London’s biggest university bans student protestsDecember 9, 2013
The University of London - a body representing London universities including University College London, the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), Birkbeck and the London School of Economics - has banned protests on its campus for the next six months.
Students who hold sit-in protests in an area in Holborn, central London, including the Senate House, the student union building, and the buildings of SOAS and Birkbeck, can be imprisoned.
The president of the University of London student union, Michael Chessum, told Channel 4 News it was a “draconian” reaction and “a sign that the university had lost the argument”.
The court order obtained on the 4 December by the University of London bans “occupational protest” in the area for the next six months. Anyone breaching the order can be charged with contempt of court.
Chris Cobb, Chief Operating Officer at the University of London said: “This is a regrettable but necessary step that we have taken in order to prevent the type of violent and intimidating behaviour that we have seen by protesters at Senate House recently.”
Protest ‘ended in violence’
The University of London obtained the court order just after a sit-in protest at the student union on the 4 and 5 December. It was ended by police in violent scenes which resulted in 41 arrests. So far one protester has been charged with common assault, and the remaining 40, including three members of the union leadership, have been released on bail pending further investigations.
The protest had a series of demands calling for the university to pay sick pay to cleaners and asking the university to take a stand on the “marketisation” of higher education. It was supported but not organised by the student union.
The Metropolitan Police said that three police officers suffered minor injuries in the events that unfurled on the 4 December. The Met described what happened that evening this way: “The officers became aware of a large group, of up to 300 people, gathered and making their way along Malet Street. Some had their faces covered, others carrying home made shields. Smoke bombs and other unknown objects were thrown at police.”
Mr Chessum said that police behaviour in dispersing the protest was “at a level of violence beyond anything I’d ever seen before.”
Mr Chessum described the behaviour of some officers and security guards as “like a pub brawl”. He said: “I’ve seen people having their teeth punched out. The police were not turning up with horses and batons they were just swinging punches.”
An official statement from the student union reported violent scenes: “Initial reports indicate that protesters were assaulted by both police and security: thrown to the ground, kicked and punched, and dragged to the ground by their hair. When supporters gathered outside to show support for the occupation, they were beaten back and assaulted.”
Mr Chessum said that the union were also looking into the role that university security staff and administrators played in ending the protest. The union were compiling evidence with a view to making complaints he said.
The police said they have received no complaints regarding the behaviour of officers from anyone involved in this week’s protests and so are not investigating anything. But they have added that they will review what happened.
"As with all large public order incidents, a range of material will now be subject to review in order to establish the full facts," a statement said.
Source

London’s biggest university bans student protests
December 9, 2013

The University of London - a body representing London universities including University College London, the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), Birkbeck and the London School of Economics - has banned protests on its campus for the next six months.

Students who hold sit-in protests in an area in Holborn, central London, including the Senate House, the student union building, and the buildings of SOAS and Birkbeck, can be imprisoned.

The president of the University of London student union, Michael Chessum, told Channel 4 News it was a “draconian” reaction and “a sign that the university had lost the argument”.

The court order obtained on the 4 December by the University of London bans “occupational protest” in the area for the next six months. Anyone breaching the order can be charged with contempt of court.

Chris Cobb, Chief Operating Officer at the University of London said: “This is a regrettable but necessary step that we have taken in order to prevent the type of violent and intimidating behaviour that we have seen by protesters at Senate House recently.”

Protest ‘ended in violence’

The University of London obtained the court order just after a sit-in protest at the student union on the 4 and 5 December. It was ended by police in violent scenes which resulted in 41 arrests. So far one protester has been charged with common assault, and the remaining 40, including three members of the union leadership, have been released on bail pending further investigations.

The protest had a series of demands calling for the university to pay sick pay to cleaners and asking the university to take a stand on the “marketisation” of higher education. It was supported but not organised by the student union.

The Metropolitan Police said that three police officers suffered minor injuries in the events that unfurled on the 4 December. The Met described what happened that evening this way: “The officers became aware of a large group, of up to 300 people, gathered and making their way along Malet Street. Some had their faces covered, others carrying home made shields. Smoke bombs and other unknown objects were thrown at police.”

Mr Chessum said that police behaviour in dispersing the protest was “at a level of violence beyond anything I’d ever seen before.”

Mr Chessum described the behaviour of some officers and security guards as “like a pub brawl”. He said: “I’ve seen people having their teeth punched out. The police were not turning up with horses and batons they were just swinging punches.”

An official statement from the student union reported violent scenes: “Initial reports indicate that protesters were assaulted by both police and security: thrown to the ground, kicked and punched, and dragged to the ground by their hair. When supporters gathered outside to show support for the occupation, they were beaten back and assaulted.”

Mr Chessum said that the union were also looking into the role that university security staff and administrators played in ending the protest. The union were compiling evidence with a view to making complaints he said.

The police said they have received no complaints regarding the behaviour of officers from anyone involved in this week’s protests and so are not investigating anything. But they have added that they will review what happened.

"As with all large public order incidents, a range of material will now be subject to review in order to establish the full facts," a statement said.

Source

The People’s Record on Break Thru Radio
March 7, 2013

Hey Tumblr, we (Robert & Graciela of The People’s Record) did an interview for this really cool regular podcast on Break Thru Radio conducted by DJ Margaret. If you want to give a listen to what we had to say about the blog, or if you just want to lull yourself to sleep with our pretentious voices, go on and click here.

It’s hard not to hate yourself when you hear yourself talk, particularly about things that you care about SO much, but DJ Margaret was beyond helpful in editing out all our various clumsy ums and I’m happy with how the interview came out.

The interview starts at around 11 minutes in & continues at 22 minutes, after a song break, but the music is great so no need to skip around unless you’re in a hurry.

Alta Bates nurses go on strike!
July 03, 2012
Nurses at Alta Bates Summit Hospital on Ashby Avenue in Berkeley plan to strike today, the fifth walk-out since September 2011. The nurses are protesting concession demands they say “would undermine patient care protections as well as health and living standards for the registered nurses.”
Tuesday’s strike will affect 3,500 RNs, and also several hundred respiratory, X-ray, and other technicians at seven Alameda and San Mateo county hospitals operated by the Sutter corporation. A rally is planned at Alta Bates at 11:00 a.m.
“It has become necessary to strike again as Sutter has dug in its heels and refused to negotiate on any issue on the table,” said Alta Bates Summit RN Mike Hill in a statement published online. “They have said they want every takeaway proposed without exception despite record profits and executive salaries. This stance is unacceptable for our nurses, our communities, and our patients.”
Source

Alta Bates nurses go on strike!

July 03, 2012

Nurses at Alta Bates Summit Hospital on Ashby Avenue in Berkeley plan to strike today, the fifth walk-out since September 2011. The nurses are protesting concession demands they say “would undermine patient care protections as well as health and living standards for the registered nurses.”

Tuesday’s strike will affect 3,500 RNs, and also several hundred respiratory, X-ray, and other technicians at seven Alameda and San Mateo county hospitals operated by the Sutter corporation. A rally is planned at Alta Bates at 11:00 a.m.

“It has become necessary to strike again as Sutter has dug in its heels and refused to negotiate on any issue on the table,” said Alta Bates Summit RN Mike Hill in a statement published online. “They have said they want every takeaway proposed without exception despite record profits and executive salaries. This stance is unacceptable for our nurses, our communities, and our patients.”

Source

Arab Spring stretches to Sudan amidst new waves of protests
July 04, 2012
While the Egyptians were celebrating the declaration of the name of the first elected president in their history, the young Sudanese were launching their protest against Omar Bashir’s government because of its decision to cut fuel subsidies as part of wider economic austerity measures to rescue the country from chronic economic crisis. The protest first erupted in an impoverished eastern province before reaching some parts of the capital including Khartoum University. As all other Arab regimes have done, Omar al-Bashir’s ordered the police to crack down on the protesters using teargas and batons along with widescale arrest of the protesters as well as some opposition figures. Similarly, al-Bashir followed in the footsteps of the other Arab dictators intending to show the demonstrators partly as outlaws and spies with the official media addressing them as gays. He dismissed the suggestion that the protest was part of the Arab Spring, remarking that the demonstrators were merely a group of agitators whose aims are not shared by the majority of the Sudanese.
The Khartoum government has insisted on continuing with its austerity plans despite the public opposition. Sudan’s finance minister Ali Mahmoud said the government would stick to its decision to cut fuel subsidies regardless of the continued anti-austerity protests in Khartoum and other cities.
Source (finish the article)
The People’s Record July 4th posts!

Arab Spring stretches to Sudan amidst new waves of protests

July 04, 2012

While the Egyptians were celebrating the declaration of the name of the first elected president in their history, the young Sudanese were launching their protest against Omar Bashir’s government because of its decision to cut fuel subsidies as part of wider economic austerity measures to rescue the country from chronic economic crisis.

The protest first erupted in an impoverished eastern province before reaching some parts of the capital including Khartoum University. As all other Arab regimes have done, Omar al-Bashir’s ordered the police to crack down on the protesters using teargas and batons along with widescale arrest of the protesters as well as some opposition figures.

Similarly, al-Bashir followed in the footsteps of the other Arab dictators intending to show the demonstrators partly as outlaws and spies with the official media addressing them as gays. He dismissed the suggestion that the protest was part of the Arab Spring, remarking that the demonstrators were merely a group of agitators whose aims are not shared by the majority of the Sudanese.

The Khartoum government has insisted on continuing with its austerity plans despite the public opposition. Sudan’s finance minister Ali Mahmoud said the government would stick to its decision to cut fuel subsidies regardless of the continued anti-austerity protests in Khartoum and other cities.

Source (finish the article)

The People’s Record July 4th posts!

In case you were wondering where we went for a week, we were away at the leftist conference, Socialism2012…

July 03, 2012

Things got incredibly busy and we didn’t get to do as much live work as we will in the future, mostly because of technical issues, but we’re back now and will be launching our Kickstarter on Thursday, as well as recapping/following-up on the conference.

Overall, it was a wonderful experience. CERSC and the ISO put on a great conference and we were happy to have been a part of it.

Please follow The People’s Record, as we prepare to launch our Kickstarter, which should hopefully be a vehicle to keep us devoted to developing the blog over the next year! <3

EDIT: You can follow all the posts of things that we didn’t cover while we were gone @ thepeoplesrecord.com/whileweweregone