go through grief counseling. And the police department has already apologized to the family of the man who died — though not necessarily because they did anything wrong.
"I think it’s respectful," Arnorsdottir says, “because no one wants to take another person’s life. “
There are still a number of questions to be answered, including why police didn’t first try to negotiate with man before entering his building.
"A part of the great thing of living in this country is that you can enter parliament and the only thing they ask you to do is to turn off your cellphone, so you don’t disturb the parliamentarians while they’re talking. We do not have armed guards following our prime minister or president. That’s a part of the great thing of living in a peaceful society. We do not want to change that. " 
Source

Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its history
December 5, 2013

It was an unprecedented headline in Iceland this week — a man shot to death by police.

"The nation was in shock. This does not happen in our country," said Thora Arnorsdottir, news editor at RUV, the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service. 

She was referring to a 59-year old man who was shot by police on Monday. The man, who started shooting at police when they entered his building, had a history of mental illness. 

It’s the first time someone has been killed by armed police in Iceland since it became an independent republic in 1944. Police don’t even carry weapons, usually. Violent crime in Iceland is almost non-existent.

"The nation does not want its police force to carry weapons because it’s dangerous, it’s threatening," Arnorsdottir says. "It’s a part of the culture. Guns are used to go hunting as a sport, but you never see a gun."

In fact, Iceland isn’t anti-gun. In terms of per-capita gun ownership, Iceland ranks 15th in the world. Still, this incident was so rare that neighbors of the man shot were comparing the shooting to a scene from an American film. 

The Icelandic police department said officers involved will go through grief counseling. And the police department has already apologized to the family of the man who died — though not necessarily because they did anything wrong.

"I think it’s respectful," Arnorsdottir says, “because no one wants to take another person’s life. “

There are still a number of questions to be answered, including why police didn’t first try to negotiate with man before entering his building.

"A part of the great thing of living in this country is that you can enter parliament and the only thing they ask you to do is to turn off your cellphone, so you don’t disturb the parliamentarians while they’re talking. We do not have armed guards following our prime minister or president. That’s a part of the great thing of living in a peaceful society. We do not want to change that. " 

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Community recounts fatal police shooting of Santa Rosa teen Andy Lopez
October 29, 2013

We’re learning more in the ongoing investigation of a Sonoma County sheriff’s deputy who shot and killed a 13-year old who was carrying a replica assault rifle.

The collection of candles and balloons honoring Andy Lopez continues to grow and people continue to show up to pay their respects. Maria Marquez and Juana Rojas have attended the memorial every day since the shooting because they want to tell the boy’s parents what they saw when he was killed.

"Y nosotros nos venimos detras de la patrulla hasta aqui, el estop," Rojas said.

She says they were right behind the patrol car at a stop sign. Rojas saw the deputies turn on their police lights, then drive over to where the teenager was standing in an open lot.

Rojas and Marquez say they heard the deputies yell in english “drop the gun.”

"Abrieron la puerta de cada lado y sacaron la pistola y tas, tas," Rojas said.

She says almost immediately, both deputies then opened their doors and shots were fired.

Rojas and Marquez say deputies only yelled once before opening fire.

"Imediatamente le dispararon, no le dieron oportunidad de nada," Marquez said.

She says they fired immediately and didn’t give him a chance to do anything.

Early on in this investigation, police compared how similar Lopez’s replica assault rifle looks to a real weapon.

They’ve also explained that the veteran deputy who opened fire believed Lopez was about to point the replica assault rifle at him.

But the description of events these women give is different than what investigators have described.

"Both deputies exited their vehicles, but maintained cover behind their opened doors. One of the deputies shouted at the subject to put the gun down," Santa Rosa Police Department spokesperson Paul Henry said.

These women say the deputies shouted first, then got out of their car and fired.

Another witness we talked to earlier this week describes the same.

"He pulled over to the kid walking side, and he just opened the door and shouted," Ismael Mondragon said.

The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office announced the FBI will conduct an independent investigation into the shooting death of 13-year-old Andy Lopez.

The sheriff’s office released a statement saying, “The Sheriff will cooperate fully with the FBI and welcomes their participation. The Sheriff also wants to express his thankfulness to the community for how peaceful and respectful the memorials and protests have been in the aftermath of this incident. The Sheriff continues to express his sympathy to the Lopez family and the community.”

On Friday hundreds of students marched to protest the shooting death of 13-year-old Andy Lopez.

Hundreds also attended a vigil Thursday night for the young teen for a second night in a row.

In recent memory no one can remember this much outrage in Santa Rosa. Children and teens participated in a march that ended at the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department on Friday.

A memorial service will be held for Lopez at the Resurrection Church in Windsor on Sunday.

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Rest in power. Justice for Andy & all other victims of police brutality & murder.

Fires still burn after shale gas protests in New Brunswick
October 19, 2013

A day after an anti-fracking protest here turned violent, with 40 people arrested and torched police cars sending clouds of black smoke into the air, aboriginal protesters huddled around a fire pit at the site of their anti-fracking encampment, sipping coffee and discussing their next move. A tense calm hung in the air while, down the road, local high school students gawked at the row of burnt-out vehicles towed to a vacant lot.

Canada’s national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, charged into the area early Thursday, hoping to break up a weekslong protest where demonstrators blocked the roads, denying SWN Resources Canada, a Texas-based shale gas company, the chance to retrieve its testing equipment from a storage compound.

Of the people arrested, nine are expected to spend the weekend in jail. Police used pepper-spray and rubber bullets to enforce the court-ordered injunction, according to protesters, while officers seized a number of weapons, including guns, explosive devices and knives.

The conflict, whose dramatic images spread quickly through social media, has heightened tensions between New Brunswick’s First Nations and the provincial government, and thrust the debate over the environmental impact of shale gas exploration back into the spotlight.

It has also led to protests elsewhere in Canada, with the First Nation group Idle No More saying that at least 40 events were planned throughout the country. It also prompted calls for calm from Canada’s justice minister, Peter MacKay.

On Friday, demonstrators at the encampment said the battle was far from over.

John Levi, a leading protester who is known as the war chief for the Elsipogtog First Nation, which is located a 15-minute drive from the encampment, said protesters would track down the equipment and block the company from testing for shale gas reserves elsewhere.

“If they’re in New Brunswick, we’ll find them,” said Levi, expressing concern about the environmental impact of hydraulic fracking on the water system and soil.

While Levi and many protesters are wholly opposed to shale gas development, other First Nations leaders in the province have expressed openness to the possibility if they have a greater stake in the process and more environmental precautions are taken.

Meanwhile, even though workers for SWN Resources Canada succeeded in taking out the equipment on Thursday, protesters showed no signs of clearing out of the area.

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